Asian Languages and Cultures

Note: The Department Waitlist policy for all courses is 1 - Get on the Waitlist through Touch-Tone Registration, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.


Courses in Asian Studies (Division 323)

111/UC 172/Hist. 151. South Asian Civilization. (4). (HU).

See History 151. (Trautmann)

121/Hist. 121. Great Traditions of East Asia. (4). (HU).

See History 121. (Forage)

230/Buddhist Studies 230/Phil. 230/Rel. 230. Introduction to Buddhism. (4). (HU).

See Buddhist Studies 230. (Young)

428/Pol. Sci. 428/Phil. 428/Soc. 426. China's Evolution Under Communism. Upperclass standing or permission of instructor. Not recommended for Asian Studies concentrators. (4). (Excl).

See Political Science 428. (Lieberthal)

476/RC Hums. 476/Chinese 476. Writer and Society in Modern China. No knowledge of Chinese is required. (4). (HU).

See Chinese 476. (Feuerwerker)

491. Topics in Japanese Studies. (1). (Excl).
Section 001 Outcastes and Boundaries: Social History of Premodern Japan.
For Fall Term, 1996, this course is offered jointly with History 590.001. (Amino)

499. Independent Study-Directed Readings. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 8 credits.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.


Courses in Buddhist Studies (Division 332)

230/Asian Studies 230/Phil. 230/Rel. 230. Introduction to Buddhism. (4). (HU).

An introduction to the Buddhist religion, with attention to its moral and philosophical teachings, its modes of practice (e.g., meditation, ritual), and its social and institutional contexts. The course takes a historical approach, concentrating on the traditions that developed in India, and the transformations of those traditions in Tibet and East Asia. Students attend three hours of lecture and a one-hour discussion section each week. No previous knowledge of the subject is required. (Young)


Courses in Chinese (Division 339)

Language Courses

101. Beginning Chinese. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Chinese 101 is an introductory course in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Chinese. The student is expected to achieve control of the sound system, basic sentence patterns, and basic vocabulary of Standard Mandarin Chinese. Starting the 5th week, we will learn to read and write the characters. In Chinese 101, the major emphasis is on speaking and aural comprehension. In Chinese 102, we do longer readings and question-answer sheets twice a week. Students are also required to memorize short dialogues. Toward the end of the term students have to write a skit together with other students and their performance will be video-taped and their pronunciation will be graded. We have a test or quiz each week on Thursdays. In general the workload in Chinese 102 is much heavier than in Chinese 101. For both courses, we recommend that students listen to tapes one hour per day. This is a five-credit course. We meet one hour each day. Tuesdays and Thursdays are lectures; Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays are recitations. Students are required to register for both a lecture section and a recitation section. Attendance is taken everyday and no audits are allowed. Textbooks: (a) John DeFrancis, Beginning Chinese (Yale Univ. Press) (b) John DeFrancis, Beginning Chinese Reader, Part I and II (Yale Univ. Press). Materials covered: Beginning Chinese, Lessons 1-13. Beginning Chinese Reader, Lessons 1-12. (Tao)

201. Second-Year Chinese. Chinese 102 or equivalent. (5). (LR).

This course is a continuation of work begun in Chinese 101-102. Students electing the course should have mastered the spoken language material presented in DeFrancis' Beginning Chinese or a similar introductory text and should be able to recognize and write about 400 characters and 1200 combinations. The primary goal of the course is achievement of a basic level of reading competence within a vocabulary of 900 characters and accompanying combinations. A closely integrated secondary goal is continued improvement of aural understanding and speaking competence. These goals are approached through classroom drill, out-of-class exercises, and work in the language laboratory. Daily class attendance is required. Students are graded on the basis of daily classroom attendance, and weekly quizzes or tests. The texts are Intermediate Reader of Modern Chinese (Princeton University Press, 1992) and the movie script The Great Wall. Students who are native or near-native Mandarin Chinese speakers are not eligible for this course. They should enroll in Chinese 302 which covers all of the material presented in Chinese 201/202 and is offered in the Winter Term. No visitors are allowed. (Baxter)

225. Calligraphy. Chinese 101 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

To explore the richness of Chinese calligraphy, this class is designed to include a series of fundamental introductions to the history of Chinese calligraphy and a brief theoretical framework for evaluation and appreciation; in addition, a practice session will be held in each class to facilitate a hands-on learning process. (Shyu)

301. Reading and Writing Chinese. Permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Chinese 101, 102, or 361. (4). (LR).

