ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

Courses in French (Division 371)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school must take a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction. Students who began French at another college or university also take the placement test.

101. Elementary French. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. The sequence of French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture which are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials. Classes meet four hours per week in sections of 20-25 students. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as midterm and final examinations and speaking tests. Class participation is graded. Students with any prior study of French should NOT enroll in these sections. (Sections: 10-13 are reserved for students who have never studied French) Cost:3

102. Elementary French, Continued. French 101 or equivalent. French 102 may be followed by 231. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. (4). (LR).

See French 101. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H.Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course. [Cost:1, Same texts as 101] [WL:See statement above.

103. Review of Elementary French. Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

The objectives and methods of instruction are identical to those of French 101/102. The course moves at a rapid pace, most of the material presented in French 101/102. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Homework is similar to French 101 and 102, although daily amount is up to 60 percent more than either French 101 or 102 because of the rapid pace. Several videos will be viewed to complement lessons. Examinations are similar to 101/102, and the final examination is identical to that of French 102.

205. French Conversation for Non-concentrators. French 102, or 103, or equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

French 205/206 are informal mini-courses with emphasis on self-expression in conversational French. (Only French 205 is offered in Fall Term). It is for students who would like to keep up with their knowledge of the language. Class work consists of studying the essential vocabulary, reading of simple journalistic prose, and conversation based on the reading material. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 20-24 students. There are no examinations, and the grading is Credit/No Credit only, determined on the basis of attendance, homework, and participation in classroom activities. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

231. Second-Year French. French 102, or 103, or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Students whose last French course was NOT at U of M Ann Arbor must take the placement test. The sequence French 231/232 are the third and fourth terms of language study offered. It presents a comprehensive grammar review, study of finer points of French structure, and the reading of journalistic prose, short stories, and literary excerpts. Both courses include the use of French movies and video. The proficiency gained by the end of French 232 should enable students to express themselves in French on topics of interest, to understand conversations on such topics. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of grammar study, written exercises, and laboratory work both audio and video. There are comprehensive coursewide tests as well as the midterm and final examinations. [COST:3] [WL:See statement above.

232. Second-Year French, Continued. French 231 or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

In French 232, students will continue learning and reviewing vocabulary and grammar from the second half of the book Ensuite. There will be short weekly readings (advertisements, literary, excerpts, and short stories) and by the middle of the semester, students will begin reading a full-length French novel!! (They will read the majority of the novel on their own and take a reading comprehension test at the end of the semester). Throughout the semester, students will listen to French songs, see several videos (from French television) as well as two French movies. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. In addition to the outside reading test, there will be 3 course wide tests, a midterm, and a final examination.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of these courses does not satisfy the LS&A language requirement.

111. First Special Reading Course. No prerequisite; may not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have received credit for college French. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

This course is for undergraduate and graduate students who would like to gain a good reading knowledge of French in one term. The essentials of French grammar as well as vocabulary and idioms are presented for passive recognition, followed by translation and sight-reading exercises on materials taken from both humanities and sciences. The skills gained in the course should enable students to read technical writings of moderate difficulty. Toward the end of the term students select a short article or a chapter of a book in their field of interest for outside reading. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

Other Language Courses

305. Practical French. French 232 or equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

French 305 is a mini-course for students who would like to keep up with their French in an informal atmosphere. It is organized like French 205/206, but cultural and intellectual readings provide topics of conversation. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 20-25 students. There are no examinations, and attendance, homework and active participation in classroom activities determine the credit/no credit grades.

361. Intermediate French. French 232 or equivalent. (3; 2-4 in half-term). (Excl).

The purpose of this course is to help students improve their proficiency in the spoken language and in their writing skills through varied activities. French grammar is reviewed; however, this is not a grammar class. The reading excerpts are taken from contemporary works by authors from different French-speaking countries. In the second half of the term, students will read and work on a full-length novel and watch and work on a movie. Videos from recent French news programs will be used for discussion once a week or so. ACTIVE PARTICIPATION is expected of all students and is part of the final grade. All classes are taught in French. Bi-monthly essays, two in-class exams, and one final examination. (Belloni)

362. Advanced French. French 361 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

French 362 is neither a literature nor a grammar class. It is designed as a bridge between the highly structured activities of language courses and the more independent work required in literature and civilization courses. French 362 has two main objectives: 1) to help students improve their written and oral fluency; 2) to familiarize students with the linguistic and analytic tools necessary to approach a document, whether a literary text, a newspaper article, or a video document. Used as the basis of round-table discussions and written exercises, these documents will help students increase their ability to write and converse fluently on different themes presented in class. Active classroom participation is essential, and is part of the final grade. All classes are taught in French. Bi-monthly essays, 2 in-class exams, one final examination. WL:4 (Belloni)

