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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in English


This page was created at 12:55 PM on Thu, Mar 13, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)

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ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 001 From Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Eminem: Language's Power to Write Our Worlds.

Instructor(s): Alisse S Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL140f03/index.html

When Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a founder of the U.S. woman's rights movement, spoke to the New York State Legislature in 1854, she listed for the legislature groups of women rendered powerless by oppressive laws. "For all these," Stanton told the legislature, "we speak." In 2000, responding to extensive criticism of his music, Eminem exclaimed in one of his songs, "Damn! How much damage can you do with a pen? . . . I just said it I didn't know if you'd do it or not."

How powerful is language, really? What difference does it make? How much power does language to write or right our worlds? How does language work to persuade people or bring about change? To engage these questions, we'll read some theories about the rhetorical dimensions of language and we'll examine a range of public texts, including but not limited to speeches, essays, letters, advertisements, and songs. I anticipate that work for this course will include regular attendance and participation; weekly readings (hard copy and online written documents, photographs, audio and video clips); several brief written responses to course texts; occasional quizzes; and two exams. Check out the course website for updates.

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ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 002 Black Multiculturalism.

Instructor(s): Ifeoma C Nwankwo

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

African American, Latino, and West Indian do the distinctions we make between them really make sense? How do the groups clash and connect? Are Latinos like Sammy Sosa Black? Where do mixtures between hip hop, salsa, and dancehall reggae fit? How are the histories of these groups similar and different? What are Colin Powell and Busta Rhymes African American or Caribbean? By examining contemporary and historical African American, West Indian, and Latino/Latin American literature, music, and film we will gain insight into the persistence of cross-group stereotypes, instances of intermixture between the groups, and tensions between individual figures.

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ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 003 Native American Fiction.

Instructor(s): Lincoln B Faller (faller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All Americans know something about Native Americans at least they think they do. Stereotypes abound and, for most of our history, most of them have been vicious. But all stereotypes are damaging to the people they include, even the most benign and supposedly positive. Where vicious stereotypes would silence and discredit those they target, stereotypes of the supposedly benign kind are all too ready to speak for them, preempting their own efforts to speak the truth as they see it.

The course will involve a close study of some five works of fiction by Native American writers, all of which powerfully contradict the usual ways of imagining and thinking about "Indians." It will begin with an extended look at a work which is neither fictive nor entirely Native-authored, John Neidhardt's Black Elk Speaks; this will help us to identify certain crucial problems in the reading and interpretation of texts infused with Native American cultural values and emerging from Native American experience, from a perspective outside those values and that experience. Subsequent readings will include D'Arcy McNickle's The Surrounded, James Welch's The Death of Jim Loney, Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony, Louise Erdrich's Tracks, and Sherman Alexie's Smoke Signals.

Students will be required to make several class presentations, to write weekly response papers as well as two short essays, and to participate in a group research project culminating in an end-of-term presentation and a collaboratively written paper.

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ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 004 Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Midwest is home to more Nobel Prize Winners in Literature than any other comparable region of the world. What is it about this area that has captured the imagination of the nation? What is it about this literature that resonates so widely with people from other countries that they award it so many prestigious honors? Join us as we explore the writings of Sinclair Lewis, Ernest Hemingway, Saul Bellow and Toni Morrison who, though they may not all write about the Midwest all of the time, write with a "midwestern sensibility." What is "midwestern literature"? How have these writers helped to shape and define it? What have other midwestern writers contributed to this tradition? Assignments include weekly Reading Responses, a final project (a term paper or a Web-page), and a final exam.

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ENGLISH 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 002 Fantasies of Childhood in British Literature.

Instructor(s): Lisa Makman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This sophomore seminar focuses on the ways children are represented in 19th and 20th century British literature. We will read from a broad selection of works written for children and for adults. Our writers will include William Wordsworth, WIlliam Blake, Charles Dickens, Christina Rossetti, Lewis Carroll, J.M. Barrie, Roald Dahl, and J.K. Rowling. Exploring themes such as innocnce versus experience, the child's imagination, and development through play, we will trace the emergence of modern childhood. Requirements: midterm, final, response papers, term paper.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 003.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 004.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 005.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 006.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 007.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 008.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 009.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 010.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 011.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Ian Stuart Twiss

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 013.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 014.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 015.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 016.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 017.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 018.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 019.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 020.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 021.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 022.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 030, 031, 032 SECTIONS 030-032 ARE RESTRICTED TO CSP STUDENTS.

Instructor(s): Charles Lavelle Taylor III

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, SECTIONS 030-032 ARE RESTRICTED TO CSP STUDENTS.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 031.

Instructor(s): Charles Lavelle Taylor III

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 032.

Instructor(s): Ralph D Story

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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ENGLISH 227 / THTREMUS 227. Introductory Playwriting.

Instructor(s): OyamO (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 227.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 003.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 004.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 005.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 006.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 007.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 008.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 009.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 010.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 001 Literature of the Americas.

Instructor(s): Susan Y Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 002 Topic?

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 003 Global Literature.

Instructor(s): Simon E Gikandi (gikandi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 004 Living With Nature.

Instructor(s): John R Knott Jr (jknott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will approach the question, "What is Literature?," by reading texts that deal in some way with the changing relationships of humans to the natural world. We will look at a variety of cultural perspectives within the literature of the United States and explore questions about how Americans have conceptualized and lived with nature. Readings will include fiction, "creative nonfiction," and some poetry. We will begin withshort stories and essays (from a coursepack), then take up texts including Mary Austin, Land of Little Rain; Willa Cather, My Antonia; Norman Maclean, A River Runs Through It; Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony; Mary Oliver, House of Light; Terry Tempest Williams, Refuge; and T.C. Boyle, A Friend of the Earth. Three short papers, a final examination, and occasional in-class writing.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 005 The Family.

Instructor(s): Brenda K Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Our method throughout the semester will be to approach the question "What is literature?" by asking, "What is [it we talk about when we talk about] literature?" 'Family' (and how that concept may vary) is the thematic lens through which we will study several contemporary novels. We will interrogate as well the notion of "home." We will begin by practicing our interpretive skills through "close readings" of Toni Morrison's Sula. This will be followed by an investigation of how earlier "literary" texts-e.g., Joseph Conrad's The Secret Sharer and Tennessee Williams' The Night of the Iguana -affect our reading of a novel, in this case Ron Hansen's Atticus. With Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones we will turn our attention to the relationship between representations of history and subjectivity in historical fiction. We will enhance our reading of Marilynn Robinson's Housekeeping through a study of selected critical essays, and in the process practice identifying what is at stake in the arguments presented. Finally, we will put it all together in our discussion of Michael Cunningham's Flesh and Blood.

There will be three one-page position papers, and two 4-page papers due. Class attendance and participation are essential.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 006 Telling Stories: A Need to Narrate.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will want, in this course, to think about the power and the connectedness that the act of telling stories might provide. For example a character in Ursula Hegi's STONES FROM THE RIVER, thinks: "Every time I take a story and let it stream through my mind from beginning to end, it grows fuller, richer, feeding on my visions of those people the story belongedto until it leaves its bed like the river I love. And then I have to tell the story to someone."