This course is designed for students with native or near-native speaking ability in Chinese, but little or no reading and writing ability. Chinese 301 meets four hours per week; it focuses on reading and writing Chinese and will cover the regular 101-102 reading materials. Students will be graded on the basis of daily classroom performance, daily quizzes, periodic tests, and homework assignments. The basic text is Beginning Chinese Reader by John DeFrancis.

378. Advanced Spoken Chinese. Chinese 202 or 362. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of four credits.

This course is designed as a spoken language supplement to the post-second year Chinese reading courses. The purpose of Chinese 378 is to continue building on the foundation of spoken competence laid down in first- and second-year Chinese by providing two hours a week for students to talk, talk, and talk. This is accomplished through presentation of brief speeches and discussions on topics selected by the class. The role of the instructor, who serves as a coordinator for the class, is not to teach students how to speak Chinese, but to encourage and coach them in speaking Chinese. Vocabulary lists will be provided before and after each discussion session. The grade will be determined by students' attendance, participation in discussion, oral presentations, and vocabulary quizzes. This course is not for native speakers, auditors, or sit-ins. (Liang)

391. Honors Course in Chinese. Permission of the department. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Directed readings aimed at the writing of analytical papers and/or the Honors thesis.

393. Honors Course in Chinese. Permission of the department. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Directed readings aimed at the writing of analytical papers and/or the Honors thesis.

399. Directed Readings. Permission of the Department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

Individual work and directed readings for undergraduate concentrators. Must be arranged with an instructor.

405. Third-Year Chinese. Chinese 202 or 362. (5). (Excl).

Chinese 405 and 406 comprise a two-term sequence that makes up the third year of study in the Chinese program. All four basic skills reading, writing, listening, and speaking are stressed. In Chinese 405, along with structured grammatical patterns, students primarily learn the strategies and skills required for reading Chinese newspapers. The textbook in 405 is A Chinese Text for a Changing China. In Chinese 406, students learn to read various styles and genres of modern Chinese, including fiction, essays, and occasionally poetry. Course readings are selected from a large variety of genuine Chinese materials; there is no textbook. On completing third-year Chinese, students should (with the aid of a dictionary) be able to read and discuss most non-technical subjects in modern Chinese. Both 405 and 406 meet five hours per week. Of these, three hours are devoted to understanding and discussing the reading material. The fourth hour is reserved for oral presentations, discussions, and skits. The fifth hour is used for taking quizzes or tests. Student work is evaluated on the basis of daily attendance, exercises, one dictation every second day, and one quiz or test per week. The class is conducted mainly in Chinese. Cost:2 WL:1 (Liang)

461. Readings in Modern Chinese. Chinese 406 or equivalent. (5). (Excl).

Chinese 461-462 is a two-term Chinese language course sequence with graded readings at an advanced level. Texts chosen from a variety of sources in both Mainland China and Taiwan include 20th century fiction and essays on various topics. While students are helped to further improve command of structure and vocabulary in a range of language styles, the primary emphasis of the sequence is on reading comprehension with the aim of enabling students to read original materials with less reliance on a dictionary. Development of speaking and writing skills will also be stressed through discussions on the readings. In the second term, longer texts will be used and efforts will be made to improve reading skills and speed. Weekly assignments such as, but not limited to, composition in Chinese and translation into English are required. Classes are conducted largely in Chinese. (Chen)

