Courses in Sociology (Division 482)

Primarily for Underclass Students

100. Principles of Sociology. Open to freshpersons and sophomores. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 400. Seniors must elect Soc. 400. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 195 or 400. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).
Section 001.
The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the discipline of sociology the systematic study of human society and social behavior. You will become familiar with many of the topics sociologists study, major theoretical perspectives, and tools of analysis. In this course we'll place particular emphasis on deviance, the family, and patterns of inequality by social class, race-ethnicity, and gender. This course will be especially engaging for those of you interested in important social issues such as poverty, discrimination, changing gender roles, and changes in the family. Central goals of this course include: (1) helping you to learn to see social conditions and social change as consequences of cultural patterns rather than as accidental or random occurrences; and, (2) helping you to gain a clear understanding of the social forces that shape our lives, experiences, and opportunities. WL:1 (Smock)

Section 020. How do class, race, age, gender, and sexual preference shape our and other peoples' lives? Why do people who make $30,000 and people who make $140,000 all feel middle class? Why do women in dual career couples do a month of 24 hour days more housework than men? Why do we need affirmative action? Why do Women Marines have to wear makeup and take etiquette classes? Why can't gays and lesbians get married? Why do we spend almost five times as much of the federal budget on the elderly than on children? In this course we will use sociological imagination, theory, analysis, and empirical research to answer these questions. We will examine various theoretical explanations for social inequality in the United States as well as empirical research about inequality. Students will learn the basic concepts of the discipline and will learn to think and write critically about these issues. (Martin)

102. Contemporary Social Issues: An Introduction to Sociology. Open to freshpersons and sophomores. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 302, 303, 400, 401, 423, 444, 447, 450, 460, or 461. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS). Credit is granted for a combined total of 8 credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.
Section 001 Introduction to Sociology through Organizations and Institutions.
Organizations provide the social settings for the pursuit of personal and collective goals. Whether our objectives be education, religion, profit, entertainment, or social service, some organizational form serves as the basis for achieving these goals, among them schools, churches, businesses, sports team or social service organization. Organizations both empower us with opportunities to achieve our goals and constrain and discipline us to work within the expectations and norms of the institutional settings, norms and values that form their context. This course examines how organizations and institutions have emerged, how they have been transformed over time, and how they shape our understanding of ourselves. Selecting from a variety of institutional settings, like education, science, religion, mass media, entertainment, government, and the economy, this course examines organizational forms and structures that have developed in the Western world such as schools, corporations, and a variety of private and public organizations that have become established in modern societies and have come to shape our daily lives. How these organizations and institutions change and affect us as persons, and how persons, groups and ideas shape and transform them, form the basis for the questions and debates that the course aims to address. How the experiences differ by gender, race, ethnicity, religion and social classes lead to the practical examination of contemporary issues in our societies. The course will examine various theoretical perspectives that help make sense of these institutional developments. These have important effects on the cultural understandings, prescriptions and solutions to the conflicts shaping and transforming contemporary society, including the structures of work, beliefs, sexuality, ideology and knowledge. The course aims to be intellectually challenging, while remaining introductory. (Guilarte)

Section 009 Introduction to Sociology through Social Inequality. Who gets ahead in our society and who falls behind? Is the middle class shrinking? Why are the majority of school teachers, pharmacists, and bank teller women while most lawyers, engineers and repair personnel are men? Does it "pay" to get a college education? This class will address these and related questions by introducing students to the study of social behavior with a focus on social inequality. The course is divided into three parts: an introductory overview of sociological theories of inequality; the application of these perspectives to issues of class, race, and gender; and an investigation of three social institutions the family, education, and work. How do family, schooling, and work experiences help or hinder your chances to "get ahead?" These topics will be examined with a set of focused readings, orienting lectures, and class discussions. Throughout the course, the objective is to understand everyday events and circumstances with social science research and theory. WL:1 (Krecker)

105. First Year Seminar in Sociology. Freshman; sophomores with permission of instructor. (3). (SS).
Section 001 Transforming American Then and Now.
That America is a nation of immigrants is one of the most common yet truest statements. In this course we will survey a vast range of the American Immigrant experience; that of the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexicans. Immigration to America can be broadly understood as consisting of four major waves: the first one, that which consisted of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-19th century; the second one, that which consisted of Southern and East Europeans at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th; the third one, the movement from the South to the North of Black Americans and Mexicans precipitated by two World Wars; and the fourth one, from 1965 on, is still ongoing in the present, of immigrants mostly from Latin America and Asia. At all times, our effort win be to understand the immigrant past of these ethnic groups, both for what it tells us about the past as well as their present and possible future. This course is a First-Year Seminar, limited to 25 entering students at the University. As such, it will be run as a seminar, involving a fair amount of discussion and writing. WL:1 (Pedraza)