Our readings will often focus on the dynamics of the imaginative process - our own as well as the authors. We will want to begin by trying to uncover the strong need of each individual to tell his or her story. Moreover, as the semester continues and we discuss various 20th-century literature (mostly), we will find ourselves grappling with issues as basic as what defines the dimensions of a character and the place that character makes in his or her world. We want to pay particular attention to the narrators of each story we read. Ultimately, I hope we can understand how an author has prepared these amazing creations to "speak" to us. Although the final syllabus decision has not been made, I am sure we will want to listen to one of John Irving's narrators as well as Gloria Naylor's variety of narrators telling us the story of Mama Day. There will be two essays, a midterm and final exam required.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack (epollack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 009 Inventing Reality.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will focus on the novel to explore some of the factors prompting the question "what is literature." From their inception, as John Fowles contends, fiction writers shared the "wish to create worlds as real as, but other than the world that is." Imitating life was the novelist's goal, in as diverse renderings of so-called "reality" as George Eliot's depiction of "ordinary life," or R.L. Stevenson's fantasy-like version of the odd couple of Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde; or Virginia Woolf's impressionistic interior monologues. Even post-modern writers, cynical about any professed connection between literature and reality presented their own versions of "what's real" by foregrounding their inability to be certain about the conclusions to their texts (John Fowles) or denying having any privileged information about their characters (both Fowles and Tim O'Brien). Shifting literary styles, and the changing philosophical definitions of social and psychological reality that shaped them, will be our subject. Texts will include, John Fowles, The French Lieutenant's Woman, Toni Morrison's, Sula, short stories by Hemingway and Kundera, Tim O'Brien's, In the Lake of the Woods, Art Spiegelman's Maus I and II, Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse. Any additional texts will be listed on my web site (http:/www-personal.umich.edu/~merla/.) Requirements: a reading journal, a 6-8 pg essay and a 10 (typed) pp. take-home exam; class participation, and regular attendance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1In this course, we will focus on the novel to explore some of the factors prompting the question "what is literature." From their inception, as John Fowles contends, fiction writers shared the "wish to create worlds as real as, but other than the world that is." Imitating life was the novelist's goal, in as diverse renderings of so-called "reality" as George Eliot's depiction of "ordinary life,"

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meirejzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Looking specifically at works by writers who represent and/or discuss multiple racial backgrounds and identifications, this course asks such questions as: How do race, class, and gender shape our ideas about literature? How is "race" and specifically, African American identity constructed in these works? Who is this literature for? How do legal definitions of "color" shape a specific writer1s presentation of race? What does this literature tell us about power? How might each of us read a literary work differently, and why? Using several poems as our starting point, we will read and discuss works from a list that may include (but is not limited to) Harriet Jacob's account of her days as an enslaved person, James Weldon Johnson's The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, Nella Larsen's Quicksand and Passing, Lillian Smith's Strange Fruit, William Faulkner's Go Down Moses, James MacBride's The Color of Water, and Gus Lee's China Boy.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 011 Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 003 [Honors].

Instructor(s): Linda K Gregerson (gregerso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Richard L Hilles (rhilles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

My aim for this course is to enrich your understanding and love of poetry by introducing you to - and asking you to meaningfully engage with - a range of influential poems written in English. Toward this end, we will focus on major poems written from the Renaissance to the present time. Through close readings - class discussions and written explorations of these texts - we will examine how poems achieve their power. Because seriously engaged classroom discussion is vital to this class, regular attendance and active participation are required. The Norton Anthology of Poetry will be our primary text, in addition to handouts.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 007.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson (johnaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Too often poetry is seen as a literary form that only dedicated writers, academics, and their victims (students) read. I hope that the experience of reading and discussing poems in this course will encourage you to read poetry outside the classroom. The course will provide you with extensive practice in close reading that should challenge and develop your interpretive abilities. We will focus throughout the term on the designs of poetry - its formal aspects and its purpose: the means by which each poem makes its claims on a reader's attention. Discussions will repeatedly raise questions about the act of reading, of interpretation itself. How does a community of readers arrive at a consensus on the meaning of a poem? We will be working from The Norton Anthology of Poetry and a course pack. Assignments will include frequent oral reports and numerous short papers (2-3 pp.), and a final essay (10 pp.) on a poet of your choice. Participation in discussions is required; attendance is mandatory.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 009 Petals on a Wet Black Bough.

Instructor(s): Lyall H Powers

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 245 / RCHUMS 280 / THTREMUS 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bert Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

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ENGLISH 267. Introduction to Shakespeare.

Section 001 SHAKESPEARE'S MANY FACES.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of Introductory Composition. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will, in this course, take a contemporary perspective on a varied selection of Shakespeare's plays. We will begin with a close reading of the plays themselves, as Shakespeare wrote them, and then we will begin watching videos of the plays as they are presented with diverse interpretations. We want to compare the way in which directors, producers, and actors revisit the great drama of the High Renaissance in England. For example, when we watch HAMLET as performed by Kenneth Branagh or Ethan Hawkes or Mel Gibson how do our individual perceptions of the play become enhanced? Or, as we watch Ian McKellen's production of RICHARD III in light of what we have learned about a contemporary society's view of this king illuminated by Al Pacino's SEARCHING FOR RICHARD, we want to explore the range of possibilities that Shakespeare's drama allows. We will continue our work by examining the following plays in addition to HAMLET AND RICHARD III: MERCHANT OF VENICE; TWELTH NIGHT; MEASURE FOR MEASURE; THE WINTER'S TALE; AND MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING.

The course will be all about discussion and more discussion. We will spend 3 hours a week discussing the plays; in addition, you will need to watch the videos of all the plays outside of class I will schedule the same showing 2 nights/wk, so you will have a choice of the night that is convenient for you.

There will be short essays throughout the academic term and a comprehensive final exam.

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ENGLISH 270. Introduction to American Literature.

Section 001 American Voices.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

One of the major themes in American literature is the "Americanization" of ENGLISH 270 will follow the theme of Americanization beginning with Nathaniel Hawthorne, one of the writers in the traditional American canon, and continuing with novels and short stories from other American voices and talents including women, Chicano, Asian-, African-, Native- and European-American writers, selections which more fully represent "American" or United States literature. The course will be a mix of lecture and discussion, and all students are expected to read and be prepared to discuss the works in class. Requirements also include weekly reading responses, final and two short 4-5 page papers.

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ENGLISH 274 / CAAS 274. Introduction to Afro-American Literature.

Section 001 African American Literature in the U.S., from 1773 to 1912.

Instructor(s): Xiomara A Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 285. Introduction to Twentieth-Century Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will consider how a variety of writers reflect and respond to the major historical, social, political, philosophical, and moral issues and preoccupations of the 20th century. The works we will study are eclectic and arbitrarily chosen; there is no attempt to be all-inclusive, nor will we limit ourselves to English and American authors. Our subject will be some representative works of modern thought and literature. We will place equal emphasis on what these works say and how they say it. Our purpose is to sharpen the insight and intelligence with which we read and analyze some of the probing "documents" of our time. Candidates for the reading list [availability of texts and reasonableness of prices will be factors] include works by Albert Camus, D.M. Thomas, E.L. Doctorow, Philip Roth, Saul Bellow, Friedrich Duerrenmatt, Jerzy Kosinski, Margaret Atwood or several others. Informal lecture and discussion, the amount of which will be influenced by the size of the class. Thoughtful, active participation "counts." Two papers [ca. 5-7 pp. each] and a final exam.

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ENGLISH 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 305. Introduction to Modern English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard W Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Recommended for students preparing to teach English. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Though a requirement for students seeking certification as secondary school English teachers, ENGLISH 305 appeals to a broader audience interested in the structure of English and its varieties. Topics to be discussed include: gender-based differences in American English and regional and social dialects in the United States, including African-American English, Appalachian English, Hispanic English, and Native American English; and English as a rule-governed language, shaped by its history, and the history of ideas about good (and "bad" English). ENGLISH 305 is designed for native-speakers of English (with no prior study of the language or of linguistics) who are curious about the language community of which they are a part. A midterm and final examination allow students to demonstrate the ability to make well-founded generalizations based on the material studied. Short papers invite explorations of domains of language.

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ENGLISH 308. History of the English Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anne Leslie Curzan (acurzan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers the opportunity to explore the dramatic ways in which the English language has changed over the past 1200 years dramatic enough that we as Modern English speakers can barely understand those who first began to call their language "English" (and wrote texts such as Beowulf). In the broadest terms, this course will explore how English developed from a little-known west Germanic dialect spoken on an island off the coast of western Europe into a distinct, international language spoken as a native tongue by almost 400 million people. To this end, we will also consider a variety of more specific questions such as: Where did the pronoun she come from? (And why is it the Word of the Millennium?) When was double negation considered standard? How did English spelling become, according to Mario Pei, the "world's most awesome mess"? Why and how do "living" languages change? This course will examine the traditional stages in the "life" of English: Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English, and Modern English. We will focus on the general sound, word, and grammar changes within the language, as well as related literary, cultural, and historical events. In the process, as we learn more about the language's past, we will think about the meaning and implications of the language's present and future. Course work will consist of frequent short assignments, two short papers, a midterm, and a final. The critical prerequisite for the course is genuine curiosity about the details of language and how language changes.