Literature Courses/Culture Courses

250. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture. No knowledge of Chinese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.
Section 001 Topics in Chinese Civilizations: Gender, Sexuality, and Identity Women in Chinese Literature.
The representation and construction of women in China's long history has undergone many dynamic changes. Through examples of literature past to present we will examine women's place in the male-dominated Confucian system, the femme fatale in the master historical narrative, conventions of female impersonation, women as projections of male desire: erotic objects or the cause of transgression against moral order. We will consider women's strategies of accommodation and resistance and the ways they have sought to express themselves within the system's constraints. In the 20th century women are first "discovered" to have been prime victims of oppression as writers advocate social reform, then appropriated as "liberated" subjects by the communist revolution. Meanwhile women writers have been searching for their own voice; their struggle for subjectivity and identity posing powerful challenges to the Maoist hegemonic discourse. We will also explore how issues of gender and sexuality intersect with cultural identity in works by Chinese-American woman writers. Readings will include traditional and modern poetry and fiction, selections from the great 18th century novel Dream of the Red Chamber, fiction by Lu Hsun, Pa Chin, Ding Ling, Maxine Hong Kingston (The Woman Warrior), Amy Tan (The Joy Luck Club), and others. Toward the end of the course we will look at representations of women in Chinese films: Raise the Red Lantern, Army Nurse, Yellow Earth. Requirements: frequent brief written responses, four papers. No prerequisites. (Feuerwerker)

451. Literary Chinese. Chinese 202 or 362. (4). (Excl).

This is a course primarily for specialists, requiring knowledge of Modern Chinese at least through the Second-Year level. Through the use of Shadick's A First Course in Literary Chinese and selected handouts, the styles of written Chinese of imperial China from prose to poetry are selectively introduced. Class is taught in small recitation groups requiring constant preparation by the student. Quizzes, tests, and hand-in exercises on a weekly basis, plus a final exam, are used to measure progress. Emphasis is on understanding of the texts, as well as the ability to render them clearly into English. This course is the first half of a two-term sequence that is prerequisite to more advanced Chinese courses. In the second term, we continue to read in a variety of texts covering all premodern periods. Further practice is aimed at improving understanding of the structure of literary Chinese, introducing the practice of using dictionaries and other aids for interpretation, and increasing familiarity with important grammatical particles. Supplementary areas of concern include policies and problems in using literary Chinese in research, problems of translation, and the general evolution of styles in the literary tradition. (Forage)

468/Phil. 468. Classical Chinese Thought (To A.D. 220). Upperclass standing; no knowledge of Chinese required. (3). (HU).

This course focuses on the major philosophical schools of the Chou-Han period; this period was roughly equivalent in time and intellectual fertility to the classical ages of Greece and Rome. Among these schools, special consideration is given to the Confucian and Taoist schools, since the doctrines associated with these were the sources of the two major philosophical traditions in China for the next 2000 years and affected very significant cultural developments in the arts, religion, science, and politics. The course concentrates on Chinese ethics and political philosophies (with notable exceptions in the case of certain Taoist thinkers) and on the theories of human nature that were associated with them. Among the more interesting political theories discussed are those pertaining to social control or the most desirable and effective ways of mobilizing the population for goals determined by the rulers. Chinese philosophers have been somewhat unusual in occupying political office and in having an opportunity to test their ideas in practice. This fact has affected the character of Chinese philosophy from the beginning, and it makes the study of Chinese political philosophy especially intriguing. There is some background consideration of the social and living conditions of the periods in which the various philosophies emerged. No knowledge of Chinese is required. Readings are in translation. All students are required to prepare a critical review essay of a secondary-source book dealing with one or more of the schools studied. Other course requirements include a midterm and a final examination.

471. Classical Chinese Literature in Translation. No knowledge of Chinese required. (3). (HU).

Largely through lectures, this course will examine the highlights of early Chinese literature from antiquity to the 13th century. We will begin with The Book of Changes, The Book of Songs, and a few ancient philosophical texts (which are written in brilliant literary styles) from the millennium before Christ, the millennium in which China made an astonishing "philosophical breakthrough" in its civilization. We will then undertake to follow the development of the various forms of poetry, fiction, and other kinds of prose during the subsequent centuries. The principal aim is to enable students to become familiar with, and also to be able to enjoy, these masterpieces of literature that illustrate the range and depth of the Chinese imagination, the inner life of the individual as well as the outer social and political life of China through the ages. Three 5- page papers and a final exam are required. Sample readings include Cyril Birech, ed., Anthology of Chinese Literature, Vol. I; two major texts in Taoist mysticism: Lao Tzu: Tao Te Ching and the "Inner Chapters" of the Chuang Tzu; Burton Watson, The Columbia Book of Chinese Poetry; and other materials in a course pack. (Lin)

476/RC Hums. 476/Asian Studies 476. Writer and Society in Modern China. No knowledge of Chinese is required. (4). (HU).