195. Principles in Sociology (Honors). Open to freshpersons and sophomores admitted to the Honors Program, or other freshpersons and sophomores with a grade point average of at least 3.2. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 400. No credit for seniors. Credit is not granted for both Sociology 195 and Sociology 100 or 400. (4). (SS).

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the discipline of sociology the systematic study of human society and social behavior. You will become familiar with many of the topics sociologists study, major theoretical perspectives, and tools of analysis. In this course we'll place particular emphasis on deviance, the family, and patterns of inequality by social class, race-ethnicity, and gender. This course will be especially engaging for those of you interested in important social issues such as poverty, discrimination, changing gender roles, and changes in the family. Central goals of this course include: (1) helping you to learn to see social conditions and social change as consequences of cultural patterns rather than as accidental or random occurrences; and, (2) helping you to gain a clear understanding of the social forces that shape our lives, experiences, and opportunities. The format of the class will vary: lecture, discussion, films, small group discussions and exercises are all important parts of the course. WL:1 (Smock)

For Undergraduates Only

210. Elementary Statistics. Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators must elect this course prior to their last term. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Poli.Sci. 280, Stat. 100, 402, 311, or 412, or Econ. 404 or 405. (4). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).
Section 001.
The purpose of the course is to provide literacy in the evaluation of quantitative evidence as it relates to the world of alternative, testable ideas. Students are familiarized with a variety of descriptive statistics (interpretation of tables, measures of association, regression, etc.), inductive statistics (theory of sampling, significance tests) and the empirical origin of statistical data (surveys, censensus, observational studies). Several forms of decision-making based on quantitative and non-quantitative evidence are compared and contrasted. No special background or preparation is needed. Students capable of handling arithmetic have all the mathematical skills required for the course. Problem sets are routinely assigned to illustrate the concepts of the course. Additionally, the course will provide students with an introduction to "statistical packages" easily used on microcomputers. NO PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE WITH THIS TECHNOLOGY IS NECESSARY. This will provide an opportunity to analyze and discuss some real data sets. Course grades are determined by performance on three major exams (including the final) and some quizzes given in the discussion sections. The new format generates four credit hours from two lectures and two hours of discussion per week. (Goldberg)

231. Investigating Social and Demographic Change in America. (4). (SS). (QR/2).

This computer based course is for freshpersons and sophomores ONLY. It will allow participants to investigate how major social, economic, and political changes have affected the demographic structure of the national population in the past four decades. How greatly have Black-White income differences become reduced since the 1960's? To what extent has the traditionally family disintegrated? Do service industries continue to dominate the nation's labor force? Through readings, lectures, and exercises on the Apple Macintosh computer you will learn how to examine such questions using U.S. census data and simple statistical analyses. In the process you will come to understand how major dimensions of the nation's social and demographic structure have changed from 1950 to the present. WL:1 (Frey)

302/Amer. Cult. 302. Introduction to American Society. (3). (Excl).

Plays, films, and novels by American social realists are used to analyze some fundamental values, structures, and social processes underlying American society. Emphasis is on processes of social control, including causes of conformity and deviance, and stratification, including class, gender and ethnic/racial inequalities. Film and literature are used only to study central features of American society. Readings include: R. Ellison, F.S. Fitzgerald, H. James, M. Norman, J. Steinbeck, and J. Welch. Films include: A Thousand Clowns, The Accused, Do The Right Thing, One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest, The Little Foxes, Thelma & Louise. Grades are based on discussion and four short papers. WL:1 (Dreiling)

