ASIAN LANGUAGES AND CULTURES

Courses in Buddhist Studies (Division 332)

230(320)/Asian Studies 230/Phil. 230/Rel. 230. Introduction to Buddhism. Buddhist Studies 220 or equivalent. (4). (HU).

An introduction to the Buddhist religion, with attention to its moral and philosophical teachings, its modes of practice (e.g., meditation and ritual), and its social and institutional structures. The course takes a historical approach, concentrating on the origins of the Hinayana, Mahayana, and Tantric traditions in India, and the subsequent development of those traditions in Southeast Asia, Tibet, and East Asia. Students attend three hours of lecture and a one-hour discussion section each week. There will be quizzes and essay style examinations, including a midterm and final. No previous knowledge of the subject is required. (Foulk)

405. Classical Tibetan. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course is designed to train students of Buddhist Studies in the basic skills necessary for reading Tibetan literature; it is not a class in spoken (colloquial) Tibetan. The plan of the course assumes that the student's primary interest is in the study of Buddhist literature. Accordingly, much time will be spent in reading Buddhist literature (autochthonous as well as in translation from Indic languages). The course offers explanations in the phonology of literary Tibetan ("Lhasa Dialect"), nominal derivation, syntax of nominal particles, verbal conjugation and suffixes, and the standard script (dbu-can). All exercises will be taken directly from classical sources. [Cost:2] [WL:4] (Lopez)

488. Tibetan Buddhism. Buddhist Studies 230, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course will survey the development of Buddhism in Tibet, from the eighth century to the present. Since Buddhism entered Tibet from India, the course will begin with an introduction to those doctrines and practices of Indian Buddhism that would come to hold an important place in the Tibetan tradition. The course will go on to examine the process of transmission of Buddhism from India to Tibet, and will then consider the rise of the major sects of Tibetan Buddhism, comparing their approaches to a wide range of issues of Buddhist philosophy and practice. Uniquely Tibetan institutions, such as that of the reincarnate lamas (including the Dalai Lamas), will be studied in detail. The course will conclude with an examination of the Tibetan diaspora, beginning with 1959, and the problems of preserving a religious tradition in exile. The format will be one of lecture and discussion. Students will write several short papers, a research paper, and take a final examination. Prerequisite: Buddhist Studies 230 or permission of instructor. [Cost:4] [WL:3] (Lopez)

Courses in Chinese (Division 339)

101. Beginning Chinese. (5). (FL).

Chinese 101 is an introductory course in speaking, understanding, reading and writing Chinese. The student is expected to achieve control of the sound system, basic sentence patterns and basic vocabulary of Standard Mandarin Chinese (up to lesson 13 in both books). Starting the 5th week, we will learn to read and write the characters. In Chinese 101, the major emphasis is on SPEAKING and AURAL COMPREHENSION. We recommend that students listen to the tapes one hour per day. This is a five-credit-hour course. We meet one hour each day. Tuesdays and Thursdays are lectures; Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays are recitations. Students are required to register for both a lecture section and a recitation section. Attendance is taken everyday and NO AUDITS ARE ALLOWED. Textbooks: (a) John DeFrancis, BEGINNING CHINESE (Yale Univ. Press) (b) John DeFrancis, BEGINNING CHINESE READER, Part I and II (Yale Univ. Press). Materials covered (Fall Term): BEGINNING CHINESE, Lessons 1-13. BEGINNING CHINESE READER, Lessons 1-12. [Cost:2] [WL:1] (Tao)

201. Second-Year Chinese. Chinese 102 or equivalent. (5). (FL).

This course is a continuation of work begun in Chinese 101-102. Students electing the course should have mastered the spoken language material presented in DeFrancis' BEGINNING CHINESE or a similar introductory text and should be able to recognize and write about 400 characters and 1200 combinations. The primary goal of the course is achievement of a basic level of reading competence within a vocabulary of 800 characters and accompanying combinations. A closely integrated secondary goal is continued improvement of aural understanding and speaking competence. These goals are approached through classroom drill and recitation, out-of-class exercises, and work in the language laboratory. Daily class attendance is required. Students are graded on the basis of daily classroom performance, periodic quizzes and tests, and homework assignments. The text is CHINESE LINGUISTICS PROJECT, Princeton, INTERMEDIATE CHINESE. (Liang)