371. Writing French. French 361. (3). (Excl).

The main objective of the course is to develop the skills necessary to writing correct, fluent French. In order to achieve it we will work on three levels: (a) development and reinforcement of correct grammar through presentation of specific syntactic problems, practice exercises, and individual diagnosis of students' writing; (b) development of vocabulary (elimination of faux-amis, finding LE MOT JUSTE); (c) development of quality in composition from imitation to creation (learning how to organize an essay and how to write in tight, sparse prose). Students are expected to write frequent essays. In the second half of the term, each student will work on his/her own short story, with the help of his/her own partners. Final course grade will reflect the students' progress and participation in class. This course is elected primarily but not exclusively by students concentrating in French. [Cost:2] [WL:3] (Belloni)

380. Intermediate Business French. French 361 and 362. Students may be permitted to take 380 and 362 concurrently. (3). (Excl).

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the LANGUAGE of business transactions in France. It deals with both written and spoken commercial French. It is partly built around a fictitious company whose activities are divided into themes dealing with various aspects of the business world: banking, advertising, claims and disputes regarding products, organization and hierarchy of the enterprise, applying for a job in France. The writing will concentrate on commercial correspondence and will stress the formal nature of written business French. Attendance mandatory. NO AUDITORS. Maximum enrollment is 20. (Gabrielli)

426/Rom. Ling. 453. French Phonology and Morphology. French 361 or 362 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

This course will introduce you to the basics of French phonology and phonetics and offer you a review of French pronunciation and vocabulary. We first compare written and spoken French in order to analyze the numerous gaps between the two, which cause learning problems for many speakers of American English. We then study prosodic features such as stress, syllabic structure, and intonation, and proceed to compare French and English vowels and consonants to see how they are organized into their respective phonological systems. We will also examine briefly some of the salient features of very colloquial French and of a few dialects (e.g., French spoken in the south of France and Canada). Under morphology, we will study the evolution of the French language in terms of sound changes that help explain the seeming "irregularities" of Modern French as well as derivation of words. The course will be conducted in French, and the classroom work will consist of lectures, discussions and TRAVAUX PRATIQUES, which emphasize practical work with the language. Your course grade will be based on two in-class one-hour examinations and the TRAVAUX PRATIQUE, some of which must be submitted. [Cost:2] [WL:4] (Hagiwara)

Civilization

384. Origins of Contemporary France: From the Gauls to de Gaulle. French 361. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

The course follows two simultaneous directions: we will study the representation of conflict as a moment of crisis in French and Francophone cultural productions and we will also explore the idea according to which "French" culture is itself the result of conflictual forces. A first series of question could be: How does a culture represent anger, struggles, wars, and conflicts? How is the "hero" depicted and celebrated, how is a "victory" commemorated? A second set of questions would be: Who has power over the way in which the "hero" is represented? Why are some conflicts remembered and others vilified? Does literary canon reflect this rivalry? We will be looking at texts differently recognized by the canon and representing different types of conflict (war, love, incest, religion...) Mitsou (Colette), La Sagouine (Maillet), Phedre (Racine), Gilles et Jeanne (Tournier), Tartuffe (Molière), "Lanval" (Marie de France). WL:4 (Rosello)

Literature

387/388/389 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE. The objective of this series of courses is to acquaint students with significant literary works and literary theories drawn from the entire range of French literature. Each work is analyzed (in French) individually for its own merit and is then placed within the context of its period. Students are asked to read carefully the assigned works, to reflect on them, and to express their reactions and ideas in class. The instructor holds class discussions, points out the artistic values of the work, and attempts in many cases to show the evolution of literature as it reflects various external factors. Grades may be based on on discussions, papers, and a midterm and/or final examination.

387. Introduction to French Literature (1600 to 1800). French 232. (3). (HU).

We shall read two plays by Corneille, two plays by Racine, and one comedy by Molière (the latter coming first, followed by Racine and then by Corneille, this sequence being dictated by the desire to tackle easier texts first). The Enlightenment will be represented by Montesquieu's Lettres persanes and Voltaire's Candide. We will situate these texts in the philosophical, political and historical contexts which help understand them. Specifically, we shall see how Seventeenth century theatre reflects (or translates? perhaps questions?) the values of a society oriented toward the acquisition of wealth and the desire to see the power of the state take the form of "absolute monarchy," whereas the two texts of the Eighteenth Century will be seen in the light of Locke's empiricism and of the critique of institutions which will lead to the French Revolution. Two films Louis the XIVth Rise to Power and the U-M performance of L'Avare) will be used as a complement to the lectures and class discussion. Recent experience having taught me that students are poorly equipped when it comes to reading texts in French, let alone when it comes to self-expression, I will devote some time to problems of vocabulary and grammar. Please note that all students will be expected to write their papers in French. There will be three papers (two short ones: 3-4 pages, plus the term paper of 6-8 pages) a mid-term and a final examination. You should feel free to contact me for any questions: 662-6650. WL:4 (Muller)