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ENGLISH 310. Discourse and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 124 or 125. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

ENGLISH 310 teaches students to use their creative skills and social commitments to facilitate the powerful expressiveness of high school youth. It is rooted in respect for the youths' abilities and voices, in excitement about an educational process that promotes creativity, and in imaginative collaboration with the school faculty and administration. Working two to three hours a week at Henry Ford, and Cooley, High Schools in Detroit, and at the Adrian and Maxey Training Schools, Boysville, and Vista Maria, students assist youth in creating their own video tapes, plays, photographs, music, writings, art, etc. In two hour class meetings we discuss background reading, analyze and develop our work with the youth, and teach each other hands-on methods. A further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. No exams. Admission to the class is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 Angell Hall for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

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ENGLISH 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 001 Fantasy.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the nature and uses of fantastic narratives from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present, drawing texts from such widely different fields as fairy tales, science fiction, and the so-called New Novel. No special background in literature is required. The course requires attendance at two lectures and one discussion section per week. The written work for the course will revolve around a series of short papers and two medium-length papers. There will be no exams. Texts include: Household Stories of The Brothers Grimm; Tales of E. T. A. Hoffmann; The Portable Poe; The Alice books, Lewis Carroll; The Island of Dr. Moreau and Best Science Fiction Stories, H. G. Wells; The Complete Stories, Franz Kafka; Orlando, Virginia Woolf; The Erasers, Alain Robbe-Grillet; The Tolkien Reader; The Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster; Cosmicomics, Italo Calvino; Like Water for Chocolate; Laura Esquivel, and Woman on The Edge of Time, Marge Piercy.

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ENGLISH 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 010 Topic?

Instructor(s): Vivasvan Soni (vivasvan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 315 / WOMENSTD 315. Women and Literature.

Section 001 Women Poets & Feminist Critics.

Instructor(s): Johanna H Prins

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Over the past three decades, feminist critics have turned to women poets to explore questions about female subjectivity, to construct alternative literary traditions, and to imagine the possibilities for a feminist poetics.

In this course, we will read women's poetry from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries alongside recent critical essays, in order to analyze and historicize different ideas about "the woman poet." We will consider how and why particular women poets (such as Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Emily Dickinson, H.D., Sylvia Plath, Adrienne Rich, Eavan Boland, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Rita Dove) have become significant figures within feminist literary criticism.

Our goal throughout the academic term will be to develop critical skills and appreciation for the complexity of writing in (and on) poetry by women. Course requirements will include two 7-8 page papers, several informal writing assignments, participation in a student panel, and regular attendance. No final exam.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 001 Constructing Ireland: Nationalism and Society in Modern Irish.

Instructor(s): George J Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class will study the twentieth-century Irish Literary Renaissance within the twin contexts of Irish literature and Irish history rather than the more usual contexts of British literature and international Modernism. Reading will include poetry by W. B. Yeats, fiction by James Joyce and Elizabeth Bowen, and plays by Lady Gregory, John Synge, and Sean O'Casey, as well as less well- known materials by writers like Douglas Hyde, Patrick Pearse, and Katharine Tynan. We will also read a small amount of history and historical documents, of popular culture (cartoons and songs), and of theoretical material. Bearing in mind that Ireland was England's oldest and longest-held colony, we will study particularly the relations between literature and nationalism, between Irish and English contexts for Irish literature, and between nationality and cosmopolitanism in Irish works of this period. Along the way, we will explore hybridity as a model for thinking about culture, using especially Irish, Black, and Jewish examples. Written work will depend on class size, but will include at least a paper and a final examination, and probably either an hour exam or a second paper.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 002 How to be Gay: Male Homosexuality and Initiation.

Instructor(s): David M Halperin (halperin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Just because you happen to be a gay man doesn't mean that you don't have to learn how to become one. Gay men do some of that learning on their own, but often we learn how to be gay from others, either because we look to them for instruction or because they simply tell us what they think we need to know, whether we ask for their advice or not.

This course will examine the general topic of the role that initiation plays in the formation of gay male identity. We will approach it from three angles: (1) as a sub-cultural practice subtle, complex, and difficult to theorize which a small but significant body of work in queer studies has begun to explore; (2) as a theme in gay male writing; and (3) as a class project, since the course itself will constitute an experiment in the very process of initiation that it hopes to understand.

In particular, we will examine a number of cultural artifacts and activities that seem to play a prominent role in learning how to be gay: Hollywood movies, grand opera, Broadway musicals, and other works of classical and popular music, as well as camp, diva-worship, drag, muscle culture, taste, style, and political activism. Are there a number of classically "gay" works such that, despite changing tastes and generations, all gay men, of whatever class, race, or ethnicity, need to know them, in order to be gay? What is there about gay identity that explains the gay appropriation of these works? What do we learn about gay male identity by asking not who gay men are but what it is that gay men do or like? One aim of exploring these questions is to approach gay identity from the perspective of social practices and cultural identifications rather than from the perspective of gay sexuality itself. What can such an approach tell us about the sentimental, affective, or subjective dimensions of gay identity, including gay sexuality, that an exclusive focus on gay sexuality cannot?

At the core of gay experience there is not only identification but disidentification. Almost as soon as I learn how to be gay, or perhaps even before, I also learn how not to be gay. I say to myself, "Well, I may be gay, but at least I'm not like that!" Rather than attempting to promote one version of gay identity at the expense of others, this course will investigate the stakes in gay identifications and disidentifications, seeking ultimately to create the basis for a wider acceptance of the plurality of ways in which people determine how to be gay.

Additional note. This course is not a basic introduction to gay male culture, but an exploration of certain issues arising from it. It assumes some background knowledge. Students wishing to inform themselves about gay men and gay culture in a preliminary way should enroll in an introductory course in lesbian/gay studies.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 003 Literature of the American Wilderness. Satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators. Meets with ENVIRON 377.001.

Instructor(s): John R Knott Jr (jknott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is wilderness, and how have American attitudes toward wilderness evolved? The course will explore these questions and others about how Americans (including Native Americans) have perceived the natural world and their relationship to it, as these arise from texts ranging from the earliest writing about America to late twentieth-century responses to Alaska. Readings will include texts illustrating the place of wilderness in the American imagination, such as Thoreau's The Maine Woods (selections), Muir's My First Summer in the Sierra, Cather's O Pioneers!, Leopold's Sand County Almanac, Faulkner's The Bear, and Momaday's House Made of Dawn. We will also read poetry (Snyder, Berry, Ammons, Oliver) and selections from twentieth-century nature writers (including Abbey, Dillard, Lopez). Students will be expected to keep a weekly journal, to write a paper of about ten pages, and to take a final examination. Anyone with an interest in the literature and the issues it raises is welcome.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 004 Anarchy in the U.S.A.: Exploring Radical Thirties Narrative.

Instructor(s): John H McGuigan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An attempt to "think historically" motivates this course, an attempt we'll engage both in theoretical terms (What can it mean to think historically?) and in practical terms (How can one do it?). In some ways, we can change the past, and do so every day not in terms of what happened but in our understanding of it. Using the University's Labadie Collection, we'll confront these issues by exploring the complex relationship between art and politics, discovering the concrete artifacts that surround and inform politically-minded U.S. literature written in the 1930s. Each looks back over the first forty years of the century, a particularly rich period that saw an explosion of oppositional European art movements (Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, etc.) and political movements (socialism, anarchism, fascism, etc.) find fertile ground in this country. Studying novels alongside art works of various media, contemporaneous reactions, and primary documents from radical political movements lets us examine not only relationships between specific art trends and specific political positions of the past, but also the politics of identifying and analyzing such relationships in effect, the making of history. By adding a political dimension, our searches may lead us to consider the extent to which a given historical economic situation promotes a specific range of political and artistic expression. How do these modes of expression speak to each other or to the historical moment?