405. Third-Year Chinese. Chinese 202 or 362. (5). (Excl).

Chinese 405 and 406 are a two-term sequence constituting the third year of the Chinese program. All four basic skills reading, writing, listening, and speaking are stressed, but the most time is devoted to learning to read various styles of modern Chinese, including fiction, essays, and documentary and journalistic materials. (Students who want more spoken language work are encouraged to enroll also for Chinese 378, (ADVANCED SPOKEN CHINESE.) Readings are selected from a large variety of textbook and non-textbook materials, most of them in course pack form. (Baxter)

431. Contemporary Social Science Texts. Chinese 406 or equivalent. (5). (Excl).

Chinese 431-432, Contemporary Social Science Texts, is a two-term advanced Chinese language course sequence focusing on Chinese society since 1949. It is intended for students who have an interest in the social sciences as they apply to China, and who have successfully completed Chinese 405-406 (Third-Year Chinese) or the equivalent. The 431-432 sequence may be taken either before or after Chinese 461-462 (Readings in Modern Chinese). Though reading skills are especially emphasized, the course also aims to develop practical listening, speaking, and writing skills needed by professionals in China-related fields. Contemporary Chinese texts are read and discussed in Chinese; there are also written assignments in Chinese. When possible, Chinese visiting scholars will be invited for lectures and discussions in Chinese in their areas of special interest; these talks will be videotaped to allow intensive further study.

451. Literary Chinese. Chinese 202 or 362. (4). (Excl).

This is a course primarily for specialists, requiring knowledge of Modern Chinese at least through the Second Year level. Through the use of Shadick's A FIRST COURSE IN LITERARY CHINESE and selected handouts, the styles of written Chinese of imperial China from prose to poetry are selectively introduced. Class is taught in small recitation groups requiring constant preparation by the student. Quizzes, tests, and hand-in exercises on a weekly basis, plus a final exam, are used to measure progress. Emphasis is on understanding of the tests, as well as the ability to render them clearly into English. This course is the first half of a two-term sequence that is prerequisite to more advanced Chinese courses. [Cost:3] [WL:3] (Rolston)

461. Readings in Modern Chinese. Chinese 406 or equivalent. (5). (Excl).

Graded readings at an advanced level deal with a variety of materials to improve command of structure and vocabulary in a range of standard colloquial styles. Primary emphasis is on reading and understanding and increasing reading speed, but development of speaking and writing skills also stressed. Weekly assignments (compositions in Chinese and translations into English) are required. This course is the first half of a two-term sequence.

468/Phil. 468. Classical Chinese Thought (To A.D. 220) Upperclass standing; no knowledge of Chinese required. (3). (HU).

See Philosophy 468. (Munro)

471. Classical Chinese Literature in Translation. No knowledge of Chinese required. (3). (HU).

Largely through lectures, this course will examine the highlights of early Chinese literature from antiquity to the 13th century. We will begin with THE BOOK OF CHANGES, THE BOOK OF SONGS, and a few ancient philosophical texts (which are written in brilliant literary styles) from the millennium before Christ, the millennium in which China made an astonishing "philosophic breakthrough" in its civilization. We will then undertake to follow the development of the various forms of poetry, fiction, and other kinds of prose during the subsequent centuries. The principal aim is to enable students to become familiar with, and also to be able to enjoy, these masterpieces of literature that illustrate the range and depth of the Chinese imagination, the inner life of the individual as well as the outer social and political life of China through the ages. Two short papers and a final exam are required. Sample readings include Cyril Birch, ed., ANTHOLOGY OF CHINESE LITERATURE, Vol. I; two major texts in Taoist mysticism: LAO TZU: TAO TE CHING and the "Inner Chapters" of the CHUANG TZU: BASIC WRITINGS; Burton Watson, THE COLUMBIA BOOK OF CHINESE POETRY; and other materials in a course pack. (Lin)

476/RC Hums. 476/Asian Studies 476. Writer and Society in Modern China. (4). (HU).