388. Introduction to French Literature (1800 to 1900). French 232. (3). (HU).
Section 002.
This course will focus on five of the most important writers of 19th century French literature, namely Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Zola and Maupassant. Emphasis will be placed on the literary aspects of the works read as well as the historical, political and artistic context of the day. A typical assignment will consist of reading some twenty pages of a given work and preparing to discuss them in class. Students will write four papers in French (three or four pages in length). Each paper will be corrected for grammar, choice of expression and content. The course grade will be based on the results of written work and on classroom participation. Regular attendance is required. There is no final examination. The course is conducted in French. [Cost:2] [WL:4] (Gray)

389. Introduction to French Literature (1900 to present). French 232. (3). (HU).
Section 001.
This course explores some significant moments in the development of 20th century French literature. These great "moments" will be discussed through a selection of authors, genres and works chosen among the following: Poetry: Paul Valery, Guillaume Apollinaire, Saint-John Perse, Paul Eluard, Jacques Prevert. Theatre: Paul Claudel, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Anouilh, Eugene Ionesco. Novel: Andre Gide, Marcel Proust, Colette, Antoine de Saint-Exupery, Nathalie Sarraute, Albert Camus. Course work includes oral exposes in class and assigned papers. Students are expected to thoroughly read and study the texts assigned. They will be responsible for knowing the contents of the texts, and should be able to discuss their structure and meaning. Evaluation will be based on regular preparation, class participation, oral exposes, and assigned papers. No examination. (Mermier)

Section 002. Literature reflects both the changing attitudes of society and the special insights of individual authors. Freedom and constraint, love and death, fear, alienation, moral values, and the notion of self-concept: the evolution of these fundamental concerns of twentieth-century society as understood by major French authors is the primary focus of the course. Students will also be encouraged to think about the nature of literary expression itself, its functions and its forms. Class discussions in French will analyze the special insights and literary techniques of five or six authors such as Gide, Colette, Proust, Valery, Sartre, Camus, Robbe-Grillet, Sarraute, and Duras. Three or four short papers and a final examination. WL:4 (Nelson)

450. Independent Studies. Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

The work to be done should not be the same as that offered in a regular course. A written description of the project together with an appropriate bibliography must be submitted for initial approval to the proposed instructor of the course and then to the concentration adviser for final approval prior to the beginning of the term during which the independent study is to be undertaken.

457. Introduction to Twentieth-Century French Literature. Two of French 386, 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).
Section 001.
Le cours porte essentiellement sur la generation née vers 1870, et dont les annees de maturite se situent donc le premier tiers du vingtieme siecle. Les ecrivains choisis pour representer cette generation sont: Marcel Proust, Andre Gide, Colette et Paul Valery. Afin de situer ces ecrivains qui (a l'exception de Coletter sans doute peuvent etre definis comme heritiers du symbolisme et par consequent foncierement hostiles aux preceptes du naturalisme, nous lirons d-abord de longs extraits de Nana, a la lumiere desquels nous pourrons rappeler ce que Zola a represente entre 1880 et 1890. Nous etudierons aussi l'oeuvre poetique de Guillaume Apollinaire (1881-1918), plus jeune seulement de dix annees, mais dont l'esthetique marque une nette rupture avec les valeurs du dix-neuvieme siecle. Les devoirs (au nombre de trois) seront rediges an francais par les etudiants qui se specialisent dans cette langue. WL:4 (Muller)

460. Topics and Themes in French Literature. Two of French 386, 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001: The Medieval Storyteller.
An introduction to the craft of the medieval storyteller, studied in the body of stories, myths and legends circulated in 12th and 13th century France. We will be concerned both with the perennial themes of tales (sexuality, religion, death, transgression) and with how each telling of a tale reveals a specific cultural and historical moment. We will read a collection of medieval French short fiction, in modern translation, including LAIS, FABLIAUX, exemplary stories, and selections from Marguerite de Navarre's HEPTAMERON. There will also be some reserve reading (historical and psychological background). Required work: active participation in class discussions, mid-term exam, two 5-page analyses of single stories, and a 10-page final paper and oral presentation. This course can be used to satisfy the Junior-Senior writing requirement. Cost:2 WL:4 (Graham)

Section 002: Paris and the Parisians. This course combines a study of the transformation of Parisian society in the nineteenth century with a study of a selection of literary texts and paintings representing and commenting on that transformation. The principal issues raised by the course include the demographic and class structure of the nineteenth-century Paris; crime and prostitution; the revolutions of 1830 and 1848 and the Paris Commune of 1871; cafes, restaurants and bals publics in nineteenth-century Parisian life; the transformation of Paris under the Second Empire ("Haussmannisation"); the grands magasins; fashion and dress in nineteenth-century Paris; the position of women in Parisian society; the idea of modernite; the Parisian art-world and the image of Paris in Impressionist painting.