Assignments for this class include three short papers and a reading journal. Some of this class' workload comes from treasure-hunting in the University's library and museum holdings. Course readings will include novels such as For Whom the Bell Tolls (Hemingway), Pity Is Not Enough (Herbst), Blood on the Forge (Attaway), Jews Without Money (Gold), and The Big Money (Dos Passos); news clippings, pamphlets, and other archival materials; and short theoretical pieces.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 005 Globalization and Literature.

Instructor(s): Richard W Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Healthy languages are always borrowing from each other," writes a prominent scholar, and, just as biodiversity sustains healthy ecosystems, so linguistic diversity nourishes civilization. Over the next century, about two languages will die every month, and a century from now the linguistic landscape will be very different from what it now is. English plays a role, and the use of English is increasing all over the world. Yet it is multilingualism that is growing even more rapidly, and many nations, large and small, are recognizing and responding to this trend. What transformations are involved in this massive change? What is the role of English in it? How have policy makers and poets responded? We will begin by reading: Vanishing Voices: The Extinction of the World's Languages (Oxford University Press). Then we will turn to a course pack and case studies. This small class is offered as part of the "globalization" curriculum and participants are expected to participate in the major events offered through it. There will be a mid-term, a final, and a major paper.

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ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 001 Rhetorical Activism & US Civil Rigts Movements.

Instructor(s): Alisse S Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

R&E

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The signers of the United States Constitution recognized the power of rhetorical activism when they declared freedom of expression the most important right of United States citizens. Susan B. Anthony and dozens of other women spent eight decades using the only power they had, the power of language, to ensure women their right to vote in this country. The persuasive eloquence of Martin Luther King, Jr. changed this nation's consciousness as well as the experience of civil rights for all of its citizens. And although the United States did not ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, people like Shirley Chisholm and Betty Friedan forever altered the expectations and opportunities for women and men. How did these ordinary people accomplish extraordinary things by speaking up and speaking out? More broadly, how do people use language to define, reform, and even revolutionize politics and society? That will be our central question as we study texts representing a range of positions from several U.S. civil rights movements: the early woman's rights, antislavery, women's liberation, 1960s civil rights, and gay rights movements. Work for this course includes weekly readings (hard copy and online), exams, and quizzes.

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ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 002 Literature and Revolution, 1640-1800. Satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Vivasvan Soni (vivasvan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 001 Poetry.

Instructor(s): G Keith Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a poetry writing workshop intended for student writers with some experience in the art. The hope is that these writers will produce new work and participate in the critical discussion of their own work and that of their colleagues. Members of the class will submit new poems every week for evaluation. A few formal and thematic assignments will be given as needed to help focus some of the writing.

Although the on-going process of writing poems is the central focus of the course, a fair amount of reading and some critical writing will also be required. Final evaluations will be based on 25-30 pages of poetry that has gone through some level of revision, 3 short papers about poetry readings, one classroom presentation on a living poet, and two short classroom presentations on different poetic forms or devices.

In order to enroll in this course, students need 1) Get on the Waitlist. 2) Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Tuesday, September 2nd. 3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 002 Fiction.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

In order to enroll in this course, students need to:

  • Get on the Waitlist.
  • Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on September 2nd.
  • When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 003 Fiction.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

In order to enroll in this course, students need to:

  • Get on the Waitlist.
  • Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on September 2nd.
  • When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 004 Poetry.

Instructor(s): Richard L Hilles (rhilles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an intermediate-level workshop in poetry writing. The focus of this class will be on writing and discussing your original work, and we will also read and discuss a variety of other poems from other sources, time periods, and traditions. Your final grade will be based on workshop participation, written critiques, and a final poetry portfolio of fifteen to twenty pages.

To enroll in this course, students will need to waitlist on Wolverine Access and submit 10-15 pages of poetry to the Main Office, room 3187 AH by Sept. 5th at noon.

All applicants will be notified of admittance or non-admittance by email soon thereafter.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 005 Fiction.

Instructor(s): Brenda K Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this writing seminar we will read and discuss selected short stories, write several pieces of fiction, and critique each other's work. We will begin the semester by reading and writing mini-narratives (or short short stories). In the process we will focus on understanding and using a vocabulary through which to discuss the craft of fiction. As the semester progresses we will move on to longer stories. Evaluation will be based on attendence and participation, written critiques, and a final fiction portfolio of approximately 30 pages. The text we will use is The Best American Short Stories 2002, ed. Sue Miller.

In order to enroll in this course, students need to:

* Get on the Waitlist.

* Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on Tuesday, September 2.

* When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 001 The Mask.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil," a parable in which a good parson comes out of his house one morning wearing a veil over his face, the Townspeople respond by whispering to each other: "He has changed himself into something awful, only by hiding his face." The center of our discussions in this writing class will be to address the questions of created personas, of inspired identities. The characters we read about will help us understand lives we haven't lived, whereas our own writing, perhaps, will be inspired by the lives we have lived or want to live, by the "stories" we want to tell. Each individual community we belong to (for example: friend, student, child, sibling, religious preference [or non-preference], sexual partner) encourages us to play a different role. So many communities. So many roles. Our readings will have us, in small ways, experience the lives of different ethnic groups, genders, and sexual orientations. Our writing will need to use this experience of the other as we attempt to create a rhetorical "I" to narrate our own essays. Reading contemporary literature, discussion, writing, and more writing will be the mainstay of the class. Assignments include: approximately three 7-8 page drafts of essays and a weekly peer response from each student. The readings will be selected from a diverse group of authors of different genders, ethnic backgrounds, socio-economic classes, sexualities, and religions.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline Ellen Livesay

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 003 Finding Your Voice.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Much like the ENGLISH 225 courses I have taught over the last dozen years, this course will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy majoring reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage Dictionary, Fourth Edition

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 005 Life-Stories (The Personal Essay).

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course engages students in the process of collecting and writing life-stories, including their own. After two weeks of reading, reflection, and training, students will begin weekly visits to two Detroit sites, to mentor and facilitate life-writing activities with schoolchildren and elderly there. In class, students will reflect deeply in discussion and in writing on their community work, as well as read and comment on personal essays by others (i.e., Maya Angelou, Nancy Mairs, Richard Rodriguez, Annie Dillard, among others). We will focus on how differences in race, ethnicity, gender, and physical ability inform these essays; we will address such questions as: how is life-story linked to body, place, and tradition? How do people sort and make sense of their lives? What do they choose to remember, or to forget? Why and how is the making of life-stories so important to us? In addition to weekly journal entries on the intersection between our community-based life-work and our own lives, students will pre-write, peer-review, and complete their own 10-page personal essay by the course end.

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ENGLISH 326. Community Writing and Public Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 124 or 125. (3). (CE). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 327 / THTREMUS 327. Intermediate Playwriting.

Instructor(s): OyamO (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 227. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 327.

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ENGLISH 331(413) / FILMVID 331. Film Genres and Types.

Section 001 Horror Films.

Instructor(s): Ira Konigsberg (ikonigsb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 331.001.

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ENGLISH 350 / MEMS 350. Literature in English to 1660.

Section 001 ENGLISH MASTERWORKS OF THE MIDDLE AGES AND RENAISSANCE. satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be an intensive study of some representative masterworks of the Middle Ages and Renaissance in England. While dealing with these texts analytically, we will also explore them in their historical, social, political and cultural contexts. Readings will include a substantial selection from Chaucer's CANTERBURY TALES [in Middle English; learn to read it and dazzle your friends], SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT, some medieval plays, Marlowe's DOCTOR FAUSTUS, a selection of Renaissance lyric poetry [e.g., Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, Marvell], and a Jacobean play by Jonson or Webster, one by each if time allows. English 350 devotes three hours a week to lecture, accompanied by as much interaction as the size of the class allows and the vitality of the bodies in it generates. Groups of twenty-five students will meet a fourth hour under the leadership of seasoned doctoral student GSIs to discuss the material further and to work on the writing assignments for the course. Each student will write two essays of approximately five pages each, a one-hour in-class essay at mid-term and a final examination. Students who have taken ENGLISH 370 with Prof. Bauland in Winter Term of '02 or '03 should NOT enroll for this section of ENGLISH 350.