303/CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations. An introductory course in Sociology or CAAS. (4). (SS). (This course meets the Race and Ethnicity Requirement).
Section 001 Race and Cultural Contacts.
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the social history (past and present) of racial minorities in the United States. We will begin by defining the principal concepts that sociologists use in their analysis of race relations. Central to this discussion will be the understanding of "racism" NOT as "prejudice," "ignorance," an "attitude," or a "set of beliefs" but rather as a comprehensive historical system that changes over time. After this theoretical discussion, we will survey the historical experiences of five racial minorities, namely, African Americans, Chicanos/ Mexican Americans, American Indians, Puerto Ricans, and Asian Americans. The course will conclude with a discussion of possible solutions to the racial dilemmas faced by the U.S. The bulk of your grade will be based on your performance in three in-class exams. The exams are 50% multiple choice and 50% essay. The instructor will lecture two times a week and the students will meet with their TAs once a week to discuss the topics and issues raised in lecture. Cost:3 WL:1 (Bonilla-Silva)

304/Amer. Cult. 304. American Immigration. (3). (SS).

That America is a nation of immigrants is one of the most common place yet truest of statements. In this course we will survey a vast range of the American immigrant experience: that of the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans and Mexicans. Immigration to American can be broadly understood as consisting of four major waves: the first one, that which consisted of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-19th century; the second one, that which consisted of Southern and Eastern Europeans at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th; the third one, the movement from the south to the north of Black Americans and Mexicans precipitated by the two world wars; and the fourth one, from 1965 on, is still ongoing in the present, of immigrants mostly from Latin America and Asia. At all times, our effort is to understand the immigrant past of these ethnic groups, both for what it tells us about the past as well as their present and possible future. Course requirements: the written requirements for this course consist of two exams. Both the exams will be in-class tests, consisting of short-answer questions that will draw from the lectures and our discussion of the readings. Each exam will be worth 50 points. WL:1 (Pedraza)

310. Introduction to Research Methods. One of the following: Soc. 100, 101, 102, 195, 202, 203, 400, or 401; or completion of one social science course in economics, anthropology, political science, psychology or other sociology course; or permission of instructor. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with Soc. 397. (4). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

This course provides experience and training in systematic social research especially, but not only, survey research. There are three lecture-discussion periods a week, plus a weekly two hour laboratory-practicum. Especially through the latter, students and staff will design, carry out, analyze, and report a serious piece of research the main results of which can be made public in some form. (Zhou)

330. Population Problems. (3). (SS).

The course is intended for a wide range of students who might be interested in learning about the world population situation and the range of problems associated with it. There are no prerequisites for the course, nor is any special background required although average ability to read tables and interpret quantitative material will be assumed. The course focuses specifically on social and economic problems associated with population matters. Family planning and other related population programs and policies are discussed. The course is international, dealing both with less developed and more developed countries. Attention is given to population growth, urbanization and migration; population and development; demographic impact of AIDS; age structure, aging and associated problems; and population policy and programs, especially those related to the reduction of birth rates. The course is run as a lecture with in-class discussions encouraged. Films and other audio-visual aids are used. Grades are based largely on in-class exams. Written assignments and class participation are given some additional weight. (Knodel)

331. Population Trends in the United States: Their Economic and Social Consequences. (3). (Excl). (QR/1).

Four basic trends characterize social, economic and demographic and demographic shifts in the United States in the 1980s. First, there was sustained economic growth occurring at a time of industrial restructuring. This means there were many "winners" in the decade, especially those who had specialized skills and recent retirees. There were also "losers," especially younger men with no more than a high school education. Second, on almost all indicators of economic status, women especially those who entered the labor force after 1975 did well vis-a-vis men leading to substantial reductions in gender gaps. Third, thanks to a high rate of immigration from abroad, the racial/ethnic composition of the population changed greatly although the impact of immigration is felt most heavily in specific metropolises. Finally, there was a continuing shift away from traditional families as the age at marriage continued to rise, married women increased their labor force activity, divorce occurred frequently and a steadily increasing fraction of children were born to unmarried women. This course focuses upon contemporary changes in American society. Readings will cover historical developments and present several theoretical perspectives but an important component will be the examination of data from the 1980 and 1990 censuses. This will be done to describe how social and economic changes are occurring and why. Each week one of the class sessions will meet in a classroom equipped with computers so that students may become familiar with the analysis of the data gathered by our government to monitor social change. No prior knowledge of computing or statistics is required. Students interested in current economic trends, social change, shifts over time in the status of women or minorities, immigration and those interested in marketing issues will be particularly interested in the content of this course and its assignments. (Farley)

389. Practicum in Sociology. Permission of instructor. Up to 4 credits may be included in a concentration plan in Sociology. A combined total of 8 credits of Sociology 389 and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee ($23) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.