470. African/Caribbean Literature in French. A literature course in French, and a knowledge of French. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

This course will aim to acquaint students with, and to pin-point the impact of French language and culture on the French speaking world in general and, particularly, on its literature. We will concern ourselves with the kind of literature produced in this context by studying authors from divers geographic regions in Africa and the Caribbean comparatively. The specific issues we will carry along with us will be all inspired by the notion of la difference. Among them are: 1. the interdependence of French and non-French cultures and their impact on the specificity of such a literature; 2. the construction of race and gender in the context of such a cultural mutuality. Students will be expected to make an in-class presentation, to write a short paper and a research paper. Authors will include Rene Maran, Hamidou Kane, Ahmadou Kourouma, Yambo Oualoguem, Seydou Badian, Mariama Ba, Sembene Ousmane and Sow-Fall Aminata. Cost:3 WL:1 (Some)

Courses in Italian (Division 399)

Elementary Language Courses

101. Elementary Italian. (4). (LR).

This course has as its primary objective the acquisition of a fundamental understanding of basic Italian grammar with parallel emphasis on conversation. Text, workbook and lab manual required; Italian 101 covers the first half of the text. Course topics include (1) fundamental sentence structure, (2) verb conjugations, (3) adjectives, adverbs, and sentence agreement, and (4) nouns, pronouns, and conjunctive pronouns and their position. Methods of instruction include (1) grammar drill, (2) conversation exercises, (3) translation both oral and written, and (4) weekly quizzes. Grading is based on quizzes, class participation, midterm, and a final examination. Cost:2] [WL:4]

102. Elementary Italian. Italian 101 or equivalent. (4). (LR).

This course continues the presentation of the essentials of the Italian language and attempts to broaden the student's knowledge of Italian life and culture. Conversation in the language is also emphasized. The course covers the second half of the text with workbook and lab manual; readings supplements this set of texts. Course topics include a continuation of Italian grammar; use of idiomatic expression; the culture, geography, and everyday life of Italy; and conversation topics that encourage discussion. A variety of instructional methods are used: grammar presentation and exercises, readings in Italian (dialogues, short articles, Italian newspapers, and magazines), original writing and oral discussion. Grading is based on class participation, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination. [Cost:1] [WL:4]

111. First Special Reading Course. (4). (Excl).

Italian 111 and 112 are designed for students interested mainly in the acquisition of a thorough reading knowledge of the language. All of the basic grammar of the language is covered and reading of both fictional and critical materials is required. Open to graduates, undergraduates and to others by special permission. For graduate students, a grade of 8 or better in Italian 112 satisfies the basic reading knowledge requirements for the doctorate. Italian 111 and 112 may not be used to satisfy the LS&A foreign language requirements. Cost: NA WL:4 (Olken)

205. Italian Conversation for Non-concentrators. Italian 102 or equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Italian 205 emphasizes fluency and self-expression in conversational Italian. This course is for students who have had at least two (2) terms of Italian and are interested in acquiring a certain facility with the spoken language. Class work consists of reading materials from various sources (magazines, newspapers, short stories, etc.) which will be discussed in class. Class will meet twice a week. There are no examinations, and the grading is on a credit basis only. Success in the course is determined on the basis of attendance, homework and participation in classroom activities. (Olken)

231. Second-Year Italian. Italian 102 or equivalent; or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

This course reviews grammar, introduces students to standard modern Italian through the reading of short stories, plays and poetry, and increases student facility in writing and speaking Italian. Compositions are required and are based upon reading or other topics of interest. Class discussions and oral reports center on readings or current events. Grading is based on class participation, compositions, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

232. Second-Year Italian, Continued. Italian 231 or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112. (4). (LR).

This course aims at a further development of each student's reading and speaking knowledge of Italian, including increased facility in both conversation and oral comprehension. There is a continuing review of grammar, and the elements of composition. Various genres of literature are read and discussed, and occasional short papers are required on these or other related topics. Oral reports on various topics are also required. Grading is based on short papers, class participation, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination. [Cost:1] [WL:4]

Other Language and Literature Courses

359. Italian Culture and History to the Eighteenth Century. (3). (HU).

The course, which will be taught in English, aims (1) to familiarize students with the major texts of the Italian Medieval and Renaissance worlds; (2) to introduce students to the historical and cultural changes of the period; and (3) to understand the shift from Medieval to Renaissance culture. Texts to be read include:selections from Vittoria Colonna, Gaspara Stampa, Castigione, and Tasso, St. Francis, Provencal poetry, Sicilian poetry, Sweet New Style, Dante's VITA NUOVA and INFERNO, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Ficino, Alberti, Pico della Mirandola, Michelangelo. While not essential, a working knowledge of Italian is useful. [Cost:3] [WL:4] (Frisch)