Approximate book cost: $50 - $60.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 367 / MEMS 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 001 History of Early English Poetry. [Honors].

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

After a brief survey of English prose from the 14th to the 18th Century, we shall study the following forms from the same period: alliterative verse, rhymed couplets, various stanza forms, sonnets, and blank verse (narratives and plays). The emphasis will be on shifts of style through time, on trying to define and explain these shifts in terms of cultural forces and authorial talents. Poets will include Langland, Chaucer, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, and Pope. Everyone will need to learn to read Middle English, to scan verse, and to gain familiarity with various terms for characterizing poetic style. Everyone will be asked to engage in detailed textual analysis as well as to write on broader issues. A substantial essay reporting original research will be required. Required texts: The Norton Anthology of Literature, Vol. I, and a course pack.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 002 Things Unattempted Yet in Prose or Rhyme.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 002 Banned Books. Satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): David L Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For as long as free-thinking authors have been moved to write, censors have attempted to stem the tide of dangerous ideas flowing from their pens. In this course, we will read a broad selection of important, well-known books from the period 1600-1830 that have, at some point, been banned, burned, or censored by political or religious authorities. We will explore the history, causes, effects, and cultural implications of various kinds of censorship, and we'll examine each of our readings from the perspective both of its intended audience and of those who have felt threatened or disturbed by the ideas it expressed. The reading list will include selections from the works of some of the following authors: Shakespeare, Milton, Behn, Locke, Defoe, Swift, Richardson, Voltaire, Cleland, Sterne, Rousseau, Paine, Goethe, and Sade. The class will be conducted as a seminar with an emphasis on detailed discussion of the readings. Students will have the option of submitting a collaborative web-based research project for inclusion on the Eighteenth-Century England website (http://www.umich.edu/~ece) in place of a traditional research paper and/or final exam.

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ENGLISH 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 001 What Was Modernism?

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 002 Reforming Literature: From the Industrial Novel to the Make-it-New Aesthetic.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Here we look to the term reform in two sense the political and the aesthetic to explore how politics and aesthetics interrelate in a British literary tradition. We begin with a literature that seeks political reform early Victorian "social problem" writings with their portraits of societal injustices and we conclude by examining a literature that is itself being aesthetically reformed modernist works determined to reenvision the very nineteenth-century styles of literary representation with which our course begins. On the way, we see various means through which literary works engage social and legislative concerns, such as justice and fairness. Likely authors include Gaskell, Dickens, Trollope, George Eliot, J.S. Mill, Pater, Shaw and Woolf.

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ENGLISH 381 / AMCULT 324. Asian American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria S See (ssee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 382 / AMCULT 328. Native American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Betty L Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will read the Native American novels, non-fiction works, and films most commonly associated with the Native American literary renaissance and the popularization of contemporary pan-tribal culture. Produced over a thirty year period, 1968-98, these texts profoundly affected the ways in which Americans and Native Americans view indigenous cultures and peoples. The works of Vine Deloria, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Silk, and others will guide our explorations into tribal sovereignty, spirituality, gender, and the creation of a popular pan-tribal literature. We will view films, such as Smoke Signals and Dance Me Outside, to assist our discussions on native self-representation in popular culture. Major course assignments will include in-class midterm and take home final.

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ENGLISH 383. Topics in Jewish Literature.

Section 001 Jewish Culture in America: 1945 to the Present.

Instructor(s): Julian Arnold Levinson (jlevinso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 384 / CAAS 384 / AMCULT 406. Topics in Caribbean Literature.

Section 001 Life and Literature in the Contemporary Caribbean Diaspora.

Instructor(s): Ifeoma C Nwankwo

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 406 / LING 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an advanced survey of descriptive English grammar. We will look closely at the formal and semantic motivations for basic grammatical categories and processes in English (words, phrases, clauses, and sentences) and we will discuss how these structures contribute to the expressive potential of the system. There will be daily practice in grammatical parsing, weekly quizzes, and a final exam. The course should be attractive to those professionally interested in English education, practical criticism, or further work in linguistic theory as well as those generally interested in becoming more articulate about the structure of our language. Texts: Randolph Quirk and Sidney Greenbaum, A Student's Grammar of the English Language and John Algeo, Exercises in Contemporary English.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 Old English.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the earliest texts written in English over a thousand years ago. We will begin with Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the first objective of this course will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. We will conclude with the study of the later texts which continue the Anglo-Saxon tradition alliterative tradition. My chief aim is to help you develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Lisa Makman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class provides an introduction to the major genres of children's literature. Students will read from a wide variety of classical and contemporary works, from The Tale of Peter Rabbit to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone . The genres we will study include fairytales, historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction. The class will cultivate an awareness of story patterns, generic conventions and innovations. Among the topics to be considered are conceptions of child's play, gender and the child's development, imagining the child's imagination, sense and nonsense, and coming of age. The class will also examine broader questions such as the following. What are possible pedagogical functions of literature for children? What meanings are given to childhood in our culture and what is the role played by children's literauture in producing these meanings? How have the meanings given to childhood changed historically? Requirements: response papers, final exam and research paper.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 003 War and 20th Century US Art.

Instructor(s): John H McGuigan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

American culture was profoundly shaped during the 1900s by a series of new wars creating new conditions both for soldiers on the fronts and civilians at home. Starting from that rather obvious premise, this course explores the "how" and "why." The shocking scale and mechanization of World War I, costly non-intervention in the Spanish Civil War and the resulting necessity of World War II, the forgotten Korean War, the domestically divisive Vietnam conflict, the restorative Desert Storm each conflict abroad necessitated a renegotiated sense of self at home. Many of the art works we will study define themselves in opposition to the respective official government line, but through the use of primary sources we will examine both sides of the domestic battle for the cultural and rhetorical upper-hand, as people fight to determine how a conflict will be understood and how it will be remembered. Soldiers' letters, for example, can illuminate the role art played in the lives of soldiers, helping them negotiate the danger of their immediate environment and inform their sense of the larger historical and political forces at work.

This course requires two shorter papers and a 10pp research project using University research collections. Readings could include works by Faulkner, Hemingway, H.D., Dos Passos, Heller, Vonnegut, O'Brien, Komunyakaa, and Bowden, in addition to films and journalism.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 004 Topic?

Instructor(s): Susan Y Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 005 Topic?

Instructor(s): Xiomara A Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 411. Art of the Film.

Section 001 Prison Reality.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

With 25 percent of the world's prisoners, the United States is the most incarcerating nation in the world. Thirteen percent of the U.S. population, African Americans are 50.8 percent of our prison population. In 1979, 1 in 14 Michigan state workers were employed in the state prison system; it is now close to 1 in 3. Michigan has built over 30 prisons in the past 17 years. We have eliminated higher education, instituted longer sentences, and handed down harsher punishments. Yet to most of us, prisons remain invisible places we ignore or know only through rumors, myths, and the speeches of politicians. This course will address prison reality and culture and the ways in which prisons are represented to us and to others. Discussions will focus on the works and their implications about personal attitudes and behavior and about social institutions. Expect journals and final projects. There will be no exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 Technology & the Humanities.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu), Victor Rosenberg

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This upperclass and graduate-level course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities. We will work both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., Web sites and CD-ROMs). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that question the impacts of technology. By the middle of the academic term, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include at least information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, the meaning of the digital revolution, text analysis, and image manipulation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 416 / HISTORY 487 / WOMENSTD 416. Women in Victorian England.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

At the very heart of industrialization and the rise of the middle classes in Victorian England were women: anxiously made into guardians of the spiritual sanctity of the home and into devoted keepers of the family hearth, women were integral to the social and political transformations of nineteenth-century England that enabled its remarkable financial growth. The lives and writings of many Victorian women both challenge and attest to the neat enclosure of women in their homes. Through reading non-fiction prose essays, novels, household manuals, and conduct books, we will consider how Victorian women are imagined in these texts, and how these imaginings intersect with women's social history in the nineteenth-and early-twentieth-centuries. We will pay special attention to the educational, urban, and political reform projects in which women were involved over this period. The reading list will include a course pack and writings by Charlotte Brontë, Mrs. Beeton, Christina Rossetti, Mrs. Humphry Ward, Alfred Tennyson, John Ruskin, and Octavia Hill.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 001 The Politics of Prose. Meets with Comparative Literature 432.001.