Sociology 389 is known as "Project Community" and "Trained Volunteer Corps." Students combine 4 to 6 hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning and problem-solving. Over 50 sections offer settings that include working in school classrooms with "at-risk" children and youth in a variety of tutoring, chemical dependency, mentoring situations; in the adult and juvenile criminal justice system; with adult literacy; with the homeless; and with elderly, the mentally ill, the disabled, and in hospitals. For more information, come to the Office of Community Service Learning, in the Michigan Union, Room 2205. Cost:1 WL:5; enrollment is by override only; visit Project Community Office, 2205 Michigan Union. (Chesler, Kritt)

392/REES 395/Hist. 332/Pol. Sci. 395/Slavic 395. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States. (4). (SS).

See REES 395.

For Undergraduates and Graduates

401. Contemporary Social Issues III. (2-4). (Excl). Credit is granted for a combined total of 8 credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.
Section 001 Class, Race and Gender in American Society and Culture.
Studies of American society and culture intersect around issues of class, race and gender. Using a sociological perspective, this upper level course will study American society in a variety of contexts, using the lenses of class, race and gender to tell us more about the culture in which we live. Students are expected to develop their capacities for critical thinking while preparing for class with weekly readings. Student progress may be measured by written papers, testing and fieldwork projects. WL:1 (Murphy)

405. Theory in Sociology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 305. (3). (Excl).

"Sociological Theory," focuses on the systematic study of society through theory. The first part of the course centers on the emergence of sociological theory; it traces the origins of the concept of society and emphasizes the effect of the Enlightenment which built the foundations for the discipline of sociology. It covers the works of the social thinkers who laid out the structure of the discipline Karl Marx, Max Hebrew and Emile Durkheim and of those who have made contemporary contributions, such as Jurgen Habermas and Anthony Giddens. In light of the theoretical perspectives offered by these social thinkers, the second part centers on components of society such as culture, sex roles and social groups, organizations and bureaucracy, stratification and inequality, and race and ethnicity. (Birtek)

412. Ethnic Identity and Intergroup Relations. Permission of instructor. Students are required to have taken courses in ethnic studies or intergroup relations. (3). (Excl).

This course will explore a wide range of questions on ethnic identity and intergroup relations. It will consider frameworks for community building, taking into account issues of conflict and competing social interests. It will explore the degree to which America's democratic principles continue to bind local and national communities that are increasingly diverse and will examine what a rethinking of the social contract might mean. Students will be encouraged to bring personal experience and perspective to enrich the discussion of theoretical readings. Active participation, a research paper and a second written assignment, and an exam will be required. WL:1 (Schoem)

420. Complex Organizations. One of the following: Soc. 100, 101, 102, 195, 202, 203, 400, or 401; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course provides an introduction to contemporary organization theory and research. The main themes of course are organized along two dimensions. The first considers the choice between internal hierarchy versus negotiating, contracting and bargaining externally with other organizations. The second dimension focuses on the dynamics of competition, conflict and cooperation within and between organizations. The first part of the course provides a survey of early perspectives on organization including theories of bureaucracy, oligarchies, scientific management, and human relations management. The second part of the course examines some of the contemporary perspectives and debates between sociologists and economists of organizations. These include theoretical perspectives like population ecology, institutional theory, resource dependence, principal-agency theory, transaction costs theories, and representative research examples associated with them. Examples will be drawn from a variety of institutional settings. Students will use case studies and research accounts to examine and contrast the logic and assumptions of different organizational theories. The course will conclude with special topics on cooperative organizational forms among organizational competitors with various network configurations and dynamics. These cooperative forms include organizational alliances, joint ventures, partnerships, federations, conglomerates, multinationals, consortia, cartels, syndicates, trade association, trade unions, and others. WL:1 (Guilarte)

423/Am. Cult. 421. Social Stratification. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender Inequality.
Why do some people get ahead while others do not? What are the effects of education, class background, race, and gender on one's occupational prestige? Why do some people make more money than others, even those with the same education and skills? Social inequality is a ubiquitous feature of modern societies and the study of social inequality is a central concern of sociology. This course deals with the sources and consequences of social inequality. We begin with a consideration of the models of social class proposed by Marx and Weber. We then examine the major form of stratification research in contemporary American sociology: the status-attainment approach. Following a critical evaluation of this work, we discuss recent alternatives to it, including network analysis and the new theories of class, race, and gender inequality. The focus will be on the United States, but references to other countries will be made where appropriate. WL:1 (Mizruchi)

426/Pol. Sci. 428/Asian Studies 428/Phil. 428. China's Evolution Under Communism. Upperclass standing or permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

See Political Science 428. (Lieberthal)

435. Urban Inequality and Conflict. Credit is granted for only one course from Soc. 335, 435, or 535. Does not meet sociology doctoral requirements. (3). (Excl).

