Romance Languages and Literatures

French, Italian, and Spanish Placement Tests

If you are planning to take an elementary French, Italian, or Spanish class and you are a new student, freshman or transfer student, or you have not yet begun the elementary language sequence on the Ann Arbor campus, you must take the placement test in order to register for the correct course. You must register for the class into which you have been placed.

If you have registered for a class prior to taking the test, you will still be required to take the test in order to verify that you are in the appropriate level class.

If you have already taken French, Italian, or Spanish 101-232 on the Ann Arbor campus, or if you have already taken the placement test once, you are not eligible to take the test again. For questions regarding the LS&A language requirement, please see a general academic advisor or call POINT-10 (764-6810).

Please Note: With the reduction in the number of classrooms throughout LS&A, departments must limit the number of classes offered between 10 am and 4 pm. There will be more classes open before 10 am and after 4 pm. Please take advantage of the opportunity to register for these classes and avoid the "Lottery" (see 2b below).

Instructions for students requesting overrides for French or Spanish 101, 103, 231, or 232.

1. Try to find a section that will fit into your schedule, since the Department cannot guarantee every student a space in a section of his/her own choice.

However, do not register for a class that you cannot attend. You will not be eligible to override into the section of your choice if you are registered for any section of 101-232, even if you cannot attend that section.

2. As it states in the Time Schedule any registered student who misses one of the first four class meetings will be dropped from the course, thereby leaving some open spaces for those students who have been closed out.

If there is absolutely no section open which will fit your schedule, you should follow this procedure:

(a) Start attending the section you would like to get into on the first day of class. You will receive a Proof of Attendance form which must be signed by your instructor every day. You must attend a class every day, but it does not need to be the same section. All students must take action at CRISP to make sure their official schedule of courses matches the courses they are taking.

(b) On Wednesday, September 15 at 7:00 p.m., there will be a meeting in the basement of the MLB, rooms to be announced later, for each of the above courses. At these meeting, students will be assigned to remaining vacated spaces in the most fair and equitable manner possible, using a lottery system. At no time, however, will any class be allowed to exceed 25 students. Students must bring their CRISP Official Printout of Classes and the Proof of Attendance form to the meeting!

3. Please note that you will not be allowed to change sections at the French meetings. Beginning Thursday, September 16, Elementary French Language Supervisors will hear requests for section changes and fill those requests to whatever degree is possible.

4. Please ensure when adding with the override that you also add modifiers for pass/fail, etc.

Courses in French (Division 371)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school must take a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction. Students who began French at another college or university also take the placement test.

101. Elementary French. Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

The sequence of French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture which are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials. Classes meet four hours per week in sections of 20-25 students. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as midterm and final examinations and speaking tests. Class participation is graded. Students with any prior study of French should NOT enroll in sections.

102. Elementary French, Continued. French 101 or equivalent. French 102 may be followed by 231. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. (4). (LR).

See French 101. It is Strongly suggested that transfer students see H.Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course.

103. Review of Elementary French. Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

French 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in French 101/102. Entrance into the course is by placement, or with the permission of the course coordinator. Because students are expected to be already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace, and students will need to plan on spending at least 8-10 hours each week preparing daily lessons. The objectives and methods of instruction are similar to those of French 101/102. Frequent quizzes (with both oral and written components) are administered to check students' assimilation of material. There are two hourly exams, a final and speaking tests. By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French (both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language.

231. Second-Year French. French 102, or 103, or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Students whose last French course was NOT at U of M Ann Arbor must take the placement test. The sequence French 231/232 are the third and fourth terms of language study offered. It presents a comprehensive grammar review, study of finer points of French structure, and the reading of journalistic prose, short stories, and literary excerpts. Both courses include the use of French movies and video. The proficiency gained by the end of French 232 should enable students to express themselves in French on topics of interest, to understand conversations on such topics. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of grammar study, written exercises, and laboratory work both audio and video. There are comprehensive coursewide tests as well as the midterm and final examinations.

232. Second-Year French, Continued. French 231 or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

In French 232, students will continue learning and reviewing vocabulary and grammar from the second half of the book Ensuite. There will be short weekly readings (advertisements, literary, excerpts, and short stories) and by the middle of the term, students will begin reading a full-length French novel!! (They will read the majority of the novel on their own and take a reading comprehension test at the end of the term). Throughout the term, students will listen to French songs, see several videos (from French television) as well as two French movies. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. In addition to the outside reading test, there will be 3 course wide tests, a midterm, and a final examination.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of these courses does not satisfy the LS&A language requirement.

