ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

COURSES IN French (Division 371)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school MUST take a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction. Students who began French at another college or university also take the placement test.

101. Elementary French. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (FL).

Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. The sequence of French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar and vocabulary which students need (1) to understand the French of everyday life when spoken at moderate speed; (2) to be understood in typical situations of everyday life; and (3) to read non-technical French of moderate difficulty. French structures are taught in class through many communication exercises stressing listening and speaking. Readings on subjects dealing with French culture and civilization are introduced in French 101, with an increased amount of reading in French 102. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20 to 25 students. Homework consists of studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises and compositions, video viewing, and laboratory, structural exercises and speaking tests. There are weekly quizzes or tests as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations, and speaking tests. Students with any previous French in high school or college are NOT to enroll in sections 101-013. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102 and 103.

102. Elementary French, Continued. French 101 or equivalent. French 102 may be followed by 231. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. (4). (FL).

See French 101. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H.Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course. [Cost:1, Same texts as 101] [WL:See statement above.

103. Review of Elementary French. Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (FL).

The course objectives and methods of instruction are identical to those of French 101/102. It moves at a rapid pace, covering about 60 percent of the French 101 materials by midterm, and about 60 percent of the French 102 material by the end of the term. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Homework is similar to French 101 and 102, but its daily amount is up to 60 percent more than in either French 101 or 102 because of the rapid pace. Videos will be viewed about twice a month to complement lessons. Examinations are similar to 101/102, and the final examination is identical to that of French 102. [Cost:2] [WL:See statement above.

205. French Conversation for Non-concentrators. French 102, or 103, or equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

French 205/206 are informal mini-courses with emphasis on self-expression in conversational French. (Only French 205 is offered in Fall Term). It is for students who would like to keep up with their knowledge of the language. Class work consists of studying the essential vocabulary, reading of simple journalistic prose, and conversation based on the reading material. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 20-24 students. There are no examinations, and the grading is Credit/No Credit only, determined on the basis of attendance, homework, and participation in classroom activities. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

231. Second-Year French. French 102, or 103, or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

Students whose last French course was NOT at U of M Ann Arbor must take the placement test. The sequence French 231/232 are the third and fourth terms of language study offered. It presents a comprehensive grammar review, study of finer points of French structure, and the reading of journalistic prose, short stories, and literary excerpts. Both courses include the use of French movies and video. In addition, French 232 has outside reading: students read a book on their own, and take a reading comprehension test. The proficiency gained by the end of French 232 should enable students to express themselves in French on topics of interest, to understand conversations on such topics. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of grammar study, written exercises, and laboratory work. There are comprehensive coursewide tests as well as the midterm and final examinations. [COST:3] [WL:See statement above.

232. Second-Year French, Continued. French 231 or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

See French 231. [Cost:4] [WL:See statement above.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of these courses does not satisfy the LS&A language requirement.

111. First Special Reading Course. No prerequisite; may not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have received credit for college French. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

This course is for undergraduate and graduate students who would like to gain a good reading knowledge of French in one term. The essentials of French grammar as well as vocabulary and idioms are presented for passive recognition, followed by translation and sight-reading exercises on materials taken from both humanities and sciences. The skills gained in the course should enable students to read technical writings of moderate difficulty. Toward the end of the term students select a short article or a chapter of a book in their field of interest for outside reading. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

Other Language Courses

305. Practical French. French 232 or equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

French 305 is a minicourse for students who would like to keep up with their French in an informal atmosphere. It is organized like French 205/206, but cultural and intellectual readings provide topics of conversation. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 20-25 students. There are no examinations, and attendance, homework and active participation in classroom activities determine the credit/no credit grades. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

350. Independent Study. French 232 or the equivalent and permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT) May be elected for a total of six hours credit.