This course examines the examines the economic, political and cultural factors that generate and reinforce inequality across the landscapes of American metropolitan areas. The course opens with a historical overview of the primary economic and political factors that shaped the construction of the built and social environments of the American city. It then turns to an examination of the those contemporary forces most critical to understanding current geographic patterns of metropolitan growth, both within and across urban areas. The course also reviews the cultural milieus of both inner-city and suburban areas, and considers how those cultural understandings buttress exclusion and misunderstanding. Finally, the course considers particular foci of tension within the city, such as the police and inter-ethnic relations. (Herbert)

444. The American Family. One of the following: Soc. 100, 101, 102, 195, 202, 203, 400, or 401; or permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

This course provides a sociological overview of U.S. family patterns. The first half of the course adopts an historical perspective, while the second half examines specific issues and controversies pertaining to contemporary family structures and change. Sociology 444 is primarily a lecture class, with some films and class discussions. Student performance will be assessed by means of two exams (midterm and non-cumulative final), and two short papers. For the final paper, each student will choose one aspect of family life (such as child-rearing, divorce, gender relations, etc.) and interview different members in various generations of an American family/kin network, in order to identify the continuities and to assess how their experiences mesh with the materials and explanations presented in the course. WL:1 (Starrells)

447/WS 447. Gender Roles and Status. (3). (SS).

This course focuses on social inequalities which are based on gender specific social roles. While the topics and readings focus on issues which are specific to gender inequality, they are representative of more general substantive areas in the field of sociology, e.g., power, conflict, and stratification. Topics include: inequalities in interpersonal behavior, the family and work organization, socialization and educational attainment; dynamics of occupational sex segregation; and implications of inequality for family violence, sexual harassment, and rape. Grades are based on midterms and research paper. WL:1 (Palmer)

450. Political Sociology. (3). (SS).

In this lecture/seminar course, students will learn how to interpret the conflicts presumed "ethnic" (i.e., ethnonationalist, race, tribal, religious, or regionalist) with a historical sociological perspective emphasizing mass mobilization and revolution, the role of the state, and the world-system. Aside from the midterm in-class exam, students will be required to write a seminar paper analyzing such an ethnically based movement or conflict from any region of the world, although in the seminar, six examples will be emphasized: Somalia and Rwanda in Africa, Romania and former Yugoslavia in Eastern Europe, Nagorno-Karabakh and Chechnya in the Caucasus of the Former Soviet Union. (Derluguian)

454. Law and Social Organization. (3). (SS).

This course is designed to examine the organization of law in society and the relationships between law and society. The approach will be primarily from a sociological perspective; however, the views of anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, jurists, and others will also be explored. While the course will be a survey of "law and society" in general, topics of current interest will serve to bring focus to the material: free speech, the death penalty, rape laws, affirmative action and anti- discrimination laws, etc. Various rules and regulations of the University "society" also will be examined in the context of the concepts being studied. Students will be expected to think critically and independently about legal systems and the role of law in society. Evaluation will be based on one or two midterm examinations, a final examination, and two or three short papers. WL:4 (Sharphorn)

460. Social Change. (3). (Excl).

"Social Change" focuses on how change in society can be systematically studied. The course starts with a discussion of the concept of social change the exploration of various attempts to study social change ensues. The study of the works of Karl Marx, Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim lead to the analysis of change within four theoretical approaches, conflict, functionalist, symbolic interactionist, and critical. This introduction to social change is followed by a study of the various dimensions of change. The course will conclude with a survey of distopias (such as 1984, Looking Backwards, Handmaid's Tale ) to depict possible trajectories of change. The requirements include one midterm, one class presentation (on the final paper), and one final paper. WL:1 (Goçek)

463/Comm. 463. Mass Communication and Public Opinion. (3). (SS).