111. First Special Reading Course. May not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have received credit for college French. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

This course is for undergraduate and graduate students who wish to gain a good reading knowledge of French in one term. The essentials of French grammar as well as vocabulary and idioms are presented for recognition, followed by extensive translation and sight-reading exercises on materials taken from both humanities and sciences. The skills gained in the course should enable students to read technical writings of moderate difficulty. Toward the end of the term students select an article or a chapter of a book in their field of interest for outside reading. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations. Cost:2 WL:4

Other Language Courses

305. Practical French. French 232 or equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

French 305 is a mini-course for students who would like to keep up with their French in an informal atmosphere. Cultural and intellectual readings provide topics of conversation. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 20-25 students. There are no examinations, and attendance, homework and active participation in classroom activities determine the credit/no credit grades.

350. Independent Study. French 232 or the equivalent and permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT) May be elected for a total of six hours credit.

French 350 is an Independent Study course which may be offered to undergraduate students who demonstrate the need to study some specific language aspect of French, phonetics (in this case it must not correspond in any way to French 325), grammar, style and translation included. The course may be elected for up to 6 hours of credit, but that option should be exceptional. Generally 3 credits are granted if the course work is as intensive as any regular course at the 300 level. The type of requirement for the final grade must be specifically indicated: examination or other. In all cases the student petitioning for independent student 350 and the supporting instructor must demonstrate that the course is needed and that no other regular course may be taken as a substitute.

361. Intermediate French. French 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).
Section 001: De Marianne à Ariane.
The course is designed to help you expand your knowledge of some aspects of contemporary France, and see how traditions and contemporary concerns intermingle in France on the eve of the 21st century. Lectures will deal with topics ranging from education, history and geography, to integral parts of everyday life such as family, cafes and leisure. These topics will be used as the basis for discussion and writing in the sections for which students will be asked to read articles and work with videos. The final grade will take into account your active participation, bimonthly papers, in-class exams, oral presentations and final.

362. Advanced French. French 361 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

French 362 is neither a literature nor a grammar class. It is designed as a bridge between the highly structured activities of language courses and the more independent work required in literature and civilization courses. French 362 has two main objectives: (1) to help students improve their written and oral fluency; (2) to familiarize students with the linguistic and analytic tools necessary to approach a document, whether a literary text, a newspaper article, or a video document. Used as the basis of round-table discussions and written exercises, these documents will help students increase their ability to write and converse fluently on different themes presented in class. Active classroom participation is essential, and is part of the final grade. All classes are taught in French. Bi-monthly essays, 2 in-class exams, one final examination.

371. Writing French. French 361. (3). (Excl).

The main objective of the course is to develop the skills necessary to writing correct, fluent French. In order to achieve it we will work on three levels: (a) development and reinforcement of correct grammar through presentation of specific syntactic problems, practice exercises, and individual diagnosis of students' writing; (b) development of vocabulary (elimination of faux-amis, finding "le mot juste"); (c) development of quality in composition from imitation to creation (learning how to organize an essay and how to write in tight sparse prose). Students are expected to write frequent essays. In the second half of the term, each student will work on his/her own diary (journal). Final course grade will reflect the students' progress, and participation in class. This course is elected primarily but not exclusively by students concentrating in French. No Auditors. (Gabrielli)

428/Rom. Ling. 456/Educ. D456. Teaching French/Applications of Linguistics. Permission of concentration adviser. (3). (Excl).

Phonology, morphology, syntax, and psycholinguistics. Discussions of theories are combined with practical problem-solving. Students are introduced to different fields of linguistics, a contrastive study of English and French phonology; a linguistic method of analyzing the French language; problems of teaching pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary; and an evaluation of different teaching methods, techniques, and available materials. The course is conducted in English. Class time is divided into lectures, discussions, and travaux pratiques. No previous knowledge of linguistics or phonetics is needed.

Civilization

214/Hist. 214. Interpretations of French Society and Culture. (3). (Excl).