Instructor(s): Simon E Gikandi (gikandi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Comparative Literature 432.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 002 Lesbian Literatures.

Instructor(s): Anne C Herrmann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will consider what it means to write and read "as a lesbian" by focusing on female same-sex desire in 20th century literary practices by women. Questions to be addressed are: what is a lesbian text; how does the figure of the lesbian influence how stories are told; how does this figure reflect class and racial, as well as national differences; how is same-sex desire represented by writers who don't identify as lesbian. Topics to be covered include: female homoeroticism; lesbian pulp fiction; relationships between lesbianism and masculinity; historical changes in literary representation. Texts include Hall's Well of Loneliness (1928), Woolf's Orlando (1928), Larsen's Passing (1929), Morrison's Sula (1973), Bannon's Beebo Brinker (1962), Winterson's The Passion (1987), Feinberg's Stone Butch Blues (1993) and Hoffman's Hospital Time (1997), as well as literary critical and theoretical essays, and a film. Class requirements include a class presentation and a final seminar paper composed in several stages. Cost: $100

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 003 Forms of Prose Fiction.

Instructor(s): Nancy B Reisman (nreisman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar, we'll explore a range of forms of prose fiction, from micro fiction and short shorts to short stories, novellas, and novels; and we'll consider the ways in which several contemporary writers shape their work and combine received and invented forms. We'll also explore the common ground between fiction and poetry, between fiction and drama, and discuss the sharing of technique and blurring of boundaries among forms. The seminar is designed with the interests of emerging writers in mind, and the written work for the course will include some short creative assignments as well as analytical discussions.

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ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 001 Fiction.

Instructor(s): Peter Ho Davies (phdavies@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 002 Fiction.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and, to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required. Students who want to enroll in the workshop should get on the waitlist and bring a manuscript to class the first evening. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 001 Writing Beyond the Academy.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

It surely comes as no surprise to you that a writing world exists beyond English, history and econ papers. This class makes writing for that world (the so-called "real world") its emphasis. We will look at a variety of professional fields which require writing: journalism, teaching, feature writing (on politics, travel, sports, whatever), law, medicine, business, and the criticism, whether literary, film, or art. Your interests will shape our agenda. Some of our readings will be professional texts that reference communication situations in all areas; some will be specific to particular fields. We will discuss these texts as well as the texts written by the students in the class. You can tailor your own writing to your particular interests, and we will all benefit from the exchange of differing perspectives on writing, thinking, and reading. Our professional readings will include works by Scott Turow, Anne Fadiman, Muriel Spark, Pauline Kael, Thomas L. Friedman, Maureen Dowd and others. The requirements include three 6-8 page essays, all of which can be revised; responses to each other's writing; participation in class discussion: and regular attendance.

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ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 002 Finding Your Voice.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a continuation of ENGLISH 325 and will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist concentrating in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy concentrator reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage Dictionary, Fourth Edition E

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001 The Poetics of the Invisible.

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 430. The Rise of the Novel.

Section 001 Satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for the concentration in English.

Instructor(s): Lincoln B Faller (faller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The narrative form we call the English novel developed over the course of the eighteenth century in a series of brilliant formal, imaginative, and intellectual experiments. We will read some of the most remarkable of these experimental narratives, including Aphra Behn's Oroonoko (1688), Daniel Defoe's Moll Flanders (1722), Samuel Richardson's Clarissa (1747-49 ), Henry Fielding's Tom Jones (1749), Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy (1759-67), Frances Burney's Evelina (1778), and Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (1813). In reading these works we'll be concerned with a variety of matters aesthetic and cultural, including the elaboration of action into plot; the development of authorial voice and authority; the shaping of reader response; the representation of individual consciousness amid other interacting and competing subjectivities; the use and implications of setting. We'll also be interested in these novels' representation and critique of cultural values and social practices, including their depiction of gender and class relations and, to the limited extent it concerns them, the representation of racial difference; the operations of the law, including its treatment of crime; the distribution and exchange of property; along as well with their treatment of themes large and small like love and marriage, death, good and bad manners, what it means to have justice done or to lead a "good life." Each class will begin with an oral presentation by a panel of students. Students will write weekly reaction papers, except during those weeks when they are giving an oral presentation. There will be a mid-term exam and a final exam, as well as an end-of-term paper or other equivalent project. Approximate cost of books: $80-90.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 432. The American Novel.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001 The Charge of U.S. Modernity.

Instructor(s): Joshua L Miller (joshualm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we'll discuss a range of novels written between 1898 and 1945 and the historical, political, and cultural trends to which they were responding and participating. The historical framework of this course beginning with the Spanish-American War and ending with World War II will provide context for the novels we read. How do these authors define the "modern'? What, for that matter, is a "novel" in twentieth-century U.S. literature? How did these authors participate (and resist) the process of defining who was an "American"? How did crucial trends in technology (mass production, cinema, transportation), science (relativity), and politics influence the novelists who sought to participate in U.S. modernity? How did U.S. authors reconcile the modernist imperative to "make it new" with the history of the Americas? What are the languages of modernity? Assigned readings will include novels by John Dos Passos, Gertrude Stein, Jean Toomer, Djuna Barnes, Ernest Hemingway, Anzia Yezierska, and William Faulkner, in addition to shorter readings by Henry Ford, Theodore Roosevelt, Randolph Bourne, H.L. Mencken, and other contemporaries. The written assignments required for this course will be two essays, several brief reading responses, and a final exam. Registered students must attend one of the first two class meetings in order to remain in the class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 434. The Contemporary Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas F Delbanco (delbanco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine salient examples of the contemporary novel in America--by contemporary I mean those authors who are still alive and by novel I mean fictions of a certain length. The "Great American Novel" does not, I think, exist; we're too various and multiform a society for any single text to encompass or describe us all; think of the various subsets and hyphenated categories in a bookstore's shelf-space and you'll see, I think, what I mean. (Indeed, most people's candidate for the GAN would be a book written more than a hundred years ago, whose title character is a whale and whose principal action takes place offshore...) We'll discuss novels mainly from a writer's perspective--focusing on matters of structure, pace, presentation, and language, as well as subject matter and theme. This course may therefore be of particular interest to undergraduate fiction writers, and some of the written work will be "creative". Our dozen texts will be announced as the time draws near.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 440. Modern Poetry.

Section 001 Satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 443 / THTREMUS 321. History of Theatre I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leigh Woods (lawoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 321.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 443 / THTREMUS 321. History of Theatre I.

Section 002 Meets with Theatre 521.001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 321.992.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 467. Topics in Shakespeare.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Valerie J Traub (traubv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior course work in Shakespeare is recommended. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine Shakespeare's representation of erotic love, desire, and sexual violence in his sonnets, narrative poems, and plays. Focusing on the ways in which gender and sexuality were conceptualized in the late sixteenth century, we will engage in thematic readings of texts that are grounded in an understanding of their original historical context as well as in an appreciation of their continuing relevance. We will pursue many questions, including: How are masculinity and femininity defined in Shakespeare's society? What is the impact of patriarchal marriage and parental power on the choice of a mate? In a period prior to the conceptual division of homosexuality from heterosexuality, how is eroticism conceptualized? What kinds of sexual violence are represented, and why? How are gender and sexuality related to such variables as social rank, race, and national identity? How are gender and sexuality tied to literary genre and dramatic or narrative structure? A variety of writing assignments and vigorous, consistent class participation are required. Cost: 2

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor required.