French 350 is an Independent Study course which may be offered to undergraduate students who demonstrate the need to study some specific language aspect of French, phonetics (in this case it must not correspond in any way to French 325), grammar, style, and translation included. The course may be elected for up to 6 hours of credit, but that option should be exceptional. Generally 3 credits are granted if the course work is as intensive as any regular course at the 300 level. The type of requirement for the final grade must be specifically indicated: examination or other. In all cases the student petitioning for independent student 350 and the supporting instructor must demonstrate that the course is needed and that no other regular course may be taken as a substitute. (Nelson, Mermier)

362. Advanced French. French 361 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

This course stresses the improvement of students' written and spoken French. Using a selection of literary and cultural material organized by theme as the basis of round-table discussions and written exercises, students will increase their ability to write and converse fluently as they think about the ideas that have shaped French culture and history. Material is both audio-visual and written, and includes fiction by authors such as Christiane Rochefort and Voltaire, films by directors such as Jean-Luc Godard and Jean Renoir, literary correspondence, songs, and press articles. Classroom activities and discussion topics vary with instructor. Required work in all sections include active participation in class, weekly compositions, and study of audio-visual material at the language lab. The course is designed as a bridge between the highly structured activities of language courses and the more independent work required in literature and civilization courses; grammatical difficulties will be treated as needed. Midterm and final examinations will test level of spoken and written fluency. [Cost:3] [WL:4] (Graham)

371. Writing French. French 361. (3). (Excl).

The main objective of the course is to develop the skills necessary to writing correct, fluent French. In order to achieve it we will work on three levels: (a) development and reinforcement of correct grammar through presentation of specific syntactic problems, practice exercises, and individual diagnosis of students' writing; (b) development of vocabulary (elimination of faux-amis, finding LE MOT JUSTE); (c)development of quality in composition from imitation to creation (learning how to organize an essay and how to write in tight, sparse prose). Students are expected to write frequent essays. In the second half of the term, each student will work on his/her own short story, with the help of his/her own partners. Final course grade will reflect the students' progress and participation in class This course is elected primarily but not exclusively by students concentrating in French. [Cost:2] [WL:3] (Belloni)

Literature

331. French Literature in Translation. Not open to French concentrators. (3). (HU).

This is a Collegiate Fellows literature course taught in English and open to all interested freshmen and sophomores. (See the front section of this Course Guide for a complete list of Collegiate Fellows courses.) There are no prerequisites and the course may be taken form second level ECB credit. The course will examine a number of novels and short stories from European and American literature ranging from the 18th century to the present in terms of the ways each of the (1) involves a representation of desire, (2) offers a critique and analysis of desire through language, and (3) demonstrates how desire, something we think of as personal and private, is determined by systems of cultural values expressed in language. The basic readings for the course will include: Laclos' LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES; Dostoevsky's THE ETERNAL HUSBAND; Jensen's GRADIVA; Proust's SWAN'S LOVE; West's MISS LONELYHEARTS, as well as short stories and essays by Sartre, Schnitzler, Moravia, Kundera, Smiley, Nin, Bourjaily, and Barthes. Students will be graded on the basis of class participation, written assignments and exams. (Kavanagh)

387/388/389 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE.

The objective of this series of courses is to acquaint students with significant literary works and literary theories drawn from the entire range of French literature. Each work is analyzed (in French) individually for its own merit and is then placed within the context of its period. Students are asked to read carefully the assigned works, to reflect on them, and to express their reactions and ideas in class. The instructor holds class discussions, points out the artistic values of the work, and attempts in many cases to show the evolution of literature as it reflects various external factors. Grades may be based on discussions, papers, and a midterm and/or final examination.

388. Introduction to French Literature (1800 to 1900). French 232. (3). (HU).

This course will focus on five of the most important writers of 19th century French literature, namely Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Zola and Maupassant. Emphasis will be placed on the literary aspects of the works read as well as the historical, political and artistic context of the day. A typical assignment will consist of reading some twenty pages of a given work and preparing to discuss them in class. Students will write four papers in French (three or four pages in length). Each paper will be corrected for grammar, choice of expression and content. The course grade will be based on the results of written work and on classroom participation. Regular attendance is required. There is no final examination. The course is conducted in French. [Cost:2] [WL:4] (Gray)

389. Introduction to French Literature (1900 to present). French 232. (3). (HU).

This is an invitation to explore some of the significant moments in the development of 20th century literature. We will ask ourselves such questions as: How does a new perspective on the human subject and on historical reality alter the way in which literature is written? What happened to the "traditional" genres (the lyric poem, the psychological novel, the bourgeois drama)? These issues will be discussed through a selection of works by Apollinaire, Valery, Aime Cesaire, for poetry; Colette, Sarraute, for the novel; Sartre, Genet, for the theatre. Glimpses into recent theories of literary analysis will provide a critical insight into these new forms of writing. Evaluation will be based on class participation and discussion, three short papers, and a final essay. No examinations. WL:4 (Clej)

391. Junior Honors Course. Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

This course is conducted as a tutorial for qualified juniors intending to continue with Honors work in French but not participating in a junior-year-in-France program. Subjects and approaches are selected to fit the needs of individual students.