What is a revolution? Is a revolution in politics comparable to one in literature or painting? What is the relation between political and artistic representation? Is there something specifically "French" about the preceding questions? Starting from these questions, this course offers a broad introduction to the last 225 years of French political, social, and cultural life. While it outlines the Revolution of 1789 and the student revolt of May 1968, it also considers the development of revolutionary artistic movements such as Impressionism and Surrealism. A broad survey course, this class presupposes no previous study of French history. In addition to the Great Revolution of 1789 and the events of May 1968, possible case studies include: Romanticism; Art Mouveau; New Wave cinema; and perhaps even the rise and fall of haute couture. Conducted in English; sone readings will be available in both French and English. (Spang)

381. Themes in French Literature and Culture. French 232 or equivalent. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001 The Fantastic in Modern French Literature.
In this course we will explore some of the forms and themes of the fantastic through readings of 19th and 20th century French authors: romantics and modernists like Gautier, Nerval, Balzac, Baudelaire, and surrealists like Breton, Leonora Carrington, Giséle Prassinos, Joyce Mansour. What do the hybrid creatures and terrifying distortions of the fantastic reveal about contemporary social and sexual anxieties? How is the fantastic to be read? These are some of the questions that we will try to answer in this course. Evaluation will be based on four to five essays in French and participation in class. Cost:2 WL:1 (Clej).

384. Origins of Contemporary France: From the Gauls to de Gaulle. French 361. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.
Section 001: Une Histoire de la France.
Choix de quelques grandes périodes, grands tourants ou grands bouleversements dits historiques dans l'itinéraire-type suivant: de Versailles à l'Elysée par la Révolution, Austerlitz et Waterloo, Alger, Strasbourg et la Pyramide de Louvre. Aussi, la situation politique et sociale de la France d'aujourd'hui, membre de l'Europe des Douze, au soir de XXème siècle, sera étudiée. Cours enseigné en français. Participation active et réaction critique attendues. Travaux de groupes. Quatre devoirs de 4 à 6 pages chacun. No final. No auditors. (Gabrielli)

Literature

387/388/389 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE.

The objective of this series of courses is to acquaint students with significant literary works and literary theories drawn from the entire range of French literature. Each work is analyzed (in French) individually for its own merit and is then placed within the context of its period. Students are asked to read carefully the assigned works, to reflect on them, and to express their reactions and ideas in class. The instructor holds class discussions, points out the artistic values of the work, and attempts in many cases to show the evolution of literature as it reflects various external factors. Grades may be based on discussions, papers, and a midterm and/or final examination.

388. Introduction to French Literature (1800 to 1900). French 232. (3). (HU).
Section 001.
This course will focus on five of the most important writers of 19th century French literature, namely Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Zola and Maupassant. Emphasis will be placed on the literary aspects of the works read as well as the historical, political and artistic context of the day. A typical assignment will consist of reading some twenty pages of a given work and preparing to discuss them in class. Students will write four papers in French (three or four pages in length). Each paper will be corrected for grammar, choice of expression and content. The course grade will be based on the results of written work and on classroom participation. Regular attendance is required. There is no final examination. The course is conducted in French. Cost:2 WL:4 (Gray)

389. Introduction to French Literature (1900 to present). French 232. (3). (HU).
Section 001.
An introduction to methods of literary study through the discussion of selected works of the twentieth century. We will examine the significance of formal characteristics of literary works (narrative, theater, and lyric poetry), and develop techniques of analysis suited to each type. We will also explore the relationship between literary form and social context. Particular attention will be paid to how the structures of the French language shape the experience related in the literary works we will read, and to how writers use language to create a fiction of the individual. Readings will include Apollinaire, Calligrammes; Proust, Conbray; Sartre, La Nausee; Beckett, Fin De Partie; and Duras, L'amant. Required work: 3 short (4-5 page) papers, midterm, and final examination. (Graham)

Section 002. An introduction to methods of literary study through the discussion of selected works of the twentieth century. We will examine the significance of formal characteristics of literary works (narrative, theater, and lyric poetry), and develop techniques of analysis suited to each type. We will also explore the relationship between literary form and social context. Particular attention will be paid to how the structures of the French language shape the experience related in the literary works we will read, and how writers use language to create a fiction of the individual.

391. Junior Honors Course. Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

This course is conducted as a tutorial for qualified juniors intending to continue with Honors work in French but not participating in a junior-year-in-France program. Subjects and approaches are selected to fit the needs of individual students.

440. Le cinéma français. French 361 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

This is a course in the history of French and Francophone cinema and cinema theory, beginning with the work of the early filmmakers Lumière and Méliès, through the Poetic Realism of the 30s, the New Wave, and recent French film. For further details, please contact the Dept. of Romance Languages.