This is an invitation to study examples of twentieth-century Chinese literature, a literature produced during a period of great historical upheaval and itself a battleground for political, cultural, and aesthetic issues. But we also want to understand and appreciate the artistry and diversity of these literary works. We will examine: external "reality" as projected by our texts; ideological pressures of a shifting political context; the influx of Western influences and the breakdown of tradition; changing views of gender and sexuality; the role and self-conception of the writer as avant-garde rebel, historical witness, social critic, or political martyr, particularly in confronting the oppressed "other" as woman or peasant. What is the purpose or meaning of writing? Given the often fatal risks involved, why write? Readings will include stories by Lu Xun, Family (Ba Jin), Rickshaw (Lao She), "Miss Sophie's Diary" (Ding Ling), etc., examples of Communist "revolutionary literature," and some stories from Taiwan. The second half of the term will deal with post-Mao works, as writers "rethink" themselves and the Communist revolution, search for cultural roots, explore issues of sexuality and subjectivity, and experiment with new techniques. We will read fiction by Mo Yan, Wang Anyi, etc., and look at parallel developments in the "new cinema" through such films as Yellow Earth, Red Sorghum, etc. Class format: lecture/discussion. Requirements: three short papers, a final exam. (Feuerwerker)


Courses in Japanese (Division 401)

Language Courses

101. Beginning Japanese. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($7) required.

A thorough grounding is given in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The aim of the oral component is to provide the student with the speaking and comprehension skills necessary to function effectively in practical situations in a Japanese-speaking environment. Attention is given to the social and cultural differences in the use of the language. In the reading and writing component the two Kana syllabaries ( Katakana and Hiragana ) and elementary characters ( Kanji ) are introduced. The goal of this component is to develop proficient reading skills through practice reinforced by oral and written short question-answer exercises. Students are required to practice with audio/video-tapes a minimum of two hours for each class hour (10 hours per week). From the first day, recitation sessions are conducted entirely in Japanese; no English is permitted. Recitation sessions emphasize speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speed with near-native pronunciation, accent, intonation, rhythm and appropriate body language. Analyses, explanations, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures with a linguist. Texts: Eleanor Harz Jorden and Mari Noda, Japanese: The Spoken Language, Parts I-II; Eleanor Harz Jorden and Hamako Ito Chaplin, Reading Japanese. (Johnson)

201. Second-Year Japanese. Japanese 102 or equivalent. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($9) required.

Further training is given in all the language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for students who have acquired a basic language proficiency. The aim of the oral component is to provide the student with the speaking and comprehension skills necessary to function effectively in more advanced practical situations in a Japanese-speaking environment. In the reading and writing component, the emphasis is on reading elementary texts, developing an expository style, and writing short answers/essays in response to questions about these texts. Approximately 400 of the essential characters are covered. Discussions on the social and cultural use of language are provided. Students are required to attend five hours of class per week: two hours of lecture and three hours of recitation. Students are also required to practice a minimum of two hours for each class hour (12 hours per week). Recitation sessions are conducted entirely in Japanese; no English is permitted. Recitation sessions emphasize speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speed with near-native pronunciation, accent, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. Analyses, explanations, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures with a linguist. Texts: Eleanor Harz Jorden and Mari Noda, Japanese: The Spoken Language, Parts II-III; Eleanor Harz Jorden and Hamako Ito Chaplin, Reading Japanese.

225(250). Calligraphy. Japanese 101 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

In this course students will learn the art of Japanese Calligraphy. The goals of the course are to help you learn how to practice Japanese calligraphy and cultivate your mind through the practice. In this course, we will practice six subjects, including Kanji and Hiragana. We will focus on basic skills such as the way of using brushes, how to keep characters' balance, and so forth. In order to master the basic skills, we will practice a character Ei as a warm up each session. Throughout the course, we will work on cultivating our minds by writing characters in peace and quiet. We will also concentrate on keeping right posture and behavior, for our bodies are closely connected to our minds.

