Courses in Chemistry (Division 334)

The Chemistry Department has three types of courses available for students starting out toward careers in any of the sciences, engineering, or medicine. Students are placed into these courses according to the results of the tests in chemistry and mathematics that they take during orientation. In addition there are two distribution course, Chem 101 offered in the Fall Term and Chem 100, in the Winter Term.

For students interested in the sciences, engineering or medicine, either Chem 130 or Chem 210/211 can be their starting point. Students who have had a strong course in high school (which may include AP credit in chemistry) are advised to start in Chem 210 and 211, the laboratory course that accompanies it. Chem 130 is recommended for all other students. Section 400 of Chem 130 is reserved for students who would benefit from a smaller lecture section and more frequent contact with both senior faculty and teaching assistants.

Students who have had little or no laboratory work in high school should plan to elect Chem 125 with Chem 130. other students electing Chem 130 may postpone laboratory to a subsequent term.

125. General and Inorganic Chemistry: Laboratory. To be elected by students who are eligible for (or enrolled) Chem. 130. (2). (NS).

This laboratory course can be elected with, or following, Chem 130 or 230. It is intended that students planning to enroll in Chem 130 that have had little or no previous chemistry laboratory enroll concurrently in Chem 125. The focus of this guided inquiry laboratory is to foster critical thinking that allows students to design, perform, and interpret experiments. An emphasis is placed on what constitutes valid data and provides the burden of proof for testing hypotheses and theories. In addition, the student acquires technical skills that are required for further advancement in experimental sciences. Although an ability to collect and analyze data in a quantitative manner is developed, the emphasis of the course is to provide a qualitative understanding of the basic concepts of chemistry. This is accomplished by demonstrating that chemical principles are derived from experimental data. The format of the course is organized into three sections. Pre-laboratory reading and questions are completed prior to the four-hour laboratory. The second component is performance in the laboratory. The third begins in the last hour of the laboratory where individual data are shared, evaluated, and discussed. Students then provide a laboratory report based on the combined data of the section. A one-hour lecture provides support for the topics that are investigated in the laboratory. Microcomputer simulations also supplement the student's laboratory experience. There are two one-hour written examinations, scheduled for Tuesday evenings, that constitute 25% of the grade. The remaining 75% of the grade is based on the acquired in the laboratory points. Refer to the Time Schedule for examination dates and times. Cost:2 WL:2 (Penner-Hahn, Kerner)

130. General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles. Three years of high school math or Math. 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department. Intended for students without AP credit in chemistry. No credit granted to those who have completed Chem. 123 or 124. (3). (NS).

This General Chemistry course is intended to fulfill the one term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably 130, 210/211, 215/216, 340 etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students. Chemistry 130 is intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry.

Chemistry 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced both to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In Chem 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. Chem 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate teaching assistants (the Comprehensive Study Program discussion class will meet three times a week). Lecturers and teaching assistants will have scheduled office hours for after class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, 3 one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights) and a final examination. See Time Schedule for examination times and dates.

The intensive lecture section (section 400) is intended for those students who would benefit from a smaller lecture section (maximum 100 students) and more lectures so that the pace is slower and there is more feedback. Placement by LS&A testing or permission of the the Chemistry Department (Room 1500 Chemistry) is needed for enrollment in this section. The CSP discussion section is intended for those students who would benefit from more group study meetings with a graduate teaching assistant. Permission of the Comprehensive Studies Program is needed for enrollment in this section. Cost:4 WL:2 (Rasmussen, Hallada)

210. Structure and Reactivity I. High school chemistry. Placement by examination during Orientation. To be taken with Chem. 211. (4). (NS).

Chemistry 210 is the first course in a two-term sequence in which the major concepts of chemistry are introduced in the context of organic chemistry. Emphasis is on the development of the capacity of students to think about the relationship between structure and reactivity and to solve problems in a qualitatively analytical way. This course is a particularly good first course for students with AP credit in chemistry, Honors students and other students with a strong interest in chemistry and biology. The course has three lectures with the professor and one hour of discussion with a teaching assistant per week. There are three hour examinations (Tuesday nights) and a final examination. See Time Schedule for examination times and dates.