450. Independent Studies. Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

The work to be done should not be the same as that offered in a regular course. A written description of the project together with an appropriate bibliography must be submitted for initial approval to the proposed instructor of the course and then to the concentration adviser for final approval prior to the beginning of the term during which the independent study is to be undertaken.

460. Topics and Themes in French Literature. Two of French 386, 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Section 001 The Medieval Storyteller. This course studies the craft of the medieval storyteller and the culture in which s/he performed. We will begin with an examination of storytelling in the oral tradition, using Camara Laye's transcription of a modern oral performance of medieval African tales, and then move on to storytelling in the mixed oral-written court culture of medieval France. We will be concerned both with the perennial themes of tales (sexuality, religion, death, transgression) and with how each telling (and reading) of a tale reveals a specific cultural and historical moment. Readings: Camara Laye, Le Maitre De La Parole; La Chanson De Roland; Lais; Chretien de Troyes' Erec Et Enide; the Welsh tale Gereint And Enid. There will also be some secondary reading (historical and psychological background). Required work: active participation in class discussions, midterm exam, two 5-page analyses of single stories, a 10-page final paper, and oral presentation. (Graham)

Section 002 Les Contes de Fées. The course will examine the texts of a number of fairy tales from the French tradition and investigate the different levels of meanings which can be elicited. The structure of the tales, characters, events told will be studied in the light of psychological and anthropological studies. The aim of the study is to come closer to a theory of construction of fairy tales as well as a theory on the nature and role of man's imaginary. The texts will be read in French, and all the class work will be done in French. There will be several papers and oral presentations during the term and a final paper either on one specific tale or on a group of tales. The paper should explore the structure of the text or texts in depth, bringing out also all the possible levels of meaning (interpretation). No final examination. (Mermier)

470. African/Caribbean Literature in French. A literature course in French, and a knowledge of French. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

For details of this course, please contact the Department of Romance Languages.

Courses in Italian (Division 399)

Elementary Language Courses

101. Elementary Italian. (4). (LR).

This course has as its primary objective the acquisition of a fundamental understanding of basic Italian grammar with parallel emphasis on conversation. Text, workbook and lab manual required; Italian 101 covers the first half of the text. Course topics include: (1) fundamental sentence structure, (2) verb conjugations, (3) adjectives, adverbs, and sentence agreement, and (4) nouns, pronouns, and conjunctive pronouns and their position. Methods of instruction include: (1) grammar drill, (2) conversation exercises, (3) translation both oral and written, and (4) weekly quizzes. Grading is based on quizzes, class participation, midterm, and a final examination. Cost:3 WL:1

102. Elementary Italian. Italian 101 or equivalent. (4). (LR).

This course continues the presentation of the essentials of the Italian language and attempts to broaden the student's knowledge of Italian life and culture. Conversation in the language is also emphasized. The course covers the second half of the text with workbook and lab manual; readings supplements this set of texts. Course topics include a continuation of Italian grammar; use of idiomatic expression; the culture, geography, and everyday life of Italy; and conversation topics that encourage discussion. A variety of instructional methods are used: grammar presentation and exercises, readings in Italian (dialogues, short articles, Italian newspapers, and magazines), original writing and oral discussion. Grading is based on class participation, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination. Cost:3 WL:1

205. Italian Conversation for Non-concentrators. Italian 102 or equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Italian 205 emphasizes fluency and self-expression in conversational Italian. This course is for students who have had at least two (2) terms of Italian and are interested in acquiring a certain facility with the spoken language. Class work consists of reading materials from various sources which will be discussed in class. Class will meet twice a week. There are no examinations, and the grading is on a credit basis only. Success in the course is determined on the basis of attendance, homework and participation in classroom activities.

