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Fall Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in Sociology


This page was created at 1:25 PM on Thu, Mar 13, 2003.

Fall Academic Term, 2003 (September 2 - December 19)

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SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm Morley (sbluhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in SOC 300. Seniors must elect SOC 300. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 195 or 300. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sociology is the exciting and systematic study of individuals within the context of their society. This introductory course offers new perspectives by which to examine the world on a micro (individual or personal) sociological level, as well as on a macro (global) level. Students are introduced to the Sociological Imagination and its application to social interaction and issues of social inequality (class and stratification, gender and sex, age, race and ethnicity).

In the latter part of the course these principles are applied to two specific areas of examination. The first is the American health system, including availability and affordability of health care, issues of mental health, alternative medical treatments, inequalities in the health care delivery system, and other concerns within the field of Medical Sociology. The second is the American family, which explores family structures, love, commitment, child and domestic abuse, maltreatment, neglect, and violence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 012 – Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in SOC 300. Seniors must elect SOC 300. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 195 or 300. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 023.

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm Morley (sbluhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in SOC 300. Seniors must elect SOC 300. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 195 or 300. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sociology is the exciting and systematic study of individuals within the context of their society. This introductory course offers new perspectives by which to examine the world on a micro (individual or personal) sociological level, as well as on a macro (global) level. Students are introduced to the Sociological Imagination and its application to social interaction and issues of social inequality (class and stratification, gender and sex, age, race and ethnicity).

In the latter part of the course these principles are applied to two specific areas of examination. The first is the American health system, including availability and affordability of health care, issues of mental health, alternative medical treatments, inequalities in the health care delivery system, and other concerns within the field of Medical Sociology. The second is the American family, which explores family structures, love, commitment, child and domestic abuse, maltreatment, neglect, and violence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 102. Contemporary Social Issues: An Introduction to Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 001 – Social Inequality: Race, Labor and Education in Detroit.

Instructor(s): Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take SOC 300 or 401. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through SOC 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The relationship between social inequalities – in economic resources and educational opportunities, in status and respect, and in legal rights and political power – and differences in race and class has long been a central interest of sociologists. This course introduces students to sociology as a mode of inquiry by exploring how sociologists and others analyze the evolution of race, class, and social inequality in the metro Detroit area from the1920s to the present. We ask what causes social inequalities of the sort we find, why they evolve as they do, and how they affect individuals, communities, and the nation. Up to 12 students taking Soc 102 may link with one of the community service/learning projects organized by Project Community (Soc 389) focusing on Detroit schools.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology.

Section 001 – Modernity and Postmodernity.

Instructor(s): Julia Potter Adams (jpadams@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do societies and selves come to be "modern," or not? Why is modernity still a contested concept, the focus of so much desire and anger in the world today? Are we emerging into a new stage of history, something that might be called post-modernity? Students in this seminar will explore various social theories, histories, novels and forms of cultural criticism as we take up these and related questions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology.

Section 002 – Class, Race, Gender, and Modernity.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to the sociological study of inequality through an analysis of three of its fundamental dimensions – class, race, and gender. The course will explore how each of the three dimensions of inequality is related to the development of modern capitalist society as described by Marx and Weber. The course will provide an introduction to basic concepts in class analysis, to contemporary issues in feminist theories of gender, and to recent work on the social construction of race. It will also trace both the similarities and differences among the three dimensions, their relationship to one another and to the underlying dynamics of capitalist modernity. Texts include; Richard Sennet and Jonathan Cobb; The Hidden Injuries of Class. Eric Olin Wright, Class Counts; R.W. Connel, Gender and Power; Oyeronke, Oyewumi, The Invention of Women; David Roediger, The Wages of Whiteness; Ron Takaki, Iron Cages: Race and Culture in Nineteenth Century America; as well as selected readings from Marx and Weber.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology.

Section 003 – Democracy, Diversity & Community.

