English Language Institute (Division 363)

110. Integrated Academic Skills I. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have been conditionally accepted to the University but who do not yet have sufficient language proficiency to enroll in more than one or two academic/content courses. The course focuses on improving skills needed across disciplines, including speaking informally and in discussion, conversational listening and lecture comprehension, reading and vocabulary building, and writing. Class meetings are six hours per week. Students are graded on a credit/no credit basis. A student receives a passing grade if she or he has attended classes regularly, successfully completed specified assignments and performed satisfactorily on a final evaluation task. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Axelson)

310(Ling. 332). Reading and Vocabulary Development. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who could profit from instruction in reading strategies appropriate for processing academic texts and in the structure of English academic vocabulary. Students will be evaluated on their successful completion of regular assignments and a midterm and final exam. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Reinhart)

312(Ling. 344). Academic Grammar I. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who still lack accurate control of key grammatical structures associated with both spoken and written academic English. Course topics will include the use of modals, tense and voice usage, nominalizations, parallel structure and patterns of cohesion. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Reinhart)

320(Ling. 340). Writing for Academic Purposes I. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their writing skills to perform successfully in academic work. There is instruction and practice in the writing of a range of texts for academic purposes, e.g., extended definitions, introductions, descriptions of processes, and data commentaries. Grades are based on regular attendance, satisfactory completion of specified writing assignments, and satisfactory performance on a final evaluation task or given project. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Swales, Axelson)

321. Writing for Academic Purposes II. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is a sequel to ELI 320, Writing for Academic Purposes I. Students may be assigned to the course based on their performance in ELI 320, or the Academic Entry Examination. A writing course designed to improve proficiency in a range of academic text-types such as critiques, exam essays, reviews, abstracts, more complex introductions and discussions. Unlike ELI 320, attention is also given to longer pieces of writing. Evaluated by assignments and final paper. [Cost:1] [WL:3]

322(Ling. 330). Term Paper Writing. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who could profit from instruction in writing term papers. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Students are introduced to the steps for developing a well organized and properly documented term paper. These include an introduction to library resources, choosing and limiting topics, reading, note-taking, paraphrasing, summarizing sources, etc. Grades are based on regular attendance, successful completion of specified assignments, and satisfactory completion of a final term paper. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Prochnow)

330. Language and Communication I. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native undergraduate and graduate students. The focus will be on interpersonal communication skills including: two-way interactions, group interaction, student-professor consultations and student-student negotiations. Classes meet two hours per week for ten weeks. Evaluation will be ongoing in terms of class participation, completion and quality of assignments and a final assessment of proficiency. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Madden)

332(Ling. 334). Lecture Comprehension. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their listening and note-taking skills in order to perform successfully in their academic work. Class meetings are three hours a week for seven weeks. Instruction focuses on listening skills within an academic context: 1) subject matter comprehension, 2) paralinguistic cues in academic interactions, 3) cross-cultural differences. Grades are based on regular attendance, successful completion of specified assignments, and satisfactory completion of a final examination. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Reinhart)

334(Ling. 336). Speaking in Academic Contexts. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their speaking skills in order to perform successfully in their academic work. Class meetings are twice a week for ten weeks. Instruction focuses on speaking skills within an academic context. Course material includes: 1) academic discussion, 2) summarizing, 3) paraphrasing, and 4) oral presentations. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Madden)

336(Ling. 338). Pronunciation I. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed to serve two purposes. The first is to meet short range goals of improving speech intelligibility through modification of articulation (i.e., selected vowels, consonants, consonant clusters, syllabics, etc.) and vocal qualities (i.e., selected features of phrasing, stress, unstress, reductions, rhythm, linking, intonation, etc.). The second purpose of the course is to guide students in developing processes which will enable them to continue self-modification of pronunciation after formal course work ends. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Morley)

337. Pronunciation II. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is in sequence with 336 and will focus on three areas: a) instruction and practice in the use of English vocal prosodics (especially volume, rate, phrasing, stress, rhythm, and intonation) to improve fluency in spoken English; b) instruction and practice in application of mechanics of speech articulation (especially precision of articulation and clarity of articulation) to improve accuracy in spoken English; c) instruction and practice in the use of speech formatting and speech stylistics of delivery to improve communicability. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Morley)

380(Ling. 180). Introduction to International Teaching Assistants Instruction. ITA screening exam and permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for and restricted to graduate students who are not native speakers of English and who are being considered for teaching assistantships at the University. Students will be assigned to the course based on their performance on an ITA screening examination administered by the Testing Division of the English Language Institute and judged in concert with representatives of the department in which the student would teach. The main purposes of the course are to develop comprehension of spoken pedagogic discourse in English, to engage in appropriate communicative acts needed for effective interaction (both to groups and in one-on-one situations), and to improve language effectiveness in classroom activities. Examples of these acts are topic-introductions, definitions, exemplifications and initial responses to questions. The course is graded credit/no credit. It may be repeated for credit with the instructor's permission. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Morley)

383. ITA Interacting Skills. ITA screening exam and permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for and restricted to graduate students who are non-native speakers of English and who are being considered for teaching assistantships at the University. Students will be assigned to the course based on their performance on an ITA screening examination administered by the Testing Division of the English Language Institute and evaluated in concert with representatives of the department in which the student would teach. The purpose of this course is to teach students the nature of interactive language use in office hour tutorial and laboratory settings, and to provide them with opportunities to practice these skills. The course will be graded credit/no credit and may be repeated with the permission of the instructor. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Axelson)

393. MBA Writing for Non-Native Speakers. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1-2). (Excl).Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for first-year non-native speakers enrolled in the MBA program. The aim of the course is to prepare students for writing tasks they will do as part of their first term studies. Types of writing generally include persuasive memos, essay exam questions, case analyses, and individual and group papers. Features of writing which will be emphasized are audience consideration, organization, sentence and paragraph development, the characteristics of essay exam questions, grammatical accuracy, and vocabulary development. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Reinhart)


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