231. Second-Year Italian. Italian 102 or equivalent; or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

This course reviews grammar, introduces students to standard modern Italian through the reading of magazine and newspaper articles, short stories, plays and poetry, and increases student facility in writing and speaking Italian. Compositions are required and are based upon reading or other topics of interest. Class discussions and oral reports center on readings or current events. Grading is based on class participation, compositions, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination. Cost:2

232. Second-Year Italian, Continued. Italian 231 or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112. (4). (LR).

This course aims at a further development of each student's reading and speaking knowledge of Italian, including increased facility in both conversation and oral comprehension. There is a continuing review of grammar, and the elements of composition. Various genres of literature are read and discussed, and occasional short papers are required on these or other related topics. Oral reports on various topics are also required. Grading is based on short papers, class participation, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination. Cost:1 WL:4

Other Language and Literature Courses

359. Italian Culture and History to the Eighteenth Century. (3). (HU).

The course, which will be taught in English, aims (1) to familiarize students with the major texts of the Italian Medieval and Renaissance worlds; (2) to introduce students to the historical and cultural changes of the period; and (3) to understand the shift from Medieval to Renaissance culture. Texts to be read include: selections from Vittoria Colonna, Gaspara Stampa, Castigione, and Tasso, St. Francis, Provencal poetry, Sicilian poetry, Sweet New Style, Dante's Vita Nuova and Inferno, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Ficino, Alberti, Pico della Mirandola, Michelangelo. While not essential, a working knowledge of Italian is useful.

361. Intermediate Italian. Italian 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

All the basic skills of the language will receive attention in this course, the primary goal of which is the improvement and refinement of oral, reading and writing proficiency. Review of difficult points of grammar will be taken up when necessary, but the major concentration will be on class discussion of short reading materials ranging from newspaper and magazine articles, short fiction and poetry to polemic essays on contemporary cultural, political and social topics. Short essays will be part of the regular assignments, as will occasional prepared oral presentations, and translations. The variety of the materials covered will be as broad as possible to introduce students to the several different writing styles and manner of presentation of the language. The course will be conducted in Italian and will meet three hours weekly.

468. Studies in Modern Italian Literature. Reading knowledge of Italian. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.
Section 001 The Historical Novel in Italy
This is a course in the development of the historical novel in Italy. We will begin with Manzoni's The Bethroted, the "founding father" of modern Italian narrative. Then we will read Verga's Nastrodon Gesualdo, Lampedusa's The Lepoard, and Morante's History: A Novel, all with an eye toward sociohistorical as well as literary questions. In each case, the concept of history as represented in fictional narrative will be our central concern. Course requirements include two short papers (4-6 pp.), an inclass presentation, and a final exam. Readings will be in English and/or Italian. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. (Lucente)

Courses in Portuguese (Division 452)

101. Elementary Portuguese. (4). (LR).

This course is designed to give students the ability to understand the Portuguese of everyday life when spoken at a moderate speed, to be understood in typical situations of everyday life, and to read non-technical Portuguese of moderate difficulty. Because of the nature of the materials and the nationality and training of the present staff, students will learn the variety of Portuguese spoken in Brazil by educated speakers. Classroom work involves gradual introduction of Portuguese structure through dialogues and communication exercises which stress listening and speaking. Homework consists of studying grammar, memorizing structures and verb forms and writing exercises. Grading will be based on six hourly quizzes (two partial exams), oral exercises, homework, class participation and attendance and a final exam. Portuguese 101 is offered only in the Fall Term.

231. Second-Year Portuguese. Portuguese 102 or equivalent. (4). (LR).

Second year Portuguese is designed to develop and enhance the work done in Portuguese 101/102. (See description above). It aims at perfecting writing and speaking skills, and giving students a deeper understanding of the literature, history, and culture of the Portuguese-speaking world. Classroom work involves an intensive grammar review, the study of finer points of Portuguese grammar as made necessary from daily observation of students' writing and speaking performances, oral presentations and discussion of short stories and texts from newspapers and magazines. Homework involves studying grammar, preparing oral presentations, and writing guided essays. Grading is based on quizzes, oral presentations, essays, class participation and attendance, and a final exam. Portuguese 231 is only offered Fall Term.

350. Independent Study. Portuguese 232 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of six credits.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed must be submitted to the concentration adviser no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Portuguese Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office.) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

450. Independent Study. Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for a total of six credits.

The work to be done should not be the same as that offered in a regular course. A written description of the project together with an appropriate bibliography must be submitted for initial approval to the proposed instructor of the course and then to the concentration adviser for final approval prior to the beginning of the term during which the independent study is to be undertaken.

489. Directed Readings in Portuguese. Permission of department. (2-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Adviser no later than the second week of the semester, for the approval of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee (Proposal forms are available in the Department Office). The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course. Prerequisite: Portuguese 232.