391. Honors Course in Japanese. Permission of the department. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Directed readings aimed at the writing of analytical papers and/or the Honors thesis.

393. Honors Course in Japanese. Permission of the department. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Directed readings aimed at the writing of analytical papers and/or the Honors thesis.

399. Directed Reading. Permission of the department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

Individual work and directed readings for undergraduate concentrators. Must be arranged with an instructor.

405. Third-Year Japanese. Japanese 202 or equivalent. (5). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($9) required.

Advanced training is given in all the language skills. Practice in the use of spoken Japanese is contextualized within simulated Japanese social settings. A variety of selected modern texts (essays, fiction, and newspapers) are read with emphasis on expository style. The goal is to produce self-sufficient readers who can read and discuss most texts with the aid of a dictionary. Students are required to practice with audio/visual tapes a minimum of two hours for each class hour (10 hours per week). Recitation sessions emphasize speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speed with near-native pronunciation, accent, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. Analyses, explanations, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures with a native English speaker. Texts: Eleanor Harz Jorden and Mari Noda, Japanese: The Spoken Language, Part III; Eleanor Harz Jorden and Hamako Ito Chaplin, Reading Japanese; selected reading materials for Third-Year Japanese.

416. Communicative Competence for Japan Oriented Careers. Japanese 406, 411 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course stresses the effective use of the Japanese spoken language in contexts likely to be encountered by a career-oriented professional in Japan. Topics include: Organization, Business Travel, Meetings, Bureaucracy, Distribution, Expansion, Annual Reports, Business Ritual and Socializing. In addition, the course will include practice in rapid reading and transcription/dictation of moderately difficult texts, newspaper articles, and news broadcasts. Students are expected to practice with audio tapes for a minimum of two hours for each class hour.

445. Readings in Technical Japanese. Japanese 406, 421, 411, or permission of instructor. A maximum of 10 credits may be elected through Japanese 421, 445, and 446. (4). (Excl).

Japanese 445-446, a two term sequence of Readings in Technical Japanese, is designed to train fourth-year level Japanese language students to read technical materials written for a Japanese audience. Readings will consist of articles and reports taken from publications in fields where Japanese conduct leading-edge research. There will also be an oral/aural component stressing communications strategies for establishing and conducting professional relationships in technical environments. Japanese engineers carrying out advanced studies in Michigan, or employed at the many technical centers in this area, will be an important resource. Students will also be introduced to the uses of technical dictionaries and indexes. Class attendance is mandatory. Students are required to prepare for recitations and for frequent quizzes. Short essays will be assigned. There will be a midterm and a final. (Unedaya)

Literature Courses/Culture Courses

250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture. No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.
Section 001 Reiterations: Filming Fiction in Japan.
Well before Merchant Ivory came on the scene, Japanese film directors made a living turning well-loved novels into movies. Name a classic Japanese film, and you are likely to be dealing with an adaptation. This course examines the dynamics of reiteration in a culture known for its repeated adaptations of cultural materials. What are we saying when we designate one version as "original" and another as "adaptation?" What does "originality" mean in a culture that seems to be constantly rehashing old material? How does the change in medium affect the nature of what is told? In what ways do versions of a story reflect the ideologies of the times in which they are produced? These are the questions we will be asking in reference to the prior texts appropriated by such well-known directors as Kurosawa and Mizoguchi, and the films that resulted. (Danly)

401. Japanese Literature in Translation: Classical Periods to 1600. A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (3). (HU).

A survey of Japanese literature from the eighth century through the sixteenth. All assigned readings are in English translation, and no previous knowledge of Japan or the Japanese language is required. Special attention is given to the great works of the Japanese literary tradition, including the Man'yoshu, the eighth century anthology of native poetry; The Tale of Genji, the novel of court life from the early eleventh century; diaries and essays from the Heian period (ca. 800-1200); the epic war tales of the thirteenth century; and some of the major plays of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. This course, together with its sequel (Japanese 402), is recommended to all students with a general interest in literature or in Japanese culture. Classes are in a lecture and discussion format, with ample opportunity for questions from students. The course has a midterm and final examination, emphasizing essay questions. Also, one short paper of some 8 to 10 pages is required. (Danly)

450. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Literature. Japanese 401 or 402, or permission of instructor. Knowledge of Japanese is not required. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits with permission of the instructor.