This is an invitation to study some major examples of twentieth-century Chinese literature (primarily fiction), a literature produced during a period of great historical upheaval and that has itself been a battleground for political, cultural, and aesthetic issues. While taking note of the complex ways in which this fiction reflects social change, we for our own pleasure want to study our examples carefully to understand and appreciate their artistry and diversity as works of literature. Through our readings we will be examining such issues as the breakdown of tradition, the impact of Western literature, and the responses to a world seen as undergoing revolution. Here are some questions we will be asking: What kind of external reality is projected by these texts? What demands are placed on form and content by political pressures? What is the role and self-conception of the writer? And, considering the often fatal struggle involved, why write? Readings will include THE TRAVELS OF LAO TS'AN (Old Derelict), "A Madman's Diary" (Lu Xun), FAMILY (Ba Jin), RICKSHAW (Lao She), SANGGAN RIVER (Ding Ling), etc., some stories from Taiwan, and conclude with fiction of the 1980s. Class format: lecture/discussion. Requirements: three short papers, a final exam. No knowledge of Chinese is required. [Cost:3] [WL:1] (Y. Feuerwerker)

480. Upperclass Seminar in Chinese Humanities. Two of Chinese 471, 472, 473; or permission of instructor. Knowledge of Chinese is not required. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

The theme for this year's offering of this seminar will be "Law and Literature in Traditional China." Students will read and discuss analytical and descriptive literature on law and society in the West and China, descriptive and theoretical writings on creative works Western and Chinese in a variety of literary genres dealing with crime and punishment, and a wide selection in translation of Chinese plays, short stories and novels dealing with these themes. The course will comparative in nature. Specific topics to be explored include the problems of torture and corruption and the centrality of confession in the Chinese judicial system, as well as more literary topics such as the interaction of oral and written literature, popular vs. literati treatment of similar material, and generic transformations of the same story. The course is listed with the ECB as a Junior/Senior Writing Course. Students will be required to write three small papers and one more extensive paper. An oral report will also be required. Active participation of students in class discussion is expected. [Cost:3] [WL:3] (Rolston)

588. Sinological Tools and Methods. Chinese 452 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

An introduction to the materials and techniques for reading and research in premodern history, literature, and thought. Emphasis is placed on guiding students through the transition from reading supervised and glossed texts to independent reading, with recourse to commentaries and lexical aids essential for the interpretation of primary sources. Principles of traditional Chinese bibliography outline the survey of a broad range of textual materials, including histories, encyclopediae, collectanea, gazetteers, digests, and collected works. Beyond improvement of technical skills, the course seeks to achieve an overall understanding of traditional sources and efficient access to their contents, the types of research they will support, and the state of the art in various Sinological fields. [WL:1] (DeWoskin)

Courses in Japanese (Division 401)

101. Beginning Japanese. (5). (FL).

A thorough grounding is given in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The aim of the oral component is to provide the student with the speaking and comprehension skills necessary to function effectively in practical situations in a Japanese-speaking environment. Attention is given to the social and cultural differences in the use of the language. In the reading and writing component the two KANA syllabaries (KATAKANA and HIRAGANA) and elementary characters (KANJI) are introduced. The goal of this component is to develop proficient reading skills through practice reinforced by oral and written short question-answer exercises. Students are required to practice with audio/video tapes a minimum of two hours for each class hour (10 hours per week). From the first day, recitation sessions are conducted entirely in Japanese; no English is permitted. Recitation sessions emphasize speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speed with near native pronunciation, accent, intonation, rhythm and appropriate body language. Analyses, explanations, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures with a linguist. Texts: Eleanor Harz Jorden and Mari Noda, JAPANESE: THE SPOKEN LANGUAGE, PART I-II; Eleanor Harz Jorden and Hamako Ito Chaplin, READING JAPANESE. [Cost:2] [WL:1]