Courses in Romance Linguistics (Division 460)

413/Spanish 413/Educ. D455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics. Permission of concentration adviser. (3). (Excl).

See Spanish 413. (Carbon-Gorell)

450. Independent Study. Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

The work to be done should not be the same as that offered in a regular course. A written description of the project together with an appropriate bibliography must be submitted for initial approval to the proposed instructor of the course and then to the concentration adviser for final approval prior to the beginning of the term during which the independent study is to be undertaken.

456/French 428/Educ. D456. Teaching French/Applications of Linguistics. Permission of concentration adviser. (3). (Excl).

See French 428.

Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school are given a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction. Students who began Spanish at another college or university must also take the placement test.

101. Elementary Spanish. (4). (LR).

Course objectives: the first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task-based approach develops proficiency by integrating grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated. Goals: Students completing Spanish 101 will have heard about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak, using memorized phrases and some original language; read short texts of familiar or simple structure for detailed comprehension, less familiar materials for gist and main ideas; write familiar material with considerable accuracy. Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance is essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, weekly oral and written quizzes, chapter tests and a final exam. Cost:3 WL:4

102. Elementary Spanish, Continued. Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in Spanish 103. (4). (LR).

Course Objectives: Introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task-based approach develops proficiency by integrating grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated. Goals: Students completing Spanish 102 will speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure. Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance is essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, weekly oral and written quizzes, chapter tests and a final exam. Cost:3 WL:4

103. Review of Elementary Spanish. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Accelerated refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. Transfer students would elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere. Course Objectives: Introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task-based approach develops proficiency by integrating grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated. Goals: Students completing Spanish 103 will have heard about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure. Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance is essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, weekly oral and written quizzes, chapter tests and a final exam. Cost:3 WL:4

231. Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 102, or 103, or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Corse Objectives: Introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task-based approach develops proficiency by integrating grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated. Goals: Students completing Spanish 231 will speak in spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compostiions on familiar topics, with good control of sentence structure. Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance is essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, weekly oral and written quizzes, chapter tests and a final exam. Cost:3 WL:4

232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued. Spanish 231 or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Course Objectives: Organized around four themes: Tradition and Change, Cultural Contrasts, Human Rights, and Women and Society to develop cultural awareness and formulate opinions on a variety of contemporary issues through reading, discussion and writing. Grammatical concepts considered within a functional whole; students responsible for home study of individual points. Classroom activities stress communication across the four skills with a strong oral/written component. Video, audio cassette, and computer materials incorporated. Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance is essential. Participation includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Pre- and post-reading activities take place in class; reading activities done at home. Writing samples prepared in class and at home. Grade based on oral presentations, classroom participation, homework assignments, periodic oral and written quizzes, four chapter tests, and a final exam. Cost:2 WL:4

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language.

111. First Special Reading Course. May not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have already received credit for high school or college Spanish. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for students interested mainly in the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language. They are open to graduates, juniors and seniors; and to others by special permission. For graduate students, a grade of B or better in Spanish 112 satisfies the basic reading knowledge requirement for credit by undergraduates who have already received credit for high school or college Spanish.

Other Language Courses

307/Amer. Cult. 307. Spanish for U.S. Latinos. Basic knowledge of Spanish language or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

See American Culture 307. (Aparicio)

358. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators. Spanish 232 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 361 or 362. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 358, 361, and 362 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 358 is a practical Spanish conversation course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

361. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 232 or equivalent. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 358, 361, and 362 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 361 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare translations and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in class discussions or presentations.

362. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 232 or equivalent. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 358, 361, and 362 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 362 is intended to improve student's ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in class discussions or presentations.

411. Advanced Syntax. Spanish 361 and 362. (3). (Excl).

This course will analyze in terms of linguistic function and communication the major morphological and syntactic structures of Spanish. Among the topics to be covered will be the function of inflectional suffixes, the role of derivational suffixes, the meaningful role of word order, the syntactic and semantic role of verbal aspect (preterit vs. imperfect) and verbal mood (indicative vs. subjunctive), the ser/estar distinction, the use of pronouns, and linguistic variety in the Spanish speaking world. There will be a midterm, a final exam, and a required research project. Cost: 1 WL:3,4 (Dworkin)

413/Rom. Ling. 413/Educ. D455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics. Permission of concentration adviser. (3). (Excl).