In this course we will examine public opinion polling in the United States with particular emphasis on the development over the last fifty years of commercial polling organizations; the role of the media in reporting and interpreting poll results; the effect surveys have had upon the conduct of politics and the enactment of public policies; the problems of predicting the outcomes of elections; and the differences in methods employed by commercial and academic survey organizations. WL:1 (Steeh)

465/Psych. 488. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior. (3). (SS).

An advanced undergraduate-level course that explores the processes by which people become or are designated deviant. The first part of the course examines objectivist approaches to deviance which seek to explain why certain individuals behave in ways that are considered deviant. The second part of the course focuses on subjectivist approaches to deviance. These traditions analyze the process by which certain behaviors are defined as deviant and examine the consequences of these designations. The conditions under which groups successfully resist stigmatization will also be explored. Evaluation will be based on a midterm, final and 10-12 page paper. (Beckett)

467. Juvenile Delinquency. (3). (Excl).

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to juvenile delinquency in the United States. After a brief historical review of the development of delinquency as a social problem, the course considers a variety of theoretical perspectives that attempt to explain why delinquency occurs. Attention then turns to some groups typically considered delinquent, such as youth gangs and taggers. The course concludes with a consideration of how delinquents are processed through the legal system, and the various alternatives for prevention and treatment. (Herbert)

468. Criminology. (3). (SS).

This course is an introduction to the field of criminology from a sociological perspective, and is primarily focused crime and crime control in the contemporary United States. Our main emphasis will be on the relationship between social factors (such as the distribution of power, race, class, and gender) and crime/crime control. The course begins by considering the way in which media images of crime may differ from the picture generated by the available data sources regarding crime. Next, we will examine theories of crime and consider their applicability to different types of crime (such as street and drug-related crime, family violence, and white collar crime). In the remainder of the seminar we will evaluate the current approach to crime control and discuss possible alternatives. (Beckett)

477/Social Work 609. Sociology of Aging. (3). (Excl).

This course examines the major constructs, theories, and issues in social gerontology today within the context of the aging of our society. The most current debates and empirical findings in regard to such topics as: theories of aging and psychosocial influences on the health and functioning of the aging will be considered; as will variations in aging and the effects of the aging society due to gender, race, and ethnicity. Cost:2 WL:1 (Gibson)

For Sociology Honors Students, Seniors, and Graduates

513/Poli. Sci. 513. Detroit Area Study. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Sociology 513 completes the sequence of courses that constitutes the Detroit Area Study. The emphasis of Sociology 513 is on the multivariate statistical analysis of the survey data collected during Sociology 512. Each student will be expected to complete a substantial research paper. The topic of this paper will be related to the overall subject of the 1995 survey: Racial/Ethnic Inequalities in Health: Stress, Racism and Health Protective Resources. We will discuss the various steps in this overall process, including data coding; the formulation of specific research objectives; the translation of those research objectives into hypotheses that can be tested; the designation of indicators for the relevant concepts, and the selection of appropriate statistical procedures; the implementation of the data analysis; and writing the paper. Prerequisites are participation in Sociology 512 and coursework in statistics. (Williams)

522. Qualitative Research Methods. Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This is the first term of a two-term introduction to qualitative research methods. The focus in this term is the use of a variety of methods of gathering qualitative data interviews, participant observations, life histories, etc. Questions of research epistemology and design, ethics and tactics of researcher-field relationships, and procedures for recording and filing data will be considered. The course is a practicum, and each student will be required to work with another student to undertake an original research project. There will be weekly writing and data-gathering assignments, as well as a final product. Cost:2 WL:3 (Chesler)

530. Introduction to Population Studies. One of the following: Soc. 100, 101, 102, 195, 202, 203, 400, or 401; and permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Soc. 430. (4). (Excl).