NOTE: This course is linked to Chemistry 211. The recitation sections for Chemistry 210 and the corresponding laboratory sections for Chemistry 211 are listed together in the Time Schedule under Chemistry 210. Students must elect both Chemistry 210 (for 4 credit hours) and Chemistry 211 (for 1 credit hour). Cost:3 WL:2

211. Investigations in Chemistry. To be taken with Chem. 210. (1). (NS).

Chemistry 211 is an laboratory introduction to methods of investigation in inorganic and organic chemistry. Students solve individual problems using microscale equipment and a variety of techniques such as thin layer chromatography, titrations, and spectroscopy. The course consists of a four-hour laboratory period with a teaching assistant under the supervision of the professor. Students keep laboratory notebooks, which also serve as laboratory reports. Grades are based on performance in the laboratory and the laboratory notebooks.

NOTE: This course is linked to Chemistry 210. The laboratory sections for Chemistry 211 are listed in the Time Schedule along with the recitations sections for Chemistry 210. Students must elect both Chemistry 210 (for 4 credit hours) and Chemistry 211 (for 1 credit hour). Cost:1 WL:2

215. Structure and Reactivity II. Chem. 210, 211. To be taken with Chem. 216. (3). (NS).

The emphasis on thinking about structure and reactivity started in Chemistry 210 is continued in Chemistry 215, with the student learning to analyze more complicated structures, ultimately being able to understand and predict the reactivity of large molecules of biological importance, such as carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. The course has three examinations (Tuesday nights) and a final examination. See Time Schedule for examination times and dates.

NOTE: This course is linked to Chemistry 216. The laboratory sections for Chemistry 216 are listed in the Time Schedule under Chemistry 215. Students must elect both Chemistry 215 (for 3 credit hours) and Chemistry 216 (for 2 credit hour). Cost:1 WL:2

216. Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Compounds. Chem. 210, 211. Must be taken with Chem. 215. (2). (NS).

Chemistry 216 builds on the experimental approach started in Chemistry 211. Students participate in planning exactly what they are going to do in the laboratory by being given general goals and directions that have to be adapted to fit the specific project they will be working on. They use microscale equipment, which requires them to develop manual dexterity and care in working in the laboratory. They also evaluate the results of their experiments by checking for identity and purity using various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Students will be expected to keep a laboratory notebook that will serve as the basis for their laboratory reports.

NOTE: This course is linked to Chemistry 215. The laboratory sections for Chemistry 216 are listed in the Time Schedule under Chemistry 215. Students must elect both Chemistry 215 (for 3 credit hours) and Chemistry 216 (for 2 credit hour). Cost:1 WL:2

219(319). Independent Study. Permission of instructor. For students with less than junior standing. (1). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 4 credits.

Research in an area of interest to, and supervised by, a Departmental faculty member. The Chemistry Department encourages students to get involved with undergraduate research as early as possible. The Counseling Office, 1500 Chemistry Building, provides information and help to students in meeting with faculty members to discuss research opportunities. Exact details such as nature of the research, level of involvement of the student, credit hours awarded and criteria for grading are individually determined in consultation with the faculty member. The student is expected to put in at least three hours a week of actual work for a 14-week term for each credit hour elected. At the end of each term, three copies of a written report are submitted, one for the Counseling Office, one for the student, and one for the faculty supervisor.

For a student to receive Chemistry credit for Chemistry 219, the student must work on a research project supervised by a faculty member of the Chemistry Department, either alone, or in collaboration with a colleague within the department, from another department, or from another school. This collaboration must be an ongoing one, and the student must receive direct supervision by all of the faculty who have agreed to sponsor the project. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the faculty member from the Chemistry Department. Cost:1 WL:3

230. Physical Chemical Principles and Applications. Chem. 215 or permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Chem. 340. (3). (NS).

This General Chemistry course is intended as the fourth term in chemistry for science concentrators and pre-professional students, completing the 2-year chemistry sequence required by, for example, the medical, dental, and engineering programs. Students who plan to continue beyond a fourth term in chemistry would typically enroll in Chemistry 340 instead of Chemistry 230; credit will not be given for both of these courses. In Chemistry 230, students will be introduced to the physical principles underlying some of the major topics of inorganic and analytical chemistry. We will study the liquid and solid states of matter, phase transitions, solutions, electrochemistry, coordination complexes, spectroscopy and the principles of thermodynamics that explain observed chemical reactions. These topics will be treated from the viewpiont of the experimental scientist, with an emphasis on the application of chemical principles to a wide range of professions. Chemistry 230 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate teaching assistants. Lecturers and teaching assistants will have scheduled office hours for after class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, 3 one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights) and a final examination. See Time Schedule for examination times and dates. Cost:3 WL:2

302. Inorganic Chemistry: Principles of Structure, Reactivity, and Function. Chem. 215 and 216, or permission of instructor. (3). (NS).