361. Intermediate Italian. Italian 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

All the basic skills of the language will receive attention in this course, the primary goal of which is the improvement and refinement of oral, reading and writing proficiency. Review of difficult points of grammar will be taken up when necessary, but the major concentration will be on class discussion of short reading materials ranging from newspaper and magazine articles, short fiction and poetry to polemic essays on contemporary cultural, political and social topics. Short essays will be part of the regular assignments, as will occasional prepared oral presentations, and translations. The variety of the materials covered will be as broad as possible to introduce students to the several different writing styles and manner of presentation of the language. The course will be conducted in Italian and will meet three hours weekly. [Cost:1] [WL:4]

374. Topics in Italian Literature. Italian 232. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

This course combines an in-depth analysis of Boccaccio's Decameron with extensive attention to the different critical approaches that have been used to interpret this text. Issues to be addressed include the socio-cultural context in which Boccaccio wrote, his negotiation of medieval literary traditions, the representation of sexuality and sexual difference, as well as the more general problems related to interpreting literary texts and medieval literary texts in particular. We will also view and discuss Pasolini's film-version of the Decameron. Readings will be in English with optional readings in Italian. Requirements: five 2-page papers and one 10-page paper. WL:4 (Moe)

420. Topics and Themes in Modern Italian Literature. One literature course (in any field); knowledge of Italian is not required. (2-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.
Section 001: Subdued Voices in Modern Italian Literature.
From Giovanni Verga's robust and enigmatic peasant women, and Matilde Serao's submissive and frustrated Neopolitan housewives and clerks, Italy's outstanding narrators have chronicled, often unconsciously, cultural and psychological substructures through the slowly changing role of women in a slowly changing society. From the beginnings of the modern period in the late nineteenth century to the second half of the twentieth century, themes of inspiration and disillusionment have dramatized the prevailing realities expressed by these writers. Their realities will be treated in terms of both their literary and polemic context and content, witnessing moments of political, economic, and philosophical crisis, through a succession of varying stylistic expression and mood. Lectures and class discussion in English will be based on a chronological reading of short fiction short stories and novellas from the 1880's through the 1980's. The writers: Luigi Pirandello, Anna Banti, Vasco Protolini, Cesare Pavese, Natalia Ginzburg, Alberto Moravia, Carlo Cassola, and Antonia Tabucchi. Reading may be done in either Italian or English. Short papers, and a final examination.

Section 002: Antonio Gramsci and the Critique of Italian Culture (from Dante to Pirandello). In this course we will examine certain key moments in Italian cultural history from the critical perspectives provided by Antonio Gramsci. We will read selections from Dante's Divine Comedy, Machiavelli's The Prince, Manzoni's The Betrothed, and Pirandello's Liola in conjunction with Gramsci's writings on these texts. We will also consider certain crucial problems in Italian cultural history to which Gramsci devoted his attention: the "language question," popular culture and folklore, the politics of intellectual and literary activity. The course therefore aims to offer students the opportunity to consider significant aspects of Italian culture through the critical lens of one of the twentieth-century's great cultural theorists and, conversely, to study Gramsci's work from the perspective of his relationship to Italian society, politics, and culture. Readings will be in English, with optional readings in Italian. Requirements: three 5-7 page papers. WL:4 (Moe)

Section 003: The Historical Novel in Italy. This is a course in the development of the historical novel in Italy. We will begin with Manzoni's The Betrothed, the "founding father" of modern Italian narrative. Then we will read Verga's Mastrod-on Gesualdo, Lampedusa's The Leopard, and Morante's History: A Novel, all with an eye toward sociohistorical as well as literary questions. In each case, the concept of history as represented in fictional narrative in question) will be shown during the course of the term. Course requirements include two short papers (4-6 pp.), an in class presentation, and a final exam. Readings will be in English and/or in Italian. Prerequisite: WL:4 (Lucente)

Courses in Portuguese (Division 452)

101. Elementary Portuguese. (4). (LR).

This course is designed to give students the ability to understand the Portuguese of everyday life when spoken at a moderate speed, to be understood in typical situations of everyday life, and to read non-technical Portuguese of moderate difficulty. Because of the nature of the materials and the nationality and training of the present staff, students will learn the variety of Portuguese spoken in Brazil by educated speakers. Classroom work involves gradual introduction of Portuguese structure through dialogues and communication exercises which stress listening and speaking. Homework consists of studying grammar, memorizing structures and verb forms and writing exercises. Grading will be based on six hourly quizzes (two partial exams), oral exercises, homework, class participation and attendance and a final exam. Portuguese 101 is offered only in the Fall Term. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