Goals: to prepare students for a professional career, teaching about current issues in foreign/second language acquisition theory and in teaching methodology, and to give practical classroom techniques regardless of level or genre. Course objectives: (1) gain a knowledge of foreign/second language acquisition theories; (2) understand the principles of proficiency as applied to second-language acquisition; (3) establish curricular models for language programs; (4) become familiar with various methodologies and teaching approaches, and examine them in context of a proficiency orientation; (5) become familiar with task-based classroom techniques designed to develop listening, reading. speaking, and writing skills; (6) become familiar with techniques to incorporate culture into the language classroom; (7) develop error correction strategies; (8) critically examine materials in the context of a proficiency orientation. Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: class participation; journal review; three class observations; two written exams; four-skills portfolio; textbook evaluation review. Cost:3 WL:4 (Carbon-Gorell)

Literature

331/Great Books 331. Great Books of Spain and Latin America. Open to students at all levels. A knowledge of Spanish is not required. May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish (or teaching certificate major or minor). (3). (HU).

This course will be an introduction to the "great books" of twentieth century Latin America. We will read books by authors like Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Carlos Fuentes, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Pablo Neruda, Clarice Lispector, Rigoberta Menchú, Ricardo Piglia, and Cristina Peri Rossi. We will study these in relation (1) to Latin American history during the period, (2) earlier currents in Latin American literature, and (3) corresponding trends in world culture. Evaluation based on class participation, journals, and final paper. (Colás)

372. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU).

The late eighteenth-century and the 1930s mark the two extremes of the period represented in this survey of modern Spanish literature. The course will thus lay a good historical foundation for further Spanish courses and for comparisons to readings from other literatures. Essays, plays, poems and novels are analyzed as individual works for the beginning student, an effort is made to show how the works exemplify their cultural context ranging from the Enlightenment through Romanticism, Realism, Generation of '98 to Symbolism. Representative authors who may be studied are Moratin, Larra, Bécquer, Galdós, Unamuno and Lorca. The class format is basically recitation, but lecture and reports will also be used. Exercises consist of periodic tests, midterm and final paper, and final exam. The course is conducted in Spanish. (Hafter)

373. Topics in Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001 Spanish Metatheater.
All literary texts refer, to a greater or lesser extent, explicitly or implicitly, to other texts; metaliterary texts do this more overtly and self-consciously than others. They emphasize (and often inquire into) their own literariness, in a variety of ways. Metatheatrical texts can depict a playwright composing a play, a director producing a play, the "real" lives and "stage" lives of actors and actresses, the experiences of audience members, or a combination of these features. Perhaps the most characteristic manifestation is of the "play-within-the-play." This course will focus on examples of metatheater drawn from all periods of Peninsular Spanish literature, and will be further illustrated by reference to texts from other literatures and to films. Teaching, conducted entirely in Spanich, will be by lecture and class discussion. Active participation is expected. Evaluation will be by attendance and three medium-length papers. (Anderson)

Section 002 Narrative Designs in 20th-Century Spanish Fiction Narrative, as a mode of thought and as a cultural practice, imposes designs upon human experience. In literature and in life, narrative makes experience in time meaningful, by shaping, ordering, and linking disparate events. Narrative also "has designs" on its participants and its readers instilling in us the desire for coherent explanations and logical conclusions. In this course, as we examine narrative designs, we will also explore the possibilities for creative freedom within (and without) these designs. Primary readings include short stories and novellas from twentieth-century Spain. Major assignments include two exams and two analytic-interpretive papers (5-8 pages each). Evaluation will be based on written assignments, as well as class participation. Discussions will be conducted in Spanish. Cost:2 WL:3 (Highfill)

381. Introduction to Latin American Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU).

This course covers Latin American Literature written from the time of the encounter and conquest (1492), through the Colonial era and up to the early modern period. Representative texts from each of these periods and from all the major genres will be studied. The course will concentrate both on the intrinsic literary qualities and features of the texts and on their relationship with the country and historical moment in which they were produced. Teaching will be conducted entirely in Spanish, in a mixture of lecture and discussion format. Evaluation will be by a mixture of presentations, exams and short-to-medium papers. Active class participation is expected.

382. Introduction to Latin American Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. Spanish 361 recommended. (3). (HU).