401(432). French Literature in Translation. A knowledge of French is not required. May not be included in a concentration plan in French (or teaching minor). (3). (HU).

FRENCH FEMINOCENTRISM. This course is about relations of desire and power in the French (language) novel; it is about representations of women and the striking interest displayed by novelists male and female in the "psychology" of women; but it is also - and consequently about men too and the "sociology" of the relations between men and women. Most specifically, the hypothesis will be that realistic fiction in general and novels in particular are, somewhat like gossip, interested in women because they tend to be identified in male-dominated social formations as sources of social scandal; and that the novels are interested in scandal because what a given society or social group takes to be scandalous reveals what its norms are and how they function. Novels, in short, are about "trouble" and trouble reveals how "order" functions but if women have been thought of as synonymous with trouble in this sense, we will also look at how certain women writers have responded to this characterization by "writing back." This is mainly a reading course. Class-time will be devoted to lectures and discussion (in proportions that will be partly determined by the size of the class). There will be no midterm of final, but students will be required to keep a journal of their reading which will be regularly graded. Special writing assignments and tutorials will be provided for students who wish to take the course for ECB credit. Textbooks: La Fayette, LA PRINCESSE DE CLEVES; Laclos, LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES; Balzac, HISTORY OF THE THIRTEEN; Flaubert, MADAME BOVARY; Rachilde, THE JUGGLER; Colette, THE VAGABOND; S. Schwartz-Bart, THE BRIDGE OF BEYOND. (Chambers)

431(478). Intellectual Trends in Modern France. Two of French 386, 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

INTELLECTUAL TRENDS IN MODERN FRANCE. Plus ca change, plus ce n'est pas la meme chose: from the "events" of May '68 to the Rise of the Right Chirac to Le Pen (in France), from the anti-war demonstrations of the 60s to the Reagan years (in the U.S.), things obviously changed a great deal. But in the mechanisms directing change some elements are constant, and, to uncover them this course presupposes (a) that every major change reverberated in all of society's activities politics, philosophy, art, literature - so that a parallel evolution can be observed in each of these areas; and (b) that an understanding of the mechanism of change is useful for comprehending the succession of historical "periods" and for predicting the direction of future social and intellectual transformations. The course proposes a working theory of change and traces on that basis the history of ideas in France from 1875 to 1975. Readings, which are primarily literary, usually going from Rimbaud to Robbe-Grillet, from surrealism to deconstruction, form the basis of class discussions. The course is conducted in French; there are usually two papers of 7-10 pages each and a final examination. Cost:2 (Nelson)

450. Independent Studies. Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

The work to be done should not be the same as that offered in a regular course. A written description of the project together with an appropriate bibliography must be submitted for initial approval to the proposed instructor of the course and then to the concentration adviser for final approval prior to the beginning of the term during which the independent study is to be undertaken. (Gray)

451(437)/MARC 437. French Culture in Literature in the Middle Ages with Visual Assistance. Taught in French. Two of French 386, 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

FRENCH CULTURE IN LITERATURE IN THE MIDDLE AGES WITH VISUAL ASSISTANCE> The purpose of the course is to give students a general overview of the culture of the Middle Ages as reflected in the literature of the time. Slides will be used to present the general background of the French Middle Ages. Fall 1991 course is to be team taught. Professor Mermier will start the course in September and will teach through October 10. Then Professor Glyn Burgess, a internationally known Medieval scholar, will teach until mid November. Then Professor Mermier will return and close the course. The course will be taught in English, thus accommodating not only French concentrators, but MARC and other students of the College. Professor Mermeir will prepare a course pack and the SONG OF ROLAND (in English translation Penguin edition) will be ordered. Professor Burgess will cover the SONG OF ROLAND'S literary value. (Professor Mermier will have given an introduction to the text). Professor Burgess will also bring some additional texts which will be photocopied and distributed in class. Upon returning in November, Professor Mermier will present samples of literary texts illustrating the evolution of society and the modification of culture after the SONG OF ROLAND, up to the end of the Fifteenth century. There will be no final examination, but one term paper on the SONG OF ROLAND for Professor Burgess, and one final paper for Professor Mermeir. The final grade will be the average of both grades. Attention, of course, will be given to attendance, participation and quality of oral exposes. Although the knowledge of Old French is not required, students are urged to read the Old French texts in the original in addition to the translation. (Mermeir)