This course is a basic introduction to the field of demography. The basic demographic processes which determined population change - fertility, mortality and migration are each treated as to their measurement, history, and present status. There is special consideration of the demographic transition from high to low birth rates and death rates. The processes determining fertility levels are analyzed separately for less and more developed countries. The pattern of migration is studied with special reference to the United States. Finally, there is a consideration of the age-sex structures resulting from various combinations of demographic processes and how they affect projections of the U.S. and the world. Cost:1 WL:4 (Knodel)

541. Contemporary Japanese Society: Convergence Theory. One of the following: Soc. 100, 101, 102, 195, 202, 203, 400, or 401; or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course examines the major social institutions of postwar Japan. In the fifty years since the end of World War II, Japanese society has experienced rapid economic development and social transformation. The main purposes of this course are to identify the persistence and change in the Japanese social structure during this period and to understand their causes and consequences. Implicit comparison to equivalent social institutions in the United States and Western Europe is assumed. Possible topics include marriage and family, socialization and education, neighborhood community, industrial organization, work and occupation, social stratification and mobility, social welfare, minorities, gender roles, and consequences of internationalization. The course will be conducted as a seminar. Grading will be based on a combination of short written assignments, oral presentations, a term paper, and participation in the weekly seminar meetings. WL:3 (Takata)

590. Proseminar in Social Psychology. Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Some background in social psychology is desirable. (3). (Excl).

This course is intended as a graduate-level introduction to social psychology from a sociological perspective. The course attempts to provide an orientation to the historical development of the field and its current state. As such, it must cover a wide range of material, at some cost in terms of depth of coverage. Greater depth in a variety of specific areas is available in the various Sociology 591 seminars and in courses in the Psychology Department. This course provides at least a brief introduction to all of the topics presented covered in those seminars. Cost:4 WL:3 (Modigliani)

591. Special Areas of Social Psychology. Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Some background in social psychology is desirable. (3). (Excl).
Section 001 Social, Family, and Personal Relationships.
The course is designed to provide a general overview to theory and research on social, family, and personal relationships. We will examine current theory and research in the area and students will gain knowledge of the social psychology of relationships. The history, present stature, and future directions of this area of study also will be discussed. A theme that will pervade the course as a whole is the interdisciplinary nature of the research in this area. Seminar format. Graduate students in any department are welcome. (Orbuch)

597. Special Course. Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Some background in social psychology is desirable. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
Section 002 Total Survey Error. Prerequisite: Sociology 612, Methods of Survey Sampling, or permission of instructor.
This course reviews the total error structure of sample survey data, reviewing current research findings on the magnitude of different error sources, design features that affect their magnitudes, and interrelationships among the errors. Coverage, nonresponse, sampling, measurement, and postsurvey processing errors are treated. For each error source reviewed, social science theories about its causes are first presented. Next statistical models estimating the error source are described. Whenever possible empirical studies from the survey methodological literature are reviewed in order to illustrate the relative magnitudes of error in different designs. Emphasis will be placed on aspects of the survey design necessary to estimate different error sources. Relationships among the different error sources will be presented. Students in the class will identify one research project, preferably one connected to their current work, that offers an opportunity for empirical investigations of one or more error sources. An analysis paper presenting the findings of the project will be submitted at the end of the course. (Groves)

Section 003 Data Collection Methods in Survey Research. This course will review alternative data collection methods used in surveys. It concentrates on the impact these techniques have on the quality of survey data, including measurement error properties, levels of nonresponse and coverage error. The course reviews the literature on major mode comparisons, and examines alternative collection methods. Special attention is paid to the statistical and social science literatures on interviewer effects and nonresponse. Current advances in computer assistance in data collection will also be reviewed. The course will present research work which attempts to understand the effect of data collection decisions on survey errors. This is not a "how-to-do-it" course on data collection, but instead presents material that reviews effects of survey design decisions on data quality. It is designed to sensitize students to alternative design decisions and their impact on the data obtained from surveys. Formal lectures will be given in the first part of each class period. The last 20-30 minutes of each class will be devoted to a discussion of the readings assigned for that topic. This course will be taught using compressed video technology, allowing two-way interaction between College Park, Maryland and Ann Arbor. Although the instructor is based in College Park, a number of classes will be taught from Ann Arbor. WL:3 (Couper)

Section 004 Analysis of Complex Sample Data. Prerequisite: Sociology 612, Methods of Survey Sampling, or permission of instructor. This is an introductory course on the analysis of data from complex sample designs covering: the development and handling of selection and other compensatory weights; methods for handling missing data; the effect of stratification and clustering on estimation and inference; alternative variance estimation procedures; methods for incorporating weights; stratification, clustering, and imputed values in estimation and inference procedures for complex sample survey data; and generalized design effects and variance functions. The course utilizes exercises on real survey data to illustrate the methods addressed in class. Students will learn the use of computer software that takes account of complex sample design in estimation. (Rogers)


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