Instructor(s): David Schoem (dschoem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will examine issues of race, intergroup relations, and social group identity as we explore the possibilities for building community in a democratic society. It also will look at the intersection of gender, class, sexual orientation, religion, and race in this context. Students also will explore issues of civic engagement and community-building in a democratic society, taking into account issues of power, conflict and competing social interests. Students are expected to be active participants in class discussion and will be encouraged to bring in personal experience and perspective to enrich the discussion of theoretical readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology.

Section 004 – Transforming America: Immigrants Then and Now.

Instructor(s): Pedraza

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan.

R&E First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

That America is a nation of immigrants is one of the most common yet truest statements. In this course we will survey a vast range of the American Immigrant experience, that of the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexicans.

Immigration to America can be broadly understood as consisting of four major waves: the first one, that which consisted of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-19th century; the second one, that which consisted of Southern and East Europeans at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th; the third one, the movement from the South to the North of Black Americans and Mexicans precipitated by two World Wars; and the fourth one, from 1965 on, is still ongoing in the present, of immigrants mostly from Latin America and Asia.

At all times, our effort will be to understand the immigrant past of these ethnic groups, both for what it tells us about the past as well as their present and possible future. This course is a First–Year Seminar, limited to 25 entering students at the University. As such, it will be run as a seminar, involving a fair amount of discussion and writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 110 / SI 110. Introduction to Information Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert L Frost (rfrost@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 122 / PSYCH 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001 – Dialogues on Race, Gender, Sexual Orientation, Religion, or Ethnicity.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits. May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 122.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor. Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Mich. Union.

SOC 195. Principles in Sociology (Honors).

Introductory courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students admitted to the Honors Program, or other first- and second-year students with a grade point average of at least 3.2. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take SOC 202 or 300. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is not granted for both SOC 195 and SOC 100, 202, or 300. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor

SOC 210. Elementary Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course during their third year. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in STATS 100, 350, 265, 311, 350, 405, or 412, or ECON 404 or 405.

Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 212 / GERMAN 212. Sports and Society.

Section 001 – Sports and Culture in Advanced Industrial Democracies.

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Few things have characterized mass culture in the 20th century more consistently and thoroughly than sports. Particularly in their team variety, there is not one industrial country in the world that does not possess at least one major team sport which has attained hegemonic dimensions in that country's culture in the course of this passing century.

There can simply be no doubt that team sports as a form of mass culture have been among the most essential ingredients of public life in the 20th century. Why has this been the case? And how did this happen? Moreover, why did the United States deviate from the rest of the industrial world not in terms of the presence of such sports, but in their number and kind? Briefly put, why are baseball, football and basketball (as well as hockey to a certain extent) the hegemonic team sports that defined American mass culture throughout the 20th century, whereas no other industrial country has more than two such hegemonic team sports, most often indeed only one – soccer. Why has this sports map remained so stable throughout a highly volatile and ever-changing century? Will this stability persist into the new millennium or will new forces challenge these hegemonic sports and contest them in their respective cultural space?

In answering these questions, the course will proceed in the following manner: In the first section, we will look at the phenomenon ubiquitous to all advanced industrial societies where disorganized contests, competitions and games mutated into what we have come to know as modern team sports. In this segment, we will see how this transformation was identical in every industrial society and should thus be seen as a fine gauge of modernity: These disorganized games become bureaucratized, ordered, codified, rule-bound by the elites and upper middle class segments of industrial societies between 1860 and 1900. However, these games, though now codified and routinized, still remain part of leisure activities of a small privileged group in society. Once, however, they become embraced by the male, industrial working class, they enter the realm of professionalism, of vocation, of commodification. The industrial working class is the subject that leads these amateur games towards professional sports and thus to an integral part of modern mass culture.

In the second part, we will look at how similar and congruous the development in the United States was with this trajectory, yet how the content emerged so differently. We will dwell briefly on what makes the United States similar and what renders it different vis-à-vis other advanced industrial democracies.