ENGLISH 471. Nineteenth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 Thought, Deed, and the Written Word: American Selves. Satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): MARIA SANCHEZ

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 472. Twentieth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Anita Norich (norich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 e.e. cummings.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will study the life, ideas, and art of e.e.cummings, one of the great artists and personalities of the 20th century. Cummings is primarily known for his poetry, but he was also a significant painter, playwright, novelist, critic, and aesthetician. During the course, we will study cummings' complete poetic corpus (of almost 1000 poems), one of his novels, The Enormous Room, one of his plays, Him, and some of his criticism, as he delivers it orally in his famous Charles Eliot Norton(non-) lectures. For his life, we will read Richard Kennedy's biography of cummings, Dreams in the Mirror. For his visual art and aesthetics, we will read Milton Cohen's Poet and Painter, which explores cummings' sketches, painting, and artistic ideas. Requirements for the course will be two medium length papers (5-10 pages) during the term and one longer paper (15-20 pages) at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 003 Toni Morrison as Novelist and Critic. Meets with CAAS 458.001.

Instructor(s): Arlene Rosemary Keizer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 004 Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature I: The Russian Years. Meets with Russian 478.001.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 478.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 486. History of Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Richard Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 001 [Honors].

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (ENGLISH 496), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department. English Honors only.

ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Joshua L Miller (joshualm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (ENGLISH 496), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 497. Honors Seminar.

Section 001 Early Modern Literature of Travel.

Instructor(s): David L Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ideas of the foreign, both real and imaginary, exerted a profound influence on eighteenth-century letters in both England and France. In this course, we will examine the development of this fascination with travel and cultural difference through readings of fictional and journalistic accounts by some of the major writers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, including Bunyan, Defoe, Swift, Johnson, Montagu, Sterne, and Voltaire. We will consider topics including the use of travel narrative as a form of social commentary, the role of travel accounts in the development of Enlightenment thought, the aesthetics of the exotic, and relations of power and mastery in encounters with the cultural "other." The class will be conducted as a seminar with an emphasis on detailed discussion of the readings. Students will have the option of submitting a collaborative web-based research project for inclusion on the Eighteenth-Century England website (http://www.umich.edu/~ece) in place of a traditional research paper and/or final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Graduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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ENGLISH 331(413) / FILMVID 331. Film Genres and Types.

Section 001 Horror Films.

Instructor(s): Ira Konigsberg (ikonigsb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 331.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 350 / MEMS 350. Literature in English to 1660.

Section 001 ENGLISH MASTERWORKS OF THE MIDDLE AGES AND RENAISSANCE. satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be an intensive study of some representative masterworks of the Middle Ages and Renaissance in England. While dealing with these texts analytically, we will also explore them in their historical, social, political and cultural contexts. Readings will include a substantial selection from Chaucer's CANTERBURY TALES [in Middle English; learn to read it and dazzle your friends], SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT, some medieval plays, Marlowe's DOCTOR FAUSTUS, a selection of Renaissance lyric poetry [e.g., Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, Marvell], and a Jacobean play by Jonson or Webster, one by each if time allows. English 350 devotes three hours a week to lecture, accompanied by as much interaction as the size of the class allows and the vitality of the bodies in it generates. Groups of twenty-five students will meet a fourth hour under the leadership of seasoned doctoral student GSIs to discuss the material further and to work on the writing assignments for the course. Each student will write two essays of approximately five pages each, a one-hour in-class essay at mid-term and a final examination. Students who have taken ENGLISH 370 with Prof. Bauland in Winter Term of '02 or '03 should NOT enroll for this section of ENGLISH 350.

Approximate book cost: $50 - $60.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 367 / MEMS 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 001 History of Early English Poetry [Honors].

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 002 Things Unattempted Yet in Prose or Rhyme.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 002 Banned Books. Satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): David L Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For as long as free-thinking authors have been moved to write, censors have attempted to stem the tide of dangerous ideas flowing from their pens. In this course, we will read a broad selection of important, well-known books from the period 1600-1830 that have, at some point, been banned, burned, or censored by political or religious authorities. We will explore the history, causes, effects, and cultural implications of various kinds of censorship, and we'll examine each of our readings from the perspective both of its intended audience and of those who have felt threatened or disturbed by the ideas it expressed. The reading list will include selections from the works of some of the following authors: Shakespeare, Milton, Behn, Locke, Defoe, Swift, Richardson, Voltaire, Cleland, Sterne, Rousseau, Paine, Goethe, and Sade. The class will be conducted as a seminar with an emphasis on detailed discussion of the readings. Students will have the option of submitting a collaborative web-based research project for inclusion on the Eighteenth-Century England website (www.umich.edu/~ece) in place of a traditional research paper and/or final exam.

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ENGLISH 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 001 What Was Modernism?

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 002 Reforming Literature: From the Industrial Novel to the Make-it-New Aesthetic.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Here we look to the term reform in two sense--the political and the aesthetic--to explore how politics and aesthetics interrelate in a British literary tradition. We begin with a literature that seeks political reform--early Victorian "social problem" writings with their portraits of societal injustices--and we conclude by examining a literature that is itself being aesthetically reformed--modernist works determined to reenvision the very nineteenth-century styles of literary representation with which our course begins. On the way, we see various means through which literary works engage social and legislative concerns, such as justice and fairness. Likely authors include Gaskell, Dickens, Trollope, George Eliot, J.S. Mill, Pater, Shaw and Woolf.

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ENGLISH 381 / AMCULT 324. Asian American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria S See (ssee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 382 / AMCULT 328. Native American Literature.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Betty L Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 383. Topics in Jewish Literature.

Section 001 Jewish Culture in America: 1945 to the Present.

Instructor(s): Julian Arnold Levinson (jlevinso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 384 / CAAS 384 / AMCULT 406. Topics in Caribbean Literature.

Section 001 Life and Literature in the Contemporary Caribbean Diaspora.

Instructor(s): Ifeoma C Nwankwo

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 406 / LING 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 Reading Old English.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Lisa Makman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class provides an introduction to the major genres of children's literature. Students will read from a wide variety of classical and contemporary works, from The Tale of Peter Rabbit to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone . The genres we will study include fairytales, historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction. The class will cultivate an awareness of story patterns, generic conventions and innovations. Among the topics to be considered are conceptions of child's play, gender and the child's development, imagining the child's imagination, sense and nonsense, and coming of age. The class will also examine broader questions such as the following. What are possible pedagogical functions of literature for children? What meanings are given to childhood in our culture and what is the role played by children's literauture in producing these meanings? How have the meanings given to childhood changed historically? Requirements: response papers, final exam and research paper.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 003 War and 20th Century US Art.

Instructor(s): John H McGuigan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

American culture was profoundly shaped during the 1900s by a series of new wars creating new conditions both for soldiers on the fronts and civilians at home. Starting from that rather obvious premise, this course explores the "how" and "why." The shocking scale and mechanization of World War I, costly non-intervention in the Spanish Civil War and the resulting necessity of World War II, the forgotten Korean War, the domestically divisive Vietnam conflict, the restorative Desert Storm each conflict abroad necessitated a renegotiated sense of self at home. Many of the art works we will study define themselves in opposition to the respective official government line, but through the use of primary sources we will examine both sides of the domestic battle for the cultural and rhetorical upper-hand, as people fight to determine how a conflict will be understood and how it will be remembered. Soldiers' letters, for example, can illuminate the role art played in the lives of soldiers, helping them negotiate the danger of their immediate environment and inform their sense of the larger historical and political forces at work.

This course requires two shorter papers and a 10pp research project using University research collections. Readings could include works by Faulkner, Hemingway, H.D., Dos Passos, Heller, Vonnegut, O'Brien, Komunyakaa, and Bowden, in addition to films and journalism.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 004 Topic?

Instructor(s): Susan Y Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 005 Topic?

Instructor(s): Xiomara A Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 411. Art of the Film.

Section 001 Prison and the Artist.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 Technology & the Humanities.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu), Victor Rosenberg

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This upperclass and graduate-level course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities. We will work both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., Web sites and CD-ROMs). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that question the impacts of technology. By the middle of the academic term, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include at least information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, the meaning of the digital revolution, text analysis, and image manipulation.