453(487/488). Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Two of French 386, 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

The history of dramatic literature numbers four great creative periods: the fifth century B.C. in Greece, the Elizabethan age in England, the Golden Age in Spain, and the 17th century in France. This had the particular distinction of establishing in both tragedy and comedy a tradition which was to determine the subsequent development of European drama. This course will focus on the works of the three most important and seminal dramatists of the time, the tragedies of Corneille and Racine and the comedies of Molière, first of all as literary texts, but also in relation to the social and political context of 17th century France. Grades will be based on class room participation (regular attendance is required), and on three papers (5-8 pages each) on assigned topics. The course will be conducted in French. (Gray)

460(442). Topics and Themes in French Literature. Two of French 386, 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures has been authorized to hire an assistant/associate professor to start in the fall term of 1991. This course has been set aside for such a new professor to teach. As a result, no course description is available at this time. Please check with the Departmental office (4108 MLB; 764-5344) for an updated description specifying the subject of the course. Prerequisite: Two of French 386, 387, 388 or 389, or the equivalent. May be repeated for credit.

Courses in Italian (Division 399)

Elementary Language Courses

101. Elementary Italian. (4). (FL).

This course has as its primary objective the acquisition of a fundamental understanding of basic Italian grammar with parallel emphasis on conversation. Text, workbook and lab manual required; Italian 101 covers the first half of the text Course topics include (1) fundamental sentence structure, (2) verb conjugations, (3) adjectives, adverbs, and sentence agreement, and (4) nouns, pronouns, and conjunctive pronouns and their position. Methods of instruction include (1) grammar drill, (2) conversation exercises, (3) translation both oral and written, and (4) weekly quizzes. Grading is based on quizzes, class participation, midterm, and a final examination. Cost:2] [WL:4]

102. Elementary Italian. Italian 101 or equivalent. (4). (FL).

This course continues the presentation of the essentials of the Italian language and attempts to broaden the student's knowledge of Italian life and culture. Conversation in the language is also emphasized. The course covers the second half of the text with workbook and lab manual; readings supplements this set of texts. Course topics include a continuation of Italian grammar; use of idiomatic expression; the culture, geography, and everyday life of Italy; and conversation topics that encourage discussion. A variety of instructional methods are used: grammar presentation and exercises, readings in Italian (dialogues, short articles, Italian newspapers, and magazines), original writing and oral discussion. Grading is based on class participation, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination. [Cost:1] [WL:4]

205. Italian Conversation for Non-concentrators. Italian 102 or equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Italian 205 emphasizes fluency and self-expression in conversational Italian. This course is for students who have had at least two (2) terms of Italian and are interested in acquiring a certain facility with the spoken language. Class work consists of reading materials from various sources (magazines, newspapers, short stories, etc.) which will be discussed in class. Use of the language laboratory will provide additional conversational material on various aspects of Italian life. Class will meet twice a week. There are no examinations, and the grading is on a credit basis only. Success in the course is determined on the basis of attendance, homework and participation in classroom activities. (Habekovic)

231. Second-Year Italian. Italian 102 or equivalent; or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

This course reviews grammar, introduces students to standard modern Italian through the reading of short stories, plays and poetry, and increases student facility in writing and speaking Italian. Compositions are required and are based upon reading or other topics of interest. Class discussions and oral reports center on readings or current events. Grading is based on class participation, compositions, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

232. Second-Year Italian, Continued. Italian 231 or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112. (4). (FL).

This course aims at a further development of each student's reading and speaking knowledge of Italian, including increased facility in both conversation and oral comprehension. There is a continuing review of grammar, and the elements of composition. Various genres of literature are read and discussed, and occasional short papers are required on these or other related topics. Oral reports on various topics are also required. Grading is based on short papers, class participation, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination. [Cost:1] [WL:4]