The third segment will look in detail at the four North American culturally hegemonic team sports: baseball, football, basketball in the United States; ice hockey in Canada.

The fourth part will analyze the development of soccer – tellingly called "football" by the rest of the world – in England.

The last section will look at the world in the context of globalization and ask whether new structures might be emerging that will challenge the old; or whether these new developments will exist alongside the old in a much less significant and culturally powerful manner.

Course Requirements: Two five-page papers on the course readings during the term; and a take-home final at the end of the course during the examination period

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 222 / RCSSCI 222. Strategies in Social Interaction: An Introduction to Game Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank W Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit.

Half QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 222.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 231. Investigating Social and Demographic Change in America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William H Frey (billf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit. Restricted to first- and second-year students.

R&E Half QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This computer–based course for first year and sophomores allows participants to investigate how major social, economic, and political changes have affected the demographic structure of the U.S. population in the past four decades. What does this mean for issues related to race, gender, and inequality? How do you fit into the picture? We will address questions such as: How greatly have Black-white income differences become reduced since the 1960s? Is the middle class shrinking? To what extent has the traditional family disintegrated? Will women continue to earn less than men? Will Generation X fare better than the Baby Boomers?

Through readings, lectures, and exercises on the WEB and Windows machines, this computer-based course you will learn how to examine such questions using U.S. Census data and simple statistical analyses. In the process you will come to understand how major dimensions of the nation's social and demographic structure have changed from 1950 to the present. The course involves individual and team exercises as well as two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 303 / CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm Morley

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Issues of race and ethnic relations are a major focus in American society today. This course provides students with a solid academic grounding which is useful in the analysis and interpretation of current topics.

The first portion of this course provides a sociological foundation in which we investigate race theories, biological issues of race, resurgent racism, prejudice, discrimination, immigration, and the relationship between ethnicity and religion. The second part of the course applies this conceptualization to various racial and ethnic groups. In the third segment, issues of health care, aging, social policies, and the projected future of race relations are studied.

Throughout this course attempts are made to supplement research materials and the academic perspective with open student discussions. In a respectful atmosphere students are given the opportunity to both express their views and learn from the experiences of others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 305. Introduction to Sociological Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One sociology course. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 405.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 310. Introduction to Research Methods.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer S Barber

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology; or completion of one social science course in economics, anthropology, political science, psychology or other sociology course; Sociology concentrators are strongly encouraged to elect this course in the Junior year. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with SOC 397. (4). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit.

Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce you to a range of basic research methods used by sociologists, including surveys, experiments, unstructured interviews, focus groupsd, diaries/calendar methods, observation, and archival/historical methods. The course also addresses causality and reasoning in social science research and exposes students to important methodological issues in the field.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 315(415). Economic Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark S Mizruchi (mizruchi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: introductory economics, sociology, or political science. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Economic sociology is concerned with the social bases of economic behavior. It is one of the newest but most vibrant areas of sociology. This course presents an overview of the field. We begin with a discussion of the differences between sociological and economic approaches, followed by samples from the classic works of Adam Smith, Polanyi, Marx, and Weber. We then discuss the rise of the large corporation, focusing on both economic and sociological accounts. Following this unit, we move progressively from the internal workings of the firm toward macro-level discussions of the relation between business and society. Topics covered include issues of corporate control, the social meaning of money, production and financial markets, mergers and divestitures, the role of national cultures in shaping economic behavior, and fundamental questions about the distribution of income and wealth.

Prerequisites: At least one prior course in both sociology and economics or permission of the instructor.

For the most recent syllabus, see http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mizruchi/

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 320 / PSYCH 310. Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor (admission by application). Intended for juniors and seniors. SOC 122 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 310.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor. Requires application/permission of instructor. Contact instructor or website www.umich.edu/~igrc for application information.