This course in Inorganic Chemistry is intended to introduce students to the properties of the elements and the compounds that they form. The course should be used by students concentrating in chemistry, chemical engineering or cellular and molecular biology as third in the four term sequence Chemistry 210/211, 215/216, 302 and 340. This course will provide an introduction to the structure and properties of those elements other than carbon. Topics that will be included are the electronic structure of atoms, molecules and extended solids, bonding, periodicity, main group and transition element chemistry, catalysis and bioinorganic chemistry. Several lectures will be devoted to novel and emergent concepts and phenomena, such as, for example, ceramic superconductors, fundamental and applied chemistry of organometallics, inorganic polymers and materials chemistry. Chemistry 302 will meet for one hour, three times each week with a senior faculty member and once a week with a teaching assistant in groups of approximately 25. Lecturers and teaching assistants will have scheduled office hours. Course grades will be determined from one-hour in class exams and a final examination. See Time Schedule for examination times and dates. Cost:3 WL:2

312. Synthesis and Characterization. Chem. 215 and 216. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 302. (2). (Excl).

Chemistry 312 introduces students to advanced techniques used in the synthesis, purification, and characterization of inorganic and organic compounds. The course emphasizes methods for handling air-sensitive material such as organo-metallic compounds, and includes syringe techniques, working under vacuum or inert gas atmospheres, vacuum distillations as well as various chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. The course meets in two 4-hour laboratory periods. Some of that time may be used for discussion of techniques and principles. Grades are based on laboratory performance. Cost:2 WL:2

340. Principles of Physicochemical Measurements and Separations. Math. 116 or 114, Chem. 215/216. Prior enrollment in Chem. 302 is recommended but not required. Those who have completed Chem. 230 may elect Chem. 340 for 2 credits only. (5). (NS).

Chemistry 340 is a continuation of Chemistry 130, 210/211, 215/216, and is designed primarily for students in the biological and chemical sciences. The course emphasizes fundamental physical principles and analytical applications of thermochemistry, equilibria, kinetics, separations and spectroscopy. The physical chemistry underlying many important analytical procedures is developed in lecture. Analytical applications are further developed through laboratory experience and include computer acquisition and analysis of experimental data, modern physicochemical measurements, and techniques used in chemical separations. The course has 3 lectures, one hour of lab discussion and 7 hours of laboratory per week. Grading is based on performance in the laboratory and on hour examinations, problem sets, and a final examination. Cost:3 WL:2

396. Honors Physical Chemistry. Chem. 340; Math. 215 or 285, Phys. 240 and 241; and permission of instructor or chemistry Honors adviser. (4). (Excl).

First course in a two part series in physical chemistry for Honors students and chemistry concentrators. Other students elect the chemistry 468 and 469 series. Lectures and discussions. Cost:3 WL:2

399. Undergraduate Research. Junior standing, and permission of a chemistry concentration adviser and the professor who will supervise the research. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of 4 credits during junior or senior year.

Elected starting in the junior or senior year, this course is a requirement for B.S. Chemistry students, who must elect it for a total of four credits spread out over two or more terms. The student is expected to put in at least three hours a week of actual work for each credit hour elected. At the end of each term, a written report evaluating the progress of the project is submitted; one copy to the faculty member, one copy for the Counseling Office and one copy for the student. Interim reports need not be lengthy, but the final report for Chemistry 399 is expected to be more detailed and longer than the reports in 219.

For a student to receive Chemistry credit for Chemistry 399, the student must work on a research project supervised by a faculty member of the Chemistry Department, either alone, or in collaboration with a colleague within the department, from another department, or from another school. This collaboration must be an ongoing one, and the student must receive direct supervision by all of the faculty who have agreed to sponsor the project. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the faculty member from the Chemistry Department. Cost:1 WL:3

400. Philosophy, Principles and Practice for Chemical Science Teachers: Integrating the Precollegiate Lecture and Laboratory. Chem. 130; or permission of instructor. May not be included in a concentration plan in chemistry. (2). (Excl).

A lecture course where fundamental chemistry concepts will discussed, with an emphasis of translating these ideas into integrated lecture and laboratory work for the precollege classroom. These topics include: chemical reactions; quantitative methods; recording observations; data collections and analysis; written and oral communication; philosophical, historical, and social contexts for science instruction. During 1991-1993, students in Chemistry 400 should also register for Chemistry 401, Science Methods (Ed. 421) and Practicum (Ed. 307). Three examinations, periodic quizzes and written assignments will be used as a basis for evaluation. Cost:3 WL:3 (Coppola)

401. Philosophy, Principles and Practice for Chemical Science Teachers: Curriculum Enrichment for Precollegiate Chemistry. Chem. 130; or permission of instructor. May not be included in a concentration plan in chemistry. (2). (Excl).