231. Second-Year Portuguese. Portuguese 102 or equivalent. (4). (LR).

Second year Portuguese is designed to develop and enhance the work done in Portuguese 101/102. (See description above). It aims at perfecting writing and speaking skills, and giving students a deeper understanding of the literature, history, and culture of the Portuguese-speaking world. Classroom work involves an intensive grammar review, the study of finer points of Portuguese grammar as made necessary from daily observation of students' writing and speaking performances, oral presentations and discussion of short stories and texts from newspapers and magazines. Homework involves studying grammar, preparing oral presentations, and writing guided essays. Grading is based on quizzes, oral presentations, essays, class participation and attendance, and a final exam. Portuguese 231 is only offered Fall Term. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

Courses in Romance Linguistics (Division 460)

300. Introduction to the Romance Languages. French, Spanish, or Italian: five terms at college level or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

The purposes of this course are to discuss the relationships which exist among the various Romance languages,and to acquaint students with the methods and objectives of Romance linguistics. Following a brief introduction to the methodology of linguistic analysis, the grammatical structures of French, Spanish, Italian, and Rumanian are compared. The course is conducted in English, and all required reading is in English. Students who can read other languages are encouraged to pursue certain topics in these languages. The text is a course pack supplemented by handouts. In recent years, students have come to the course with knowledge of several Romance languages and of general linguistics. This adds to the interest of the course, but should not discourage the student who knows only French or Spanish. [Cost:1] [WL:3] (Leonard)

413(455)/Spanish 413/Educ. D455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics. Permission of concentration adviser. (3). (Excl).

See Spanish 413.

453(553)/French 426. French Phonology and Morphology. French 361 and 362, or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

See French 426. (Hagiwara)

Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school are given a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction. Students who began Spanish at another college or university must also take the placement test.

101. Elementary Spanish. (4). (LR).

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish, this course provides a basic introduction to Spanish grammar and vocabulary, with emphasis placed on developing functional, communicative language skills. Extensive practice in listening, speaking and writing Spanish. Grade based on four departmental tests, final exam, written work and daily oral work.

102. Elementary Spanish, Continued. Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. (4). (LR).

A continuation of Spanish 101; composition and reading skills given more practice. Grade based on three departmental exams, oral exams, other examinations, quizzes, written assignments (including several compositions) and daily oral work. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. Cost: Same texts as 101. WL:4

CSP section available. See the Comprehensive Studies Program (CSP) section in this GUIDE.

103. Review of Elementary Spanish. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

A refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. It prepares students for Spanish 231. Transfer students should elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere. [Cost:2] [WL:4]

231. Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 102, or 103, or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills of students; to review the fundamentals of Spanish grammar; to build vocabulary; and to provide some insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade based on a series of quizzes and exams designed to assess ability to read, write and understand Spanish plus periodic written work and oral class participation.

232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued. Spanish 231 or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

This course is designed to develop fluency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish and to provide a deeper understanding of the literature, history, culture, outlooks, and habits of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade is based on exams, designed to assess ability to speak, understand, read and write Spanish, plus periodic written work (including compositions) and oral class participation. WL:4 (Guzman)

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language.

111. First Special Reading Course. No prerequisite; may not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have already received credit for high school or college Spanish. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for students interested mainly in the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language. They are open to graduates, juniors and seniors; and to others by special permission. For graduate students, a grade of B or better in Spanish 112 satisfies the basic reading knowledge requirement for credit by undergraduates who have already received credit for high school or college Spanish. WL:4 (Milne)

Other Language Courses

358. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators. Spanish 232 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 361 or 362. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 358, 361, and 362 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 358 is a practical Spanish text based conversation course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

361. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 232 or equivalent. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 358, 361, and 362 may be counted toward graduation. (3; 2-4 in the half-term). (Excl).

Spanish 361 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare translations and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in class discussions or presentations.

362. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 232 or equivalent. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 358, 361, and 362 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 362 is intended to improve student's ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in class discussions or presentations.

411(453). Advanced Syntax. Spanish 361 and 362. (3). (Excl).

Advance analysis of various aspects of Spanish syntax: word order, morpheme order, sentence formation rules; some morphology; some dialectology; some history of the language. Research project, mid-term and final exams are required. Prerequisite: Spanish 361 and 362. WL:4

413(455)/Rom. Ling. 413/Educ. D455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics. Permission of concentration adviser. (3). (Excl).