Other Language and Literature Courses

359. Italian Culture and History to the Eighteenth Century. (3). (HU).

The course, which will be taught in English, aims (1) to familiarize students with the major texts of the Italian Medieval and Renaissance worlds; (2) to introduce students to the historical and cultural changes of the period; and (3) to understand the shift from Medieval to Renaissance culture. Texts to be read include: selections from Vittoria Colonna, Gaspara Stampa, Castigione, and Tasso, St. Francis, Provençal poetry, Sicilian poetry, Sweet New Style, Dante's VITA NUOVA and INFERNO, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Ficino, Alberti, Pico della Mirandola, Michelangelo. While not essential, a working knowledge of Italian is useful. [Cost:3] [WL:4] (Frisch)

361. Intermediate Italian. Italian 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

All the basic skills of the language will receive attention in this course, the primary goal of which is the improvement and refinement of oral, reading and writing proficiency. Review of difficult points of grammar will be taken up when necessary, but the major concentration will be on class discussion of short reading materials ranging from newspaper and magazine articles, short fiction and poetry to polemic essays on contemporary cultural, political and social topics. Short essays will be part of the regular assignments, as will occasional prepared oral presentations, translations, and dictations. The variety of the materials covered will be as broad as possible to introduce students to the several different writing styles and manner of presentation of the language. The course will be conducted in Italian and will meet three hours weekly. [Cost:1] [WL:4]

374. Topics in Italian Literature. Italian 232. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures has been authorized to hire an assistant professor to start in the fall term of 1991. This course has been set aside for such a new professor to teach. As a result, no course description is available at this time. Please check with the Department office (4108 MLB; 764-5344) for an updated description specifying the subject of the course. Prerequisite: Italian 232. May be repeated for credit.

412. Politics, Poverty and Poetry. One literature course (in any field); knowledge of Italian is not required. (1). (HU).

From science fiction with a temporal twist to the updated conte philosphique, from harshly realistic stories of Italian partisan activities during the Second World War to dizzying fantasy of a memorable albeit unrecognizable historical past, from fictional treatment of pollution, building speculation, and election corruption to lyric dissection of the senses, Calvino is one of the most elegantly inventive story-tellers and lucid critics of the twentieth century. Broadly European in attitude and outlook, his poetics derive from the need to speak out as an ultra-modern who is nevertheless aware of the historical imperatives in question as traditional cultures change and transmute. A chronologically arranged study of selected narrative and short lectures, class discussion, short papers, individual projects and an exam. Prerequisite: One literature course (in any field); a knowledge of Italian is not required. WL:4 (Olken)

468. Studies in Modern Italian Literature. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Continuing regional identity in Italy is a viable force in any explanation of literary as well as socio-economic realities of the twentieth century. Late national unification, geographical isolation of the several regions until the mid 1900's, was followed by an explosive neo-humanism and dramatic economic upswing in the second half of the century. The regional passion and pride, and the ambivalence, of writers seeking to express their commitment both to their roots and to broader ethic, resulted in a literature expressive of both traditional loyalties and resentment, aspirations and rebellion. These phenomena are dramatically underscored in the racconti of the major writers of the century, which will be the focus of this course. Readings will include stories by Pirandello, Tozzi, Alvaro, Pratolini, Pavese, Marotta, Calvino, Moravia, Sciascia, Mastronardi, and others, approached chronologically from the beginning of the century through the 1980's. Class discussion accompanied by lectures, short papers, individual projects and exams. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. WL:4 (Olken)

472. Italian Theatre from Alfieri to Pirandello. Italian 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

This course will treat the dramas of one of Italy's greatest modern playwrights, Luigi Pirandello. While we will consider Pirandello's major theater in some detail, we will also review his narratives and his essays in order to understand the social and intellectual background of fascist Italy. In addition, various contemporary dramatists will be discussed. Requirements for the course are the following: two essays (5-8 pp. each); a class presentation; and a final exam. Readings and discussion will be either in English or Italian depending on the composition of the class. Prerequisite: Italian 232 or equivalent. Cost:1 WL:1 (Lucente)

