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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2003 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Anthropological Archaeology


This page was created at 1:19 PM on Thu, Mar 13, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)

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ANTHRARC 282(ANTHRCUL 282). Introduction to Prehistoric Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carla M Sinopoli (sinopoli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will integrate discussions of archaeological methods, with an overview of human prehistory. Our survey of method and theory will cover field and laboratory techniques for acquiring information about past cultures, methods for using that information to test ideas about past cultural organization and evolution, and current theoretical developments in anthropological archaeology. This will lay the groundwork for considering how contemporary archaeologists apply these methods to the study of the human past, including such topics as:

  • the emergence in Africa of the first proto-humans, between two and six million years ago;
  • the appearance of the first anatomically and behaviorally "modern" humans;
  • the origins of domesticated plants and animals, and the development of the first village farming communities; and
  • the rise of more complex stratified "state-level" societies.
The course will be oriented as much toward students with a general curiosity and interest in the human past as toward students who will become eventual concentrators. There will be three one-hour lectures plus one discussion section per week. Requirements: two in-class hourly exams and a final examination, plus three take-home exercises that give students firsthand experience with the analysis and interpretation of archaeological data. Required readings: Images of the Past, by G. Feinman and D. Price, and other texts to be determined.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRARC 381(ANTHRCUL 381) / ACABS 382 / HISTART 382. Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology.

Section 001 Meets with ACABS 686.001.

Instructor(s): Janet E Richards (jerichar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 382.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRARC 383(ANTHRCUL 383). Prehistory of Africa.

Section 001 Meets with CAAS 358.001.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRARC 385(ANTHRCUL 385). The Archaeology of Early Humans.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John D Speth (jdspeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the many exciting new discoveries in the archaeology of our earliest human ancestors, tracing what we know of human cultural and biological evolution from the first appearance of upright, small-brained, tool-making humans, 2.0 to 2.5 million years ago, to the appearance of fully modern humans in the last 30,000 to 40,000 years. The course is divided into two segments. The first briefly surveys the techniques and methods used by archaeologists to find ancient archaeological sites, and how they go about studying the fossil human remains, animal bones, and stone tools from these sites to learn about ancient lifeways. This section also looks at how studies of living primates in the wild, such as chimpanzees, as well as modern hunter-gatherers, such as the Bushmen and Australian Aborigines, can help us to interpret the distant past. The second segment of the course turns to the actual archaeological record, looking at some of the most important finds from Africa, Asia, and Europe. In this segment, the course follows the accelerating developmental trajectory of our ancestors from the simplest tool-makers, who lacked any sign of art or religion, to humans much like ourselves, who began to bury their dead with clear displays of ritual and who adorned the walls of their caves and their own bodies with art. The course is oriented as much toward students with a general curiosity and interest in the human past as toward students who will become eventual concentrators in anthropology. Requirements include three in-class hourly exams. Required readings: a text and course pack with articles supplementing the lectures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRARC 398(ANTHRCUL 398). Honors in Anthropological Archaeology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (ANTHRARC 399), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the first term of the Honors sequence in archaeology. We will briefly discuss the history of American archaeology and then focus on topics essential for conducting honors thesis research and writing. The course format will be discussion and presentation by students. Students will begin collecting information for their thesis by preparing an annotated bibliography of background materials and then writing a research design on their thesis topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ANTHRARC 442(ANTHRCUL 442) / ACABS 413 / HISTORY 440. Ancient Mesopotamia: History and Culture.

Section 001 Meets with ACABS 513.001.

Instructor(s): Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 413.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRARC 482(480). Topics in Anthropological Archaeology.

Section 001 Archaeology of Death.

Instructor(s): John M O'Shea (joshea@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor


Graduate Course Listings for ANTHRARC.


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