SOC 321 / PSYCH 311. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SOC 320 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/

See Psychology 311.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor. Questions regarding anything to do with this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 323 / CAAS 321. African American Social Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alford Young

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 321.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 325. Sociology of Service Learning.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Chesler (mchesler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Course is only for students facilitating SOC 389. Contact Project Community (763-3548) for permission to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor. Course is only for students facilitating Soc 389. Contact Proj Comm (763-3548) for permission to register.

SOC 344. Marriage and the Family: A Sociological Perspective.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in Sociology. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 368(468). Criminology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey D Morenoff (morenoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One sociology introduction. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the sociological study of crime and social control. After reviewing the definition and nature of crime in both classic and contemporary theories, we explore the major theoretical perspectives on the causes of crime and compare their ability to explain criminal activity by considering case studies drawn from books, film, and current events. Some of the specific topics we will explore include crime and policing in local communities; family and cultural influences on crime; the contours of criminal careers; race, class, and gender as they relate to crime in America; and historical trends in violent crime.

Requirements generally include two in–class exams, two papers, and class participation, although these requirements are subject to change. No prerequisite or background in sociology is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Up to four credits of SOC 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/Projectcommunity

SOC 389 is known as Project Community. Students combine three to four hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning, and problem–solving.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in the weekly seminar as well as regular participation at the designated community service site. Students will be asked to complete weekly reflective journal assignments, a midterm paper/project, and a final paper/project.

Questions and override requests must be directed to the Project Community Office, 1024 Hill Street, 647-8771, Sean de Four, seafour@umich.edu.

All students must view the web site: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course_PC.html PRIOR to registering for a SOC 389/Project Community section.

NOTE: All sections of SOC 389 will commence in the first week of class. There will NOT be a delayed start.

Over 35 community service settings are available. They include schools, hospitals, correctional facilities, shelters, advocacy agencies, and care organizations. For details, please see the specific section description on website.

Transportation to off-campus service sites is provided to all students and is coordinated through the Project Community office.

If a particular section is full, please e–mail Sean de Four (seafour@umich.edu) to be added to the waitlist.

EDUCATION

Section 100 - THURSTON ELEMENTARY ENRICHMENT. (3 credits).
Section 101 - ANN ARBOR: PITTSFIELD ELEMENTARY. (3 credits).
Section 102 - AMERICA READS: ISSUES IN LITERACY. (2 credits).
Section 103 - DETROIT: LATINO FAMILY SERVICES: AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM. (3 credits).
Section 104 - DETROIT: HARDING ELEMENTARY. (3 credits).
Section 105 - DETROIT: VETAL SCHOOL. (3 credits).
Section 106 - GUIDANCE CENTER: AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS. (3 credits).
Section 107 - SCARLETT MIDDLE SCHOOL TUTORS. (3 credits).
Section 108 - KCP: COMMUNITY OUTREACH. (3 credits).
Section 109 - HOPE MEDICAL PROGRAM TUTORS. (3 credits).
Section 110 - FEMINIST MENTORS. (3 credits).
Section 111 - GLOBAL OUTREACH: EDUCATING KIDS ABOUT THE WORLD. (3 credits).
Section 112 - TAPPAN MIDDLE SCHOOL TUTORS. (3 credits).
Section 114 - TBA. (3 credits).

HEALTH

Section 200 - UM HOSPITAL: MOTT/WOMEN'S. (3 credits).
Section 201 - UM HOSPITAL: ADULT SERVICES. (3 credits).
Section 202 - ELDERLY: SUNRISE ASSISTED LIVING. (3 credits).
Section 203 - HIV/AIDS EDUCATION (HARC). (3 credits).
Section 204 - FULL CIRCLE: MENTAL HEALTH. (3 credits).
Section 205 - ELDERLY: JEWISH FAMILY SERVICES. (3 credits).
Section 206 - TBA. (3 credits).

HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS

Section 300 - SOS: AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM. (3 credits).
Section 301 - SAFE HOUSE: WOMEN. (4 credits).
Section 302 - SAFE HOUSE: CHILDREN. (4 credits).
Section 303 - OZONE HOUSE: TEEN SHELTER. (4 credits).
Section 304 - SOS: PARENTS AS TEACHERS PROGRAM. (3 credits).
Section 305 - HOMELESS OUTREACH PROGRAM (SAWC). (3 credits).
Section 306 - TBA. (3 credits).