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ENGLISH 416 / HISTORY 487 / WOMENSTD 416. Women in Victorian England.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 001 The Politics of Prose. Meets with Comparative Literature 432.001.

Instructor(s): Simon E Gikandi (gikandi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Comparative Literature 432.001.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 002 Lesbian Literatures.

Instructor(s): Anne C Herrmann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will consider what it means to write and read "as a lesbian" by focusing on female same-sex desire in 20th century literary practices by women. Questions to be addressed are: what is a lesbian text; how does the figure of the lesbian influence how stories are told; how does this figure reflect class and racial, as well as national differences; how is same-sex desire represented by writers who don't identify as lesbian. Topics to be covered include: female homoeroticism; lesbian pulp fiction; relationships between lesbianism and masculinity; historical changes in literary representation. Texts include Hall's Well of Loneliness (1928), Woolf's Orlando (1928), Larsen's Passing (1929), Morrison's Sula (1973), Bannon's Beebo Brinker (1962), Winterson's The Passion (1987), Feinberg's Stone Butch Blues (1993) and Hoffman's Hospital Time (1997), as well as literary critical and theoretical essays, and a film. Class requirements include a class presentation and a final seminar paper composed in several stages. Cost: $100

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 003 Forms of Prose Fiction.

Instructor(s): Nancy B Reisman (nreisman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar, we'll explore a range of forms of prose fiction, from micro fiction and short shorts to short stories, novellas, and novels; and we'll consider the ways in which several contemporary writers shape their work and combine received and invented forms. We'll also explore the common ground between fiction and poetry, between fiction and drama, and discuss the sharing of technique and blurring of boundaries among forms. The seminar is designed with the interests of emerging writers in mind, and the written work for the course will include some short creative assignments as well as analytical discussions.

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ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 001 Fiction.

Instructor(s): Peter Ho Davies (phdavies@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 002 Fiction.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 001 Writing Beyond the Academy.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

It surely comes as no surprise to you that a writing world exists beyond English, history and econ papers. This class makes writing for that world (the so-called "real world") its emphasis. We will look at a variety of professional fields which require writing: journalism, teaching, feature writing (on politics, travel, sports, whatever), law, medicine, business, and the criticism, whether literary, film, or art. Your interests will shape our agenda. Some of our readings will be professional texts that reference communication situations in all areas; some will be specific to particular fields. We will discuss these texts as well as the texts written by the students in the class. You can tailor your own writing to your particular interests, and we will all benefit from the exchange of differing perspectives on writing, thinking, and reading. Our professional readings will include works by Scott Turow, Anne Fadiman, Muriel Spark, Pauline Kael, Thomas L. Friedman, Maureen Dowd and others. The requirements include three 6-8 page essays, all of which can be revised; responses to each other's writing; participation in class discussion: and regular attendance.

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ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001 The Poetics of the Invisible.

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 430. The Rise of the Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lincoln B Faller (faller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The narrative form we call the English novel developed over the course of the eighteenth century in a series of brilliant formal, imaginative, and intellectual experiments. We will read some of the most remarkable of these experimental narratives, including Aphra Behn's Oroonoko (1688), Daniel Defoe's Moll Flanders (1722), Samuel Richardson's Clarissa (1747-49 ), Henry Fielding's Tom Jones (1749), Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy (1759-67), Frances Burney's Evelina (1778), and Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (1813). In reading these works we'll be concerned with a variety of matters aesthetic and cultural, including the elaboration of action into plot; the development of authorial voice and authority; the shaping of reader response; the representation of individual consciousness amid other interacting and competing subjectivities; the use and implications of setting. We'll also be interested in these novels' representation and critique of cultural values and social practices, including their depiction of gender and class relations and, to the limited extent it concerns them, the representation of racial difference; the operations of the law, including its treatment of crime; the distribution and exchange of property; along as well with their treatment of themes large and small like love and marriage, death, good and bad manners, what it means to have justice done or to lead a "good life." Each class will begin with an oral presentation by a panel of students. Students will write weekly reaction papers, except during those weeks when they are giving an oral presentation. There will be a mid-term exam and a final exam, as well as an end-of-term paper or other equivalent project. Approximate cost of books: $80-90. This course satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for the concentration in English.

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ENGLISH 432. The American Novel.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001 The Charge of U.S. Modernity.

Instructor(s): Joshua L Miller (joshualm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we'll discuss a range of novels written between 1898 and 1945 and the historical, political, and cultural trends to which they were responding and participating. The historical framework of this course beginning with the Spanish-American War and ending with World War II will provide context for the novels we read. How do these authors define the "modern'? What, for that matter, is a "novel" in twentieth-century U.S. literature? How did these authors participate (and resist) the process of defining who was an "American"? How did crucial trends in technology (mass production, cinema, transportation), science (relativity), and politics influence the novelists who sought to participate in U.S. modernity? How did U.S. authors reconcile the modernist imperative to "make it new" with the history of the Americas? What are the languages of modernity? Assigned readings will include novels by John Dos Passos, Gertrude Stein, Jean Toomer, Djuna Barnes, Ernest Hemingway, Anzia Yezierska, and William Faulkner, in addition to shorter readings by Henry Ford, Theodore Roosevelt, Randolph Bourne, H.L. Mencken, and other contemporaries. The written assignments required for this course will be two essays, several brief reading responses, and a final exam. Registered students must attend one of the first two class meetings in order to remain in the class.

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ENGLISH 434. The Contemporary Novel.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Nicholas F Delbanco (delbanco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 440. Modern Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 443 / THTREMUS 321. History of Theatre I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leigh Woods (lawoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 321.001.

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ENGLISH 443 / THTREMUS 321. History of Theatre I.

Section 002 Meets with Theatre 521.001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 321.992.

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ENGLISH 467. Topics in Shakespeare.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Valerie J Traub (traubv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior course work in Shakespeare is recommended. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine Shakespeare's representation of erotic love, desire, and sexual violence in his sonnets, narrative poems, and plays. Focusing on the ways in which gender and sexuality were conceptualized in the late sixteenth century, we will engage in thematic readings of texts that are grounded in an understanding of their original historical context as well as in an appreciation of their continuing relevance. We will pursue many questions, including: How are masculinity and femininity defined in Shakespeare's society? What is the impact of patriarchal marriage and parental power on the choice of a mate? In a period prior to the conceptual division of homosexuality from heterosexuality, how is eroticism conceptualized? What kinds of sexual violence are represented, and why? How are gender and sexuality related to such variables as social rank, race, and national identity? How are gender and sexuality tied to literary genre and dramatic or narrative structure? A variety of writing assignments and vigorous, consistent class participation are required. Cost: 2

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ENGLISH 471. Nineteenth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 Thought, Deed, and the Written Word: American Selves.

Instructor(s): MARIA SANCHEZ

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 472. Twentieth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Anita Norich (norich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 e.e. cummings.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 003 Toni Morrison as Novelist and Critic. Meets with CAAS 458.001.

Instructor(s): Arlene Rosemary Keizer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 004 Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature I: The Russian Years. Meets with Russian 478.001.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 478.001.

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ENGLISH 486. History of Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Richard Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 001 [Honors].

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (ENGLISH 496), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department. English Honors only.

ENGLISH 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Joshua L Miller (joshualm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (ENGLISH 496), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

ENGLISH 497. Honors Seminar.

Section 001 Early Modern Literature of Travel.

Instructor(s): David L Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ideas of the foreign, both real and imaginary, exerted a profound influence on eighteenth-century letters in both England and France. In this course, we will examine the development of this fascination with travel and cultural difference through readings of fictional and journalistic accounts by some of the major writers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, including Bunyan, Defoe, Swift, Johnson, Montagu, Sterne, and Voltaire. We will consider topics including the use of travel narrative as a form of social commentary, the role of travel accounts in the development of Enlightenment thought, the aesthetics of the exotic, and relations of power and mastery in encounters with the cultural "other." The class will be conducted as a seminar with an emphasis on detailed discussion of the readings. Students will have the option of submitting a collaborative web-based research project for inclusion on the Eighteenth-Century England website (www.umich.edu/~ece) in place of a traditional research paper and/or final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Graduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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