A lecture and laboratory course that includes the practical operations and techniques of chemistry. An emphasis is placed on translating these activities into integrated lecture and laboratory work for the precollege classroom. The techniques include measurement, determining chemical and physical properties, separation, identification, and instrumentation methods. During 1991-1993, students in Chemistry 401 should also register for Chemisty 400, Science Methods (Ed. 421) and Practicum (Ed. 307). Laboratory and other written assignments will be used as a basis for evaluation. Cost:3 WL:3 (Coppola)

447. Physical Methods of Analysis. Chem. 340, and 215/216. (3). (Excl).

The course introduces the student to the principles and techniques of modern analytical chemistry. Atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chromatographic separation techniques are stressed. Some discussion of contemporary electrochemistry is included. The principles of data collection and the processing and representation of analytical signals are introduced. The course format is lectures three times per week. A textbook is required. Readings from the review literature of analytical chemistry compensate for the inevitable shortcomings of any text. Cost:3 WL:2

468. Physical Chemistry. Phys. 240 and 241, Math. 215, and Chem. 340. (4). (Excl).

This is the first of two-term lecture sequence in Physical Chemistry (followed by Chemistry 469). The course is normally elected by students in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Cellular and Molecular Biology and others requiring a rigorous treatment of Physical Chemistry. Topics covered in Chemistry 468: theory of gases; the laws of thermodynamics with applications to chemical and phase equilibria, solutions and electrochemical cells; introduction to statistical mechanics. Cost:3 WL:2

469. Physical Chemistry. Phys. 240 and 241, Math. 216, and Chem. 340. (4). (Excl).

This course is the second of the regular two-term sequence in physical chemistry (Chemistry 468 and 469). The topics include quantum chemistry, molecular structure, spectroscopy and chemical kinetics. Cost:3 WL:2

479. Technical Communication in Chemistry. Concurrent enrollment in Chem. 480. (1). (Excl).

This course is for students who wish to meet the English Composition Board requirements for a Junior/Senior writing course in chemistry. The course will meet once a week with a senior faculty member to discuss issues involved in technical writing. Students will also have conferences with the faculty and a teaching assistant trained by the English Composition Board to find out how to improve their writing, which will be based primarily on the laboratory reports prepared for Chemistry 480. Therefore, coelection of Chemistry 480 is required. Selected reports will be intensively critiqued and rewritten in several drafts. Grading will be based on the writing achieved in the course. Cost:1 WL:2

480. Physical and Instrumental Chemistry. Chem. 447 and 468, or 396; and concurrent enrollment in Chem. 469 or 397. (3). (Excl).

This course explores methods for the measurement of the physical and spectroscopic properties of substances and the application of these methods in instrumental analysis. The course is focused on essential laboratory principles and operations as they relate to the physicochemical properties of organic, inorganic, and macromolecular chemical species. Experiments study the areas of equilibria, chemical structure, chemical change, and computer simulation and calculation. Emphasis is placed on the effective design of experiments together with synergistic coupling of modern instrumentation and computers. The course includes literature searches for physical data. Laboratory reports constitute an important component of the course. Students who wish to use the course to meet the English Composition Board requirements for a writing course in chemistry must elect Chemistry 479 concurrently. Ten to twelve hours a week in the laboratory. Grading is based on laboratory performance, laboratory records, and reports. WL:2

485. Projects Laboratory. Chem. 480 or the equivalent. (2). (Excl).

A project-oriented laboratory in which students work on one or two projects in depth during the term. The projects are suggested by the faculty of the department and require library as well as laboratory work. The projects may be in any area of analytical, inorganic, organic, physical, or polymer chemistry. Students interested in projects in inorganic or organic chemistry should elect section 100, 200, or 300. Students interested in analytical or physical chemistry should elect section 400 or 500. Eight hours a week in the laboratory. Grading is based on laboratory performance and a written report for each project undertaken. Cost:1 WL:2

499. Undergraduate Thesis. Chem. 399 and permission of instructor. To be elected in the term in which an Honors student presents a thesis on undergraduate research. (1). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

To be elected in the term in which an Honors student presents a thesis on undergraduate research. Cost:1 WL:3 (Coppola)

565. Nuclear Chemistry. Permission of instructor. Intended for graduate students and seniors. (3). (Excl).

The properties of the nucleus and a review of techniques for studying properties. Radioactive decay processes, nuclear models, nuclear reactions, and interactions of radiation with matter; applications of nuclear techniques to non-nuclear problems.


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