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Section 400 - JUVENILE DETENTION CENTER: WRITING TUTORS. (3 credits).
Section 401 - JUVENILE DETENTION CENTER: RECREATION. (3 credits).
Section 402 - JAIL: CREATIVE WRITING SEMINAR. (3 credits).
Section 403 - W. WAYNE (women) CREATIVE WRITING SEMINAR. (3 credits).
Section 404 - ADRIAN (men) PRISON CREATIVE WRITING. (3 credits).
Section 405 - ADRIAN (men) PRISON DEBATE. (3 credits).
Section 406 - WESTERN WAYNE (women) PRISON DEBATE. (3 credits).
Section 407 - JAIL: DIALOGUE ON MULTICULTURALISM. (3 credits).
Section 408 - GUIDANCE CENTER: JUVENILE DAY TREATMENT PROGRAM. (3 credits).
Section 409 - TBA. (3 credits).

MICHIGAN COMMUNITY SCHOLARS PROGRAM (MCSP)/LUCY

Section 500 - MCSP: ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TUTORING: NORTHSIDE. (3 credits).
Section 501 - MCSP: MENTORING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS: PEACE NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER. (3 credits).
Section 502 - MCSP: MIDDLE SCHOOL HOMEWORK CLUB: FORSYTHE. (3 credits).
Section 503 - LUCY: TBA. (3 credits).

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Section 600 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: WARREN CONNOR DEVELOPMENT CORP.. (4 credits).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For undergraduate students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Student should contact faculty member with whom they want to work to arrange topic and workload.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SOC 398. Senior Honors in Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurie A Morgan

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors standing in Sociology. SOC 210 and 310, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (SOC 399), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a second course of a three–course sequence (Sociology 397, 398, 399) designed to guide the students through the completion of their Honors thesis. The focus of this seminar will be on collection and analysis of data for the thesis. Time will be spent every week sharing research experiences and problems, and doing problem-solving.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor

SOC 423 / AMCULT 421. Social Stratification.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yu Xie (yuxie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course presents alternative sociological explanations and interpretations of social inequality, differentiation, hierarchy, and stratification. In particular, it considers both interactional and structural approaches to class, caste, and race/ethnicity. The course examines the values, experiences, and institutions characterizing these phenomena with a view towards better appreciating factors which shape social reproduction and order as well as social mobility and structural change in different societies. The readings present historical and cross-cultural materials that encourage critical reflection on popular and scientific notions of status and rank and on recent sociological debates about race and ethnicity in the United States.

The first third of the course introduces important classic and contemporary theories of inequality and class (including Marx, Weber, Giddens, Blau and Duncan, Bourdieu). The second third of the course concentrates on the so-called caste system of India through several empirical studies of rural social life and two synthetic interpretations (Dumont's Homo Hierarchicus: The Caste System and Its Implications and Milner's Status and Sacredness: A General Theory of Status Relations and an Analysis of Indian Culture ).

Then the final part considers the approaches and models used to study class and caste as socio-cultural phenomena in relation to the contemporary sociology of race/ethnicity in American society. That is, how can what is learned about class and caste as forms of stratification improve the study of race and ethnicity, and how do contemporary American racial and ethnic problems make new demands on the sociology of stratification? The course as a whole aims to recognize and evaluate some implications of applying different concepts and methods, which likely reflect different social interests and positions, to depict or model the structured/structuring social differences that are often realized as inequality and stratification.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 426 / POLSCI 339 / ASIAN 428. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth G Lieberthal

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Political Science 339.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 430. Introduction to Population Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara A Anderson (barba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 530.

Half QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the major population processes: mortality, fertility, and migration. It is an introduction to the technical and substantive aspects of demography.