201. Second-Year Japanese. Japanese 102 or equivalent. (5). (FL).

Further training is given in all the language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for students who have acquired a basic language proficiency. The aim of the oral component is to provide the student with the speaking and comprehension skills necessary to function effectively in more advanced practical situations in a Japanese-speaking environment. In the reading and writing component, the emphasis is on reading elementary texts, developing an expository style, and writing short answers/essays in response to questions about these texts. Discussions on the social and cultural use of language are provided. Students are required to practice a minimum of two hours for each class hour (12 hours per week). Recitation sessions are conducted entirely in Japanese; no English is permitted. Recitation sessions emphasize speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speed with near-native pronunciation, accent, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. Analyses, explanations, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures with a linguist. Texts: Eleanor Harz Jorden and Mari Noda, JAPANESE: THE SPOKEN LANGUAGE: PARTS II-III; Eleanor Harz Jorden and Hamako Ito Chaplin, READING JAPANESE. [Cost:2] [WL:1]

378. Advanced Spoken Japanese. Japanese 202 or 362. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Instruction in storytelling, lecturing, and speechmaking, with emphasis on both the construction of discourse and Japanese patterns of oral delivery. The class will also include discussions of socio-cultural differences and difficulties Americans have integrating into the Japanese environment. [Cost:2] [WL:1]

401. Japanese Literature in Translation: Classical Periods to 1600. A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (3). (HU).

A survey of Japanese literature from the eighth century through the sixteenth. All assigned readings are in English translation, and no previous knowledge of Japan or the Japanese language is required. Special attention is given to the great works of the Japanese literary tradition, including the MAN 'YOSHU, the eighth century anthology of native poetry; THE TALE OF GENJI, the novel of court life from the early eleventh century; diaries and essays from the Heian period (ca. 800-1200); the epic war tales of the thirteenth century; and some of the major noh plays of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. This course, together with Japanese 402, its sequel, are recommended to all students with a general interest in literature or in Japanese culture. Classes are in a lecture and discussion format, with ample opportunity for questions from students. The course has a midterm and a final examination, emphasizing essay questions. Also, one short paper of some 8 to 10 pages is required. In addition to a course pack, required texts include: E.G. Seidensticker, trans., THE TALE OF GENJI; and D. Keene, trans., YOSHIDA KENKO'S ESSAYS IN IDLENESS. The course is required for concentrators in Japanese. (E. Ramirez-Christensen)

405. Third-Year Japanese. Japanese 202 or equivalent. (5). (Excl).

Advanced training is given in all the language skills. Practice in the use of spoken Japanese is contextualized within simulated Japanese social settings. A variety of selected modern texts (essays, fiction, and newspapers) are read with emphasis on expository style. The goal is to produce self-sufficient readers who can read and discuss most texts with the aid of a dictionary. Students are required to practice with audio/visual tapes a minimum of two hours for each class hour (10 hours per week). Recitation sessions emphasize speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speed with near-native pronunciation, accent, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. Analyses, explanations, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures with a linguist. Texts: Eleanor Harz Jorden and Mari Noda, JAPANESE: THE SPOKEN LANGUAGE: PART III; Eleanor Harz Jorden and Hamako Ito Chaplin, READING JAPANESE; selected reading material for Third-Year Japanese. [Cost:2] [WL:1]

407. Advanced Readings in Modern Japanese Literature. Japanese 406. (4). (Excl).

This course introduces the student to modern Japanese fiction (largely short stories) and other materials written by outstanding writers for a mature Japanese audience. The emphasis is upon a literary approach, using close reading and translation, in class, of Japanese texts. Occasional papers and written translations of supplementary texts are required. The pace of reading is intended to help the student build up reading speed and comprehension. The course will also teach the student how to use dictionaries and other basic research aids effectively. [Cost:1] [WL:1] (Ito)

461. Social Science Readings in Japanese. Japanese 406. (4 each). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

This course helps students to develop reading skills necessary to conduct research in Japanese social science topics. Readings are assigned from newspapers and journals in a variety of fields. The emphasis is on the acquisition of specialized terminology and clarification of problems which arise in interpreting these readings. Students are required to attend three hours of class a week. Homework includes a minimum of two hours of preparation per class hour. Students are expected to prepare the readings so they can participate actively in discussion in Japanese in class. There are also weekly translation and Japanese essay assignments on the readings covered in class. [Cost:1] [WL:3,4] (Oshiro)