Analysis of basic learning problems such as ser/estar, gustar, por/para, pronoun system, tense system, preterite/ imperfect, subjunctive/indicative, etc. Analysis of teaching methodologies with demonstrations and training. Critical analysis of textbooks, dictionaries and other teaching/learning materials. Research project, mid-term and final exams required. Prerequisite: Permission of Concentration Advisor. WL:4

Literature

331. Spanish and Latin American Literature in Translation. Open to students at all levels. A knowledge of Spanish is not required. May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish (or teaching certificate major or minor). (3). (HU).
Section 001: Worlds of Women.
Drawings from Spanish literature from the 15th century to the present, this course explores fictional worlds dominated by women places like the salons in Maria de Zayas' Enchantments of Love, where ladies meet to tell stories of the battle of the sexes; places like the house of Bernarda Alba, where men never enter, and women suffocate. We will study these texts, written by both men and women, not necessarily as feminist works, but as problems in (and perhaps problems for) gender studies. Texts will include Little Sermons on Sin and Celestina, Maria de Zayas' The Enchantments of Love, The House of Bernarda Alba by Federico Garcia Lorca, and Carmen Martin Gaite's The Back Room, as well as films by Almodovar and Saura. Taught in English; open to students at all level. Requirements: Course journal; mid-term and final exams; final paper. WL:4 (Brown)

350. Independent Studies. Permission of concentration adviser. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once with permission.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office.) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

371. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU).

A study of Spanish literature in the Medieval and Golden Age periods (1000-1700). Students will read several texts of Spanish literature including POEMA DE MIO CID, EL ABENCERRAJE Y LA HERMOSA JARIFA, and LAZARILLO DE TORMES. The discussions will center around a broad cultural background including moral and political themes as well as formal aspects of the texts. There will be one short report to be given orally in class, two 3-4 page papers in Spanish on the texts, and one final exam consisting of essay questions on readings. Students will be evaluated on the basis of papers, exams and class discussion. Methods: lecture-discussion. WL:4 (Casa)

373. Topics in Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

The topic this term is the theater primarily of nineteenth-century Spain. It is possible to study plays as part of literary movements, and of course we shall take note in our analyses of Romantic and Realistic characteristics. Our focus, however, is to be on the play as spectacle. We shall try to see how sentiments struggle with ideas, how audience involvement varies with critical distance, the author's desire to represent grand human problems or those of a specific social class, to show traditional historical verities or current reality. Another issue to involve us is how the rise of the middle class in Spanish life, and particularly as the ticket-buying public, affected theatrical writing. Some of the authors to be read are Zorrilla, Hartzenbusch, Garcia Gutierrez, Breton de los Herreros, Tamayo y Baus, and Galdos. Active class discussions, quizzes, a term paper and final examination constitute the course exercises. Conducted in Spanish. WL:4 (Hafter)

375. Civilizaciòn de Espa a (Spanish Civilization). Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. Spanish 375 and 376 may not both be included in a concentration plan in Spanish. (3). (Excl).

This course will focus on some current issues that confront Spanish democracy. Social, economic, political and cultural aspects of Spanish life will be discussed. For example, what do the Spanish people think about abortion or the relationship between the Church and the State? How has the Spanish economy changed since Spain's entry into the Common Market? Are the Spanish people satisfied with their monarchy and the present socialist government? What do the Spaniards think changed when Spain joined NATO. How did the cultural life improve after the death of the dictator Francisco Franco? The objective of the course is to discuss the contemporary problems as well as the historical origins of these and other questions and to expose students to the perspective that the current democracy introduced. The course will cover information about these issues through readings and lectures. The goal is to stimulate critical thinking by the students and discussion in the class. [WL:4] (Calvo)

381. Introduction to Latin American Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU).

Covers the main Spanish American literary periods, from Rocco, Neoclassicism, Romanticism to Naturalism; poetry, narrative, essay and theatre; and the main authors (Andres Bello, Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, Esteban Echeverria, Jose Hernandex, Ricardo Palma, Jose Marti, Ruben Dario, Gabriele Mistral, Jose Enrique Rodo, Alfonso Reyes, Manuel Ascencio Segura, Gregorio Laferrere, Florencio Sanchez). The concentration is on reading a selection of literary texts. Conducted in Spanish. Lecture and discussion will be the format of the course. Student performance will be evaluated through grades obtained in a) reports; b) midterm exam; c) final exam. Participation in class in encouraged. WL:4

388. Spanish and Spanish-American Literatures Today. A 300-level Spanish course or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).
Section 001: Literature and the Other Arts.
The close relationship between literature and the other arts is not unique to twentieth century literature. However, these exchanges have been crucial in the processes of redefining what is a literary text and how it creates and evokes meaning. In Latin America, the inscriptions of the arts and of music within literary texts are also important as metaphors that bring to the foreground social and cultural issues. Latin American authors, in fact, have been influenced by painting, photography and music in their creative works. In this course we will analyze these semiotic exchanges in selected works of Ruben Dario and other Modernist poets, Vicente Huidobro, Pablo Neruda, Julio Cortazar, Octavio Paz, Rosario Ferre, Margo Su, and Luis Rafael Sanchez, among others. Students who have a particular interest in the visual arts and in music (both classical and popular) are welcome. Requirements include take home essays (in Spanish), a midterm, and a final exam. WL:4