This course focuses on major thematic and critical issues in Japanese literature using the considerable body of English translations and studies now available. The method consists of close reading, brief oral presentations preceding discussions, submissions of four short essays during the term and a final long paper. Prerequisites are Japanese 401 or 402; for non-concentrators, some background in any literature, or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the Junior/Senior writing requirement.

Section 001 Love, Sexuality and Gender in Japanese Literature. We will examine the culturally specific meanings of love and sexuality and the fluidity of conventional gender roles and expectations as seen in Japanese literature from the Heian period through modern times. We will explore the dynamics of various kinds of intimate relationships, including heterosexual relationships in and out of marriage, same-sex romantic relationships, parent-child relationships, and love triangles. Texts will include both canonical and non-canonical works: The Gossamer Years (Kagero nikki), The Tale of Genji, The Changelings (Torikaebaya monogatari), The Confessions of Lady Nijo (Towazugatari), medieval tales as translated in Rethinking Sorrow and Tales of Tears and Laughter, The Great Mirror of Male Love (Nanshoku Okagami), Confessions of Love by Uno Chiyo, and The Waiting Years by Enchi Fumiko. (Childs)

461. Social Science Readings in Japanese. Japanese 406. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

This course helps students to develop reading skills necessary to conduct research in Japanese social science topics. Readings are assigned from newspapers, books, and journals in a variety of fields. The emphasis is on the acquisition of "kango" vocabulary which arise in understanding these readings. Class attendance is mandatory. Homework includes a minimum of two hours of preparation per class hour. Students are expected to prepare for the readings and for frequent quizzes so that they can participate actively in discussion in Japanese in class. Japanese essays will be assigned.

475. Japanese Cinema. A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (3). (Excl). Special fee (not to exceed $20) required.
Section 001 Films of Kurosawa.
For Fall Term, 1996, this section is offered jointly with English 417.004. (Howes)


Courses in Korean (Division 409)

101. Beginning Korean. (5). (LR).

This is an introductory course in spoken and written Korean. It will emphasize the aural/oral skill, but attention will also be given to grammatical structure. Class regularly meets five times a week two hours of lecture and three hours of aural/oral practice and daily attendance is expected. In addition, students are required to do additional hours of work for listening practice on their own in the language lab. Through lectures, students will learn Korean characters, be able to read sentences with considerable fluency, and understand the basic grammatical structures of Korean. Based on the knowledge obtained through lectures, recitation classes will help the students develop an ability to use basic conversational expressions freely. The checkpoints for evaluation include homework assignments, weekly quizzes, reading aloud, and oral interviews. The textbook for the course is Myongdo's Korean 1 by A.V. Vandesande. Those who successfully finish the course will gain sustained control of basic conversation. Those interested in taking this course are recommended to see the instructor before registration. (Cho)

201. Second Year Korean. Korean 102 or equivalent. (5). (LR).

This is an intermediate course in spoken and written Korean. It will emphasize the aural/oral skill, but attention will also be given to grammatical structure. Class regularly meets five times a week two hours of lectures and three hours of aural/oral practice and daily attendance is expected. In addition, students are required to do additional hours of work for listening practice on their own in the language lab. Through lectures, students will learn relatively complex structural patterns of Korean, build up their vocabulary, and get acquainted with various aspects of Korean culture and society. Based on the knowledge obtained through lectures, recitation classes will help the students develop an ability to carry on survival level of conversation. In evaluation, weight will be placed on homework assignments, biweekly quizzes, and oral interviews. Those interested in taking this course are recommended to see the instructor before registration. (Cho)

401. Third Year Korean. Korean 202 or equivalent. (5). (Excl).

Third-Year Korean will help students improve their skills, both spoken and written, up to intermediate-high level. Class meets five hours per week 2 hours of lecture and three hours of recitation. In lecture classes, the students will learn Chinese characters, and thereby build up their vocabulary and heighten reading ability. The reading materials will inform the students of various cultural aspects of Korea. Through weekly writing assignments, the students will also learn more accurate syntax, pragmatic ways of expression, and logical ways of thinking in Korean. In recitation classes, strengthened aural/oral training will be given. The students will tell a short story, have free group-discussion, and learn songs. Evaluation will be based on attendance, homework assignments, exams, class activities, and various oral performances. (Cho)

491. Individual Study of Korean Language. Korean 402 and permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 8 credits with permission of instructor.