This course will cover poetry, drama, and narrative of 20th century Latin America with an emphasis on the relationship between this literature and Latin American societies during the period. Authors covered will include Horacio Quiroga, Gabriela Mistral, Nicolás Guillén, Pablo Neruda, Miguel Angel Asturias, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Emilio Carballido, Cristina Peri Rossi, and Rigoberta Menchú. Evaluation based on class participation, journals, and final paper. (Colás)

388. Spanish and Spanish-American Literatures Today. A 300-level Spanish course or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

This course will explore the cultural production of the Post-Franco period, 1975-1994. We will read and discuss short stories, poetry, and drama. In addition, we will view four films and survey recent issues of cultural magazines. Discussions of these works will focus on problems of identity: on constructions of gender and relations of self and other. Emphasis will also be placed on the basic analysis of cultural texts. Major assignments include three short analytic papers (3-5 pages each), two exams, and an oral report on a contemporary cultural magazine. Evaluation will be based on written assignments as well as class participation. Discussions will be conducted in Spanish. Cost:2 WL:3 (Highfill)

459. Don Quijote. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (HU).
Don Quijote
es la cumbre de la literatura espanola y una de las mas importantes de la literatura universal. En ella estan presentes tanto los problemas e ideales y problemas de la epoca de su autor como los de todos los tiempos. La lectura del Quijote es un ejercicio de la mas alta calidad, reconfortante al mismo tiempo que produce una excepcional emocion estetica. El curso tiene como objeto que el estudiante haga una introduccion a la obra que le permita disfrutar tanto de los mundos ideologios de retorico del Quijote. El estudiante debe leer detenidamente la obra y hacer un trabajo sobre un tema especifico, segun la methodologia que el professor require. (Cása)

464. Spanish Romanticism. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

Spain, for the rest of Europe, was the "romantic" country above all others. Typical of this attitude is the "Carmen" legend which grew out of Prosper Mérimée's novel; it attributed to all Spaniards an exotic culture of violence, bull fighting, passion, and erotic allure. Two lines of inquiry emerge from this situation. One concerns Romanticism in general. How should one understand what so many consider the tendency to gush, to strike melodramatic postures, to exaggerate one's emotional responses? Are the writers of this movement of such petty stature, have they so little to say to us? A second line of inquiry concerns the movement in Spain. Is Larra, for example, to be dismissed as an imitator of the French satirist Jouy? Should Espronceda be put down as an imitator of the English Lord Byron, or Bécquer of the German poet, Heine? What was happening in Spanish life that contributed to the formation of an authentic Spanish Romantic movement? Readings from Cadalso, the Duque de Rivas, and other dramatists and prose writers will help block out answers to these questions. Hour and final examinations, term paper. Conducted in Spanish. (Hafter)

470. Latin-American Literature, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

This course will be concerned with the principal literary figures and the historical and ideological background to the period in question. Among those likely to be studied, are some of the principal chroniclers of the conquest, Ercilla, el Inca Garcilaso, Sor Juan Inés de la Cruz, eighteenth-century novelists, romantic writers and gaucho poets. Teaching will be conducted entirely in Spanish, in a mixture of lecture and discussion format. Evaluation will be by a mixture of oral presentations, exams and papers. Active participation is expected.

475. Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.

This course will address the main characteristics of the Spanish American novel of the 20th-Century. The main objectives will be: (1) to define the contemporary genre, (2) to read at least five representative novels of different historical moments, (3) to study the novels in a close-reading of their fundamental aspects. Literary and political context will be considered in order to solve allusions and allegorical meaning, and measure the novel's social impact. Short assignments on each reading, a midterm paper and a final paper are required. The format of the class will be lecture and discussion. Student active participation is encouraged. Cost:3 (Goic)

485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent or permission of advisor. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

This course is jointly offered with Film and Video Studies 455.001 for Fall Term, 1994. (Hurtado)

488. Topics in Spanish Literature. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.
Section 001 Federico Garcia Larca.
This upper-level literature course will be concerned with a number of representative works by Federico Garcia Lorca (1898-1936), Spain's most famous twentieth-century writer. We shall concentrate on several of the collections of poetry and several of the plays, but not to the exclusion of a variety of lesser-known prose works. The primary approach will be intrinsic, based on close reading, but the works will also be contextualized within the period and we shall consider some of the salient aspects of Lorca's biography. Teaching, conducted entirely in Spanish, will be by a mixture of lecture, class discussion, and a number of informal oral presentations. Evaluation is by attendance, class participation, and several medium-length papers. (Anderson)


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