489. Verism and Naturalism. Italian 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

The major Italian literary movement of the late nineteenth century in Italy was represented by Giovanni Verga, whose naturalism infused his short stories and novels, and established a new basis for the aesthetic directions of Italian narrative fiction, after the domination of Romanticism in the first half of the century. Il narrare breve and il narrare lungo, terms used to describe mush twentieth-century fiction, derive from Verga's works, and will be used as a formal basis form which to discuss his two novels and several short stories. Other naturalist writers will be included in discussion: Luigi Capuana and Federico de Roberto, as well as a representative group, including Gabriele D'Annunzio and Matilde Serao, who manifest Verga's influence in certain aspects of their writing. Prerequisite: Italian 232 or equivalent. WL:4 (Olken)

Courses in Portuguese (Division 452)

101. Elementary Portuguese. (4). (FL).

This course is designed to give students the ability to understand the Portuguese of everyday life when spoken at a moderate speed, to be understood in typical situations of everyday life, and to read non-technical Portuguese of moderate difficulty. The course covers units 1-10 of MODERN PORTUGUESE by Ellison et al. Because of the nature of the text and accompanying tapes, and the nationality and training of the present staff, students will learn the variety of Portuguese spoken in Brazil by educated speakers. Classroom work involves gradual introduction of Portuguese structure through dialogues and communication exercises which stress listening and speaking. Homework consists of studying grammar, memorizing structures and verb forms, writing exercises and time in the lab. Grading will be based on three hourly quizzes, oral exercises, homework, class participation and a final exam. Portuguese 101 is offered only in the Fall Term. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

231. Second-Year Portuguese. Portuguese 102 or equivalent. (4). (FL).

Second year Portuguese is designed to develop and enhance the work done in Portuguese 101/102. (See description above). It aims at perfecting writing and speaking skills, and giving students a deeper understanding of the literature, history, and culture of the Portuguese-speaking world. The required texts at the moment are King and Suner, PASA A FRINTE! and selected short stories and other materials made available as hand-outs. Classroom work involves an intensive grammar review, the study of finer points of Portuguese grammar as made necessary from daily observation of students' writing and speaking performances, oral presentations and discussion of short stories and texts from newspapers and magazines. Homework involves studying grammar, preparing oral presentations, and writing guided essays. Grading is based on quizzes given every other week, oral presentations, essays, class participation and a final exam. Portuguese 231 is only offered Fall Term. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

Courses in Romance Linguistics (Division 460)

300. Introduction to the Romance Languages. French, Spanish, or Italian: five terms at college level or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

The purposes of this course are to discuss the relationships which exist among the various Romance languages, and to acquaint students with the methods and objectives of Romance linguistics. Following a brief introduction to the methodology of linguistic analysis, the grammatical structures of French, Spanish, Italian, and Rumanian are compared. The course is conducted in English, and all required reading is in English. Students who can read other languages are encouraged to pursue certain topics in these languages. The text is a course pack supplemented by handouts. In recent years, students have come to the course with knowledge of several Romance languages and of general linguistics. This adds to the interest of the course, but should not discourage the student who knows only French or Spanish. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Leonard)

413(455)/Spanish 413/Educ. D455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics. Permission of concentration adviser. (3). (Excl).

See Spanish 413.

Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school are given a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction. Students who began Spanish at another college or university must also take the placement test.

101. Elementary Spanish. (4). (FL).

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish, this course provides a basic introduction to Spanish grammar and vocabulary, with emphasis placed on developing functional, communicative language skills. Extensive practice in listening, speaking and writing Spanish. Grade based on three departmental exams, quizzes, written work and daily oral work. (Spanish 101 AND 102 are the equivalent of Spanish 103.) [Cost:2] [WL:4]

102. Elementary Spanish, Continued. Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. (4). (FL).

A continuation of Spanish 101; composition and reading skills given more practice. Grade based on three departmental exams, three oral exams, other examinations, quizzes, written assignments (including several compositions) and daily oral work. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. Cost: Same texts as 101. WL:4

CSP section available. See the Comprehensive Studies Program (CSP) section in this GUIDE.

103. Review of Elementary Spanish. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (FL).

A refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. It prepares students for Spanish 231. Transfer students should elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

231. Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 102, or 103, or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills of students; to review the fundamentals of Spanish grammar; to build vocabulary; and to provide some insight into the literature, history and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade based on a series of quizzes and exams designed to assess ability to read, write and understand Spanish plus periodic written work (including compositions), and oral class participation.