541. Classical Japanese. Japanese 406 and 408, or permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

An introduction to the classical written language, with emphasis upon grammar, syntax, and various classical written styles. A reading knowledge of modern Japanese (equivalent to at least three years of study) is a prerequisite. Class meetings are devoted to reading, translating from Japanese into English, and grammatical analysis. A selection of literary works from the tenth through the sixteenth centuries are read, with stress on accurate translation, close analysis of grammatical structure, and careful attention to literary qualities. This course is required of graduate concentrators in Japanese and is a prerequisite (with Japanese 542) to advanced work in pre-modern Japanese literature. It is also highly recommended to graduate students of pre-modern Japanese history, Japanese art history, Buddhism, etc. It may also be taken by undergraduates with sufficient advanced preparation in the modern language.

552. Medieval Japanese Prose. Japanese 542. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

Readings in the various prose genres of the medieval period (1200-1600), including GUNKI MONOGATARI or warrior epics, SETSUWA stories from the oral tradition, essays, travel journals, and religious writing. The seminars will take up, among other issues, the phenomenon of citation and its inscription of canonical texts in the secular literature, in relation to the larger questions of interpretation, knowledge, and morality in the medieval world-view. Topic for Fall 1990: the HEIKE MONOGATARI: Historical Epic, Warrior Romance, or Buddhist Tract? (Ramirez-Christensen)

554. Modern Japanese Literature. Japanese 408 or permission of instructor. (3 each). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

This course provides students the opportunity to read major works of modern Japanese literature in the original and to discuss them in a seminar setting. The topic for the course changes each term. The seminar may focus on a single prominent writer such as Mori Ogai, Natsume Soseki, or Tanizaki Jun'ichiro; survey such literary movements as Japanese Naturalism or the Shirakaba school; or explore such issues as the image of the individual, the vision of the past, or the uses of the first person narrator in the modern Japanese novel. Participants in the seminar should be prepared to read a novel a week in Japanese, contribute regularly to discussions, and present frequent oral critiques of the texts discussed. A twenty-page paper is required. [Cost:3] [WL:1] (Ito)

Courses in South and Southeast Asia (Division 483)

Language Courses

101(301). Beginning Thai. (4). (FL).

Standard Thai, the language of Thailand, is typical of mainland Asia in its basic structure (pronunciation, grammar), but it also shows its ties to Indian culture in its alphabetic script and much of its vocabulary. The language offers a window onto a culture that has maintained much of its autonomy from Western influence, while being at the same time accessible to the open-minded inquirer (it is also worth mentioning that Thailand currently has one of Asia's fastest growing economies). The focus of the course is one use of the spoken language in everyday situations. Upon successful completion of the two-term sequence, students will be able to conduct conversations dealing with basic 'survival' concerns, such as food, transportation, lodging, giving and receiving directions, etc., and will be able to read short elementary passages and use a dictionary. Although class activities are mainly oral, students will also learn the Thai script, which is used in the written course materials. The beginnings of acquaintance with Thai culture, history, geography, etc. are offered, both in the content of the language lessons and in supplementary English-language presentations (talks, films). [Cost:2] [WL:4] (Solnit)

103(303). Beginning Indonesian. (4). (FL).

Indonesian is the national language of Indonesia, a country noted for its rich and deep cultural heritage as well as for its remarkable cultural diversity. With its 180,000,000 speakers, Indonesian is the sixth most prevalently spoken of world languages. The relatively simple syntactic and grammatical structures which characterize Indonesian make it an accessible language for native speakers of English. The elementary course comprises a two-term sequence designed to provide the student with a basic working knowledge of the Indonesian language. The course aims at the acquisition of the four basic language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing in modern Indonesian. The class emphasizes aural-oral exercises and practice and the learning of culture throughout the course. The text used is keyed to a set of tapes for use in the language lab and concentrates on practical knowledge of the language. Evaluation is based on classroom performance, homework assignments, tests, and a final exam. [Cost:2] (Florida)

105(305). Elementary Hindi-Urdu. (4). (FL).