This course is designed to develop advanced reading and writing skills in modern Korean for future academic work (with stress on Sino-Korean).


Courses in South and Southeast Asia (S&SEA) (Division 483)

S&SEA Language Courses

101. Beginning Thai. (5). (LR).

Standard Thai, the language of Thailand, is typical of several Asian languages in its grammar and tonal pronunciation. Focus of the course is the use of language in everyday situations. Upon successful completion of the two-term sequence, students will be able to conduct conversation dealing with several survival concerns, e.g., introduction, ordering food, transportation, banking, post-office trip, shopping, etc. From the first day of class, students will learn Thai scripts and will be able to read course materials and short passages in Thai at the end of the term. Writing assignments are also assigned. Thai cultures, history, geography, etc. will be offered both in the content of the language lessons and supplementary presentations. Placement test required before registration. (Brown)

103. Beginning Indonesian. (5). (LR).

Indonesian is the national language of Indonesia, a country noted for its rich and deep cultural heritage as well as for its remarkable cultural diversity. With its 180 million speakers, Indonesian is the sixth most prevalently spoken of the world languages. The relatively simple syntactic and grammatical structures which characterize Indonesian make it an accessible language for native speakers of English. The elementary course comprises a two-term sequence designed to provide the student with a basic working knowledge of the Indonesian language. The course aims at the acquisition of the four basic language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing in modern Indonesian. The class emphasizes aural-oral exercises and practice and the learning of culture throughout the course. The text used is keyed to a set of tapes for use in the language lab and concentrates on practical knowledge of the language. Evaluation is based on classroom performance, homework assignments, tests, and a final exam. (Sudarsih)

105. Elementary Hindi-Urdu. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 315 or 365. (4). (LR).

South and Southeast Asia 105-106 is the first year in the sequence of Hindi-Urdu courses offered by the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures. Hindi and Urdu are the respective national languages of India and Pakistan. The course meets four hours per week in four sessions. If enrollments warrant, there will be a separate two credit course during the Fall term intended for students who have some knowledge of the spoken language but do not know the writing system. In the first year only the Devanagari writing system (for Hindi) is introduced. Nastaliq (for Urdu) comes in the second year. The course concentrates on developing skills in reading, writing, speaking, and aural comprehension. Evaluation is based on attendance, written homework assignments, quizzes, dictations, and examinations. There are no prerequisites (no previous knowledge of Hindi is required). (Siddiqi)

107. Beginning Tagalog. (4). (LR).

Tagalog/Filipino is the national language of the Philippines. Elementary Tagalog is a two-term sequence designed to give the student who has little or no knowledge of Tagalog the necessary basis for learning to speak it and to have an acquaintance with the cultural context in which it functions. Tagalog is particularly interesting in the way it has integrated the broad influences of both Spanish and English into its own syntactic and semantic systems. The oral approach is greatly emphasized in the classroom, using questions and answers and short dialogues to develop active use of the language in the most natural way possible. This is complemented by the use of taped lessons. There are frequent short quizzes, short dialogues, and a final examination. At the end of the first year, the student should be able to handle brief exchanges in common social situations and to read and write simple dialogues and essays in Tagalog. Text is Conversational Tagalog: A Functional-Situational Approach by Teresitz Ramos. Supplementary readings and visual presentations will be provided when appropriate. (Weller)

113. Elementary Tamil. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 373. (4). (LR).

This course offers an introduction to spoken and written Tamil, the major Dravidian language spoken in Tamil Nadu, the largest state in southern India, and by the largest minority in Sri Lanka, Singapore, and Malaysia. It is one of the oldest languages of the world with a literary tradition beginning in 3 BC. All major language skills listening, speaking, reading, and writing - are covered