232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued. Spanish 231 or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (FL).

This course is designed to develop fluency in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Spanish and to provide a deeper understanding of the literature, culture, outlooks, and habits of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade is based on four exams, designed to assess ability to read, write and understand Spanish, plus periodic written work (including compositions), and oral class participation. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language.

Other Language Courses

358. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators. Spanish 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 358 is a text based conversation course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary and listening skills. Class format includes open and group discussions, debates, oral presentations and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as newspaper articles, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade. (Pollard)

361. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 232 or equivalent. (3; 2-4 in the half-term). (Excl).

Spanish 362 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through the reading of journalistic prose. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare translations and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings on contemporary Hispanic life and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are taught in Spanish. The final grade is based on weekly translations, tests, and class participation. Cost:1 WL:4 (Pollard)

362. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 362 is intended to improve students' skill in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in class discussions or presentations. Prerequisite: Spanish 232 or equivalent. Cost:3 WL:1 (Pollard)

411(453). Advanced Syntax. Spanish 361 and 362. (3). (Excl).

Advance analysis of various aspects of Spanish syntax: word order, morpheme order, sentence formation rules; some morphology; some dialectology; some history of the language. Research project, midterm and final exams are required. Prerequisite: Spanish 361 and 362. WL:4 (Wolfe)

413(455)/Rom. Ling. 413/Educ. D455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics. Permission of concentration adviser. (3). (Excl).

Analysis of basic learning problems such as ser/estar, gustar, por/para, pronoun system, tense system, preterite/ imperfect, subjunctive/indicative, etc. Analysis of teaching methodologies with demonstrations and training. Critical analysis of textbooks, dictionaries and other teaching/learning materials. Research project, midterm and final exams required. Prerequisite: Permission of Concentration Advisor. WL:4 (Wolfe)

Literature

331. Spanish and Latin American Literature in Translation. Open to students at all levels. A knowledge of Spanish is not required. May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish (or teaching certificate major or minor). (3). (HU).

In this course on Spanish literature in translation, we shall be focusing on several masterpieces of the Spanish theatre. We shall read plays dating from the Spanish "Golden Age" (c. 1520-1650) and from the twentieth century. Authors include Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina and Pedro Calderon (contemporaries of Shakespeare, Corneille and Racine), and the twentieth-century Ramon del Valle- Inclan and Federico Garcia Lorca. Plays will be studied both as literary texts and as the raw material for enactment in performance. Background material will be provided as necessary to an understanding of the worlds in which these Spanish authors wrote. Presentation will take the form of part lecture, part class discussion. Particular scences will, from time to time, be singled out for closes analysis. Evaluation will be by attendance, class participation and several short to medium length papers. Spanish drama is not well known outside the field, but offers a rich tradition of plays and playwrights. This class is intended specifically for non-majors: all texts, readings, lectures, discussion, papers etc. will be in English. The course could be of special interest to students majoring in another literature, or specializing in theatre of drama, as well as those who wish to increase their familiarity with Spanish literature and culture but without becoming Spanish majors. (Anderson)

350. Independent Studies. Permission of concentration adviser. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once with permission.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Adviser no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course. (Hafter)

371. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU).

Students in this course will have the opportunity to deepen their knowledge of the past through the study of Spanish Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque literature. The course, conducted in Spanish, will focus on the main literary genres of the literature of Spain from its origin until the Baroque era. Reading materials will include lyric and narrative (Romancero) poetry, two prose works (Lazarillo de Tormes and one of Cervantes' Novelas Ejemplares), and samples of medieval and Renaissance drama. The final reading list will be posted on the professor's door by the end of April. Throughout the course students will be required to do several textual exercises and one research paper under the guidance of the professor, as well as to take a midterm and final exam. Prerequisite: Spanish 232 or equivalent. WL:4 (Lopez-Grigera)