South and Southeast Asia 105 is the first term in the sequence of Hindi-Urdu courses offered by the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures. The course meets four hours week in two sessions. If enrollments warrant, there will be a second section intended for students who have some knowledge of the spoken language but do not know the writing system. In the first year only the Devanagari writing system (for Hindi) is introduced. Nastaliq (for Urdu) comes in the second year. The course is also concentrates on developing skills in speaking and aural comprehension. Evaluation is based on attendance, written homework assignments, quizzes, dictations, and examinations. There are no prerequisites (no previous knowledge of Hindi is required). [Cost: 2] [WL:1] (Taj)

107(307). Beginning Tagalog. (4). (FL).

Tagalog is the national language of the Philippines. Elementary Tagalog is a two-term sequence designed to give the student who has little or no knowledge of Tagalog the necessary basis for learning to speak it and to have a functional acquaintance with the cultural context in which it functions. Tagalog is particularly interesting in the way it has integrated the broad influences of both Spanish and English into its own syntactic and semantic systems. The oral approach is greatly emphasized in the classroom, using questions and answers and short dialogues to develop active use of the language in the most natural way possible. This is complemented by the use of taped lessons in the Language Laboratory. There are frequent short quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination. At the end of the first year, the student should be able to handle brief exchanges in common social situations and to read and write simple Tagalog. For the student specializing in Philippine studies, learning Tagalog is a must. For the student specializing in language studies, a number of linguists of note have found Tagalog structure highly instructive in understanding certain aspects of language. For the student with Philippine affinities, learning Tagalog provides a bond of understanding and for some, a link to one's roots. For the student who has neither a Philippine connection nor a specialist interest in language, learning Tagalog can be rewarding as it provides an experience of new modes of expression and new ways of looking at the world around us and within ourselves. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Naylor)

201(401). Intermediate Thai. S&SEA 102 or equivalent. (3). (FL).

This course continues and extends the conversational skills begun in Thai 101-102. It also includes increasing attention to the written language, in the form of short reading and writing assignments, usually with content relating to Thai culture. The class is conducted largely in Thai. In addition to gaining proficiency at reading and writing, students on completing the two-term sequence 201-202 will have substantially mastered Thai pronunciation, and will be able to handle conversational situations with some complications. [Cost:2] [WL:4] (Solnit)

203(403). Intermediate Indonesian. S&SEA 104. (3). (FL).

The course is the first half of a two-term sequence aimed at increasing the student's proficiency in the four basic language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing in modern Indonesian. Although increasing emphasis is given to the development of reading and writing skills, listening and speaking constitute an integral part of the course which is conducted entirely in Indonesian. Vocabulary building and instruction in matters of cross-cultural sensitivity are of great import. The primary text used is keyed to a set of tapes for use in the language lab and concentrates on practical knowledge of the language. Supplementary materials introduce the student to reading modern Indonesian literature. Evaluation is based on classroom performance, homework assignments, tests, and a final exam. [Cost:3] (Florida)

205(405). Intermediate Hindi-Urdu. S&SEA 106. (4). (FL).

South and Southeast Asia 205/206 is the second year in the sequence of Hindi-Urdu courses offered by the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures. The course meets four hours a week in two sessions. It is intended to increase students' skills and proficiency in speaking, in comprehension, and in reading and writing the Devanagari (Hindi) script. Students are also introduced to the Nastaliq (Urdu) writing system at this stage. Evaluation is based on attendance, written homework assignments, quizzes, dictations, and examinations. Prerequisite: SSEA 106. Students with a background in Hindi-Urdu may also enter the sequence at this point. See the instructor for placement examination. [Cost:1] [WL:1] (Taj)

207(433). Intermediate Tagalog. S&SEA 108 or equivalent. (3). (FL).