If you look at the size of the population of a geographic area at two points in time, people are added to that population through births and migrants into the area; people are removed from that population through deaths and migrants out of the area. The study of the determinants of the basic population processes of mortality, fertility, and migration is, thus, actually the study of the determinants of population growth and decline.

There are large differences throughout the world in the rate of population growth and in the level of fertility and mortality of the population. The way fertility, mortality, and migration interrelate to result in population growth is important as a background for understanding many social, economic, and political issues. This course concentrates on the causes of population processes rather than on the effects of population processes. Sociology

Population Problems concentrates on the effects of population processes. You will be introduced to basic demographic measures of each of these processes and methods of analyzing them. No formal background in statistics is required, but much of the material is quantitative. The ability to read and understand tables is essential, as well as willingness to try to understand explanations of the results of statistical analyses.

This course does not aim to produce expert population analysts who can do complicated computations. Rather, it aims that students will understand methodological approaches and how to interpret demographic measures and will understand many of the major theoretical perspectives that are important in population research and the evidence that supports or does not support various theoretical perspectives. After taking the course, a student should be able to read an article in a newspaper or magazine that deals with population issues and understand what the issue is about and possess the knowledge and critical perspective to be able to assess the likely validity of the article and what possible problems or additional considerations might be.

There are several in-class exams and one project assignment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 440. Sociology of Work.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ching Kwan Lee (chinglee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the relations between work, social inequalities and political economies. At the core of sociology of work is the question of control, or power, a theme that runs through the course as we discuss different types of work (industrial, service, caring and professional work). Beginning with a discussion on the nature of work and some classical formulations of the significance of work, we examine how employers and workers wrestle with the perennial problem of control in different work contexts. We are also interested in how work is inextricably connected to three patterns of inequalities: class, gender, race and ethnicity. Not only does the organization of work play a central role in constituting and reproducing these systems of power, it also shapes the ways people resist and transform them. We will read empirical studies that address these issues in the US and elsewhere. Requirements: attendance, several short written assignments, mid-term and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 447 / WOMENSTD 447. Sociology of Gender.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karin A Martin (kamartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will ask two central questions about gender relations – Why is there gender inequality? and What are women's experiences of that inequality? We will examine many (often contradictory) answers to these questions. The course will be broken into four sections – the State; Work; Family; and Body/Sexuality – that represent the main areas of social life that have been theorized as the locus of women's oppression. We will look for answers to a wide range of questions that will shed light on our basic question about how gender inequality is constructed and maintained. Some specific questions we will ask are: How do women and men decide who does the housework? Why do MacDonalds' workers think cooking is a man's job? Is mothering political? Is breastfeeding? When is rape a war crime? How do race, class, and sexuality interact with gender? Do cosmetics, shaving, and dieting maintain gender inequality?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 452. Law and Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel Sharphorn (dsharphn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Law and social psychology intersect around issues of norms and justice, and this will be a focus of this course. We shall examine the concepts of norms, responsibility, and justice in both a social psychological and legal context and will look at how findings from social psychology, which is a science, bear on issues that arise in the law, a normative system of social control. We will look at legal processes in general and will consider the roles of different actors in legal systems: civil parties; criminal victims; lawyers; judges; and juries. Focus will be given to the central process of legal systems: the trial; jury selection; eyewitness testimony; the presentation of evidence; jury deliberations; and so on.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 460. Social Change.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 475 / MEDCARE 475. Introduction to Medical Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Renee Anspach (ranspach@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore social aspects of health, aging, and the health care system in American society. We will examine such issues as the social causation of disease, relationships between doctors and patients, the health professions, health care among women and the poor, current health care crisis in a national and cross-cultural perspective.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 001 – Topic? [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Anthony S Chen

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Graduate Course Listings for SOC.


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University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

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Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

RONG> (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Graduate Course Listings for SOC.


Page


This page was created at 3:33 PM on Mon, Mar 10, 2003.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2003 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.