391. Junior Honors Course. Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

In Spanish 391, selected readings chosen from Spain and Spanish America are studied and analyzed through class work, conferences with a senior member of the faculty, written reports, and term papers. This course exists to enable students who have been admitted to the Honors Program to begin research supervised by a faculty sponsor. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Honors Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Honors Committee. The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

435(450). Independent Study. Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 3 credits.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professorguidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Adviser no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office.) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

451(468). Spanish Literature of the Fifteenth Century. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388. (3). (Excl).
Section 001: Encounters with Love.
The end of fifteenth century brought the cultural, political and religious consolidation of the Spanish state and the first exploration of a New World. This course will study the period's exploration and consolidation of a more intimate region, that of love and lovers. We will explore fifteenth-century codifications of a literary discourse of love, the circulation of love-literature through courtly circles and through the newly-invented printing press, and resistance to its dissemination. Readings will include a moral treatise against both love and women (Corbacho), sentimental romance (Carcel de amor), chivalric romance (Tirante el blanco), the bawdy tragicomedy La Celestina), and lyric poetry from the (Cancioneros) and be Ausias March and Santillana. Requirements: course journal; mid-term and final exams; final paper. WL:1 (Brown)

459(485). Don Quijote. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (HU).
Don Quijote
es la cumbre de la literatura espanola y una de las mas importantes de la literatura universal. En ella estan presentes tanto los problemas e ideales y problemas de la epoca de su autor como los de todos los tiempos. La lectura del Quijote es un ejercicio de la mas alta calidad, reconfortante al mismo tiempo que produce una excepcional emocion estetica. El curso tiene como objeto que el estudiante haga una introduccion a la obra que le permita disfrutar tanto de los mundos ideologios de retorico del Quijote. El estudiante debe leer detenidamente la obra y hacer un trabajo sobre un tema especifico, segun la methodologia que el professor require. WL:4

465(471). The Modern Spanish Novel I. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

Benito Perez Galdos, arguably Spain's greatest novelist since Cervantes, is one of the giants of Spanish literature to be analyzed in this study of the nineteenth-century novel. In the period 1870-1900, a constellation of distinguished writers including Juan Valera, Leopoldo Alas ("Clarin"), and Emilia Pardo Bazan added lustre to the achievements of Spanish narrative fiction. But why only in the last thirty years did the novel flourish when, with Don Quijote and the picaresque, seventeenth-century Spain was the creator of the modern realistic European novel? And what does it mean when one says the novel "developed" or that Realism "developed"? And if the novel is not "realistic" (much less "Naturalistic"), what alternatives existed? How do such literary movements reflect philosophical, social, or political activities? These questions and authors will form the course, taught in Spanish, with requirements of hour and final examinations, and a term paper. WL:4

467(420). Literary Movements in Twentieth-Century Spain. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).
Section 001: Modernismo Y Vanguardia.
As one of the course offerings oriented towards the exploration of contacts between the Old World and the New, this course will be concerned with the Spanish American and Spanish components in the phenomena of modernismo and vanguardia, the interaction between Spanish American writers and Spanish ones, and the historical and literary process whereby modernismo gave way to vanguardia. Spanish authors to be studied will include Salavador Rueda, Antonio Machado, Guillermo de Torree, and Rafael Alberti; among the Spanish American authors, Ruben Dario, Vicente Huidobro, Cesar Vallejo and Pablo Neruda, all of whom were drawn to Europe. We shall also consider some poetic accounts of travel to the New World: Juan Ramon Jimenez's Diario de un poeta recien casado and Federico Garcia Lorca's Poeta en Nueva York. Teaching will be by lecture, class discussion and student presentations. Several short papers will be assigned. The class will be conducted exclusively in Spanish. Cost:3 WL:4 (Anderson)

475(488). Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.
Section 001: MADE IN THE USA: CONTEMPORARY U.S. LATINA/O LITERATURE.
This course will study the recent writing of Chicano/os, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and other U.S. Latina/os, focusing particularly on the ways that identity and nationally are represented in them. These texts question, in differing degrees, received national mythologies of identity in the U.S., and through the exploration of cultural and other differences, suggest instead, new constructions of U.S. American identities. Prerequisite: WL:4 (Perez)

491. Senior Honors Course. Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Students who successfully complete the Junior year Honors sequence are eligible to elect the senior year sequence (Spanish 490 and 491). In Spanish 491 the focus is upon selected topics, authors, literary movements, or genres chosen from Spain or Spanish America depending on the needs of the student. The student will study and analyze the subject, supervised by a senior member of the faculty. A description of the project and required exercises to be completed must be submitted to the Honors Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Honors Committee. The committee is to receive any lengthy paper submitted in the course. Prerequisite: Open only to seniors by permission of the Departmental Honors Committee.


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