This course is designed for the student who has some knowledge of Tagalog and who wishes to develop some fluency in spoken Tagalog and to be acquainted with Tagalog literature. It is part of a two-term sequence which is essentially a continuation of what has been learned in the first year but there will be more emphasis on reading and writing. Students who have not taken Elementary Tagalog (South and Southeast Asia 307) may take this course if they pass an evaluation test to be given by the instructor. The format will be as follows: two class hours a week will be devoted to readings and grammar review and one class hour a week will be devoted to guided conversation. Readings will be assigned and these will provide the framework for the discussion of grammatical points and question and answer sessions in Tagalog on the content. There will be written assignments, a midterm, and a final examination. By the end of the second year, students should have acquired sufficient competence to handle longer conversations, write brief letters, read certain plays, newspapers, magazines, etc. Course texts are: INTERMEDIATE READINGS IN TAGALOG, ed. by Bowen; TAGALOG REFERENCE GRAMMAR by Schacter and Octanes; and a Tagalog-English Dictionary. Supplementary readings will be assigned during the term. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Naylor)

305(505). Advanced Hindi-Urdu. S&SEA 205 and 206. (3). (FL). May be elected twice for a total of six credits.

South and Southeast Asia 305 is the fifth term in the sequence of courses offered by the Dept. of Asian Languages and Cultures in Hindi-Urdu. Meeting three times a week, the course is intended to further students' skills in speaking and aural comprehension as well as increase their proficiency in reading and writing both Hindi and Urdu. Students with prior knowledge of Hindi-Urdu may be able to join the sequence at this point. See the instructor for placement. [Cost:2] [WL:1] (Hook)

309(507). Advanced Sanskrit. S&SEA 110 or equivalent. (3). (FL).

This course begins work on advanced grammar of classical Sanskrit and also involves reading simple stories, parts of Sanskrit dramas and other similar classical literary texts. The goal of the course is to prepare the student to read non-technical classical Sanskrit. (Deshpande)

401(501). Advanced Thai. S&SEA 202 or equivalent. (3). (FL).

In this course students will move from material written specifically for foreign language-learners to "real" Thai, including such genres as newspaper articles, essays, and fiction. Class discussion of the reading selections and other topics will be in Thai, giving students the chance to acquire more sophisticated oral skills such as those of advancing and supporting opinions and interpretations. Written assignments will advance students' facility at writing Thai. [Cost:2] [WL:4] (Solnit)

403(503). Advanced Indonesian. S&SEA 204. (3). (FL).

The course is the first half of a two-term sequence aimed at the further development of the student's proficiency in the four basic language skills listening, speaking, reading and writing - in modern Indonesian. The course work is designed to improve the student's command of basic grammatical structures as well as to build advanced vocabulary. Socio-cultural orientation will increase the student's familiarity with the important socio-linguistic aspects of Indonesian language use. The course stresses active manipulation of a practical vocabulary for both formal and informal language situations. Readings further the student's exposure to modern Indonesian literature. Evaluation is based on classroom performance, homework assignments, tests and a final exam or project. [Cost:2] (Florida)

463. Advanced Readings of Modern Indonesian Texts I. S&SEA 404 or equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

The course is the first half of a two-term sequence designed to introduce the student to critical readings of modern Indonesian texts. A reading and speaking knowledge of modern Indonesian is prerequisite (equivalent to having completed the 6-term sequence in Indonesian). With an emphasis on text analysis, the student is required to produce critical commentaries on (and sometimes translations of) selected passages from a variety of assigned texts. The course is run as a seminar with discussion conducted in Indonesian. Evaluation is based on the written assignments and classroom performance. [Cost:2] (Florida)

Courses in Asian Studies (Division 323)

111/History 151. South Asian Civilization. (4). (HU).

See History 151. (Murphey)

121/History 121. Great Traditions of East Asia. (4). (HU).

See History 121. (Murphey)

230(320)/Buddhist Studies 230/Phil. 230/Rel. 230. Introduction to Buddhism. Asian Studies 220 or the equivalent. (4). (HU).

See Buddhist Studies 230.

395. Honors Seminar. Honors candidate in Asian Studies. (3). (Excl).

Honors students in Asian Studies should use this course number for their Honors thesis, but will normally work with whatever faculty member is closest to the subject of the thesis.

476/RC Hums. 476/Chinese 476. Writer and Society in Modern China. (4). (HU).

See Chinese 476.


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