373. Topics in Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

We will read a representative sampling of Spanish women writers, starting chronologically with Florencia Pinar and ending with writers of the 1970's and 80's. A course pack of readings will include: selected poetry by Florencia Pinar, Santa Teresa de Jesus, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Carolina Coronado, Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda, Rosaila de Castro, Gloria Fuertes, Julia Uceda, etc.; and stories by Maria de Zayas y Sotomayor, Emilia Pardo Bazan, ANa Maria Matute, Ana Maria Moix, Carmen Riera, Carmen Martin Gaite, and Adelaida Garcia Morales. There will be a midterm; final exam; and term paper. In Spanish. (Valis)

381. Introduction to Latin American Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU).

Covers the main Spanish American literary periods, from Rocco, Neoclassicism, Romanticism to Naturalism; poetry narrative, essay and theatre; and the main authors (Andres Belloi, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, Esteban Echeverriria, Jose Hernandez, Ricardo Palma, Jose Martii, Ruben Carrio, Gabriela Mistral, Jose Enrique Rodo, Alfonso Reyes, Manuel Ascencio Sergura, Gregorio Laferrere, Florencio Sanchez). The concentration is on reading a selection of literary texts. First course in the sequence 381-382-463. Conducted in Spanish. Lecture and discussion will be the format of the course. The student's performance will be evaluated through grades obtained in a)reports, b)midterm exam, c)?? Prerequisite: Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Cost:1 WL:4 (Goic)

382. Introduction to Latin American Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU).

We will read narrative poetry, theater and essays by writers that include Jose Marti, Ruben Davio, Gabriela Mistral, Mariano Azuela, Cesar Vallejo, Pablo Neruda, Rosario Castellanos, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Clarice Lispector and others. In Spanish. Requirements: Mid-term, final and an in-class presentation. Prerequisite: Spanish 232 or equivalent. WL:4 (Perez)

391. Junior Honors Course. Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

In Spanish 391, selected readings chosen from Spain and Spanish America are studied and analyzed through class work, conferences with a senior member of the faculty, written reports, and term papers. This course exists to enable students who have been admitted to the Honors Program to begin research supervised by a faculty sponsor. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Honors Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Honors Committee. The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course. (Goic)

435(450). Independent Study. Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 3 credits.

See Spanish 350.

468(469). Spanish Theater of the Twentieth Century. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388. (3). (Excl).

This upper level course seeks to introduce students in some detail to the work of some of Spain's foremost twentieth-century playwrights, such as Ramon del Valle-Inclan, Fedrico Garcia Lorca and Rafael Alberti. Several plays by each of the authors selected are studied in some depth. Students who have some knowledge of Spanish drama of other epochs (e.g., the Golden Age comedia) and/or of turn-of-the-century European drama (especially Symbolism) may have some small advantage, but the course is designed essentially to take students with no previous acquaintance through to a high level of familiarity by the end of the term. To this end the opening hours are devoted to establishing a historical, cultural and literary context in which the individual works may then be appreciated: contemporary European movements will be briefly considered as well as the general situation of the Spanish stage just before and during the period of activity of the chosen playwrights. However, the fundamental philosophy of the course is that there is no substitute for the close reading of individual texts, and the bulk of the term will be devoted to working through some seven or eight plays. They will be approached both as pieces of literature and as the bare bones of dramatic productions. Teaching is by a mixture of lecture, class discussion and some informal oral presentations. Evaluation is by attendance, class participation, and several medium-length papers. (Anderson)

475(488). Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.

SECTION 001: CONTEMPORARY LATINA AND LATIN AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS. We will read Rosario Castellanos, Clarice Lispector, Maria Luisa Bombal, Cristina Peri Rossi, Sylvia Molloy, Rosario Ferre, Lusia Valensuela, Elena Poniatowska, Gloria Anazaldua, Cherrie Moraga, Sandra Cisneros and others, as well as famininst, U.S. minority and Third World critical perspectives. In Spanish and English. Requirements: Mid-term, final and an in-class presentation. Prerequisite: Spanish 361 and three chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. May be elected for total of nine credits. WL:4 (Perez)

491. Senior Honors Course. Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Students who successfully complete the Junior year Honors sequence are eligible to elect the senior year sequence (Spanish 490 and 491). In Spanish 491 the focus is upon selected topics, authors, literary movements, or genres chosen from Spain or Spanish America depending on the needs of the student. The student will study and analyze the subject supervised by a senior member of the faculty. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Honors Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Honors Committee. The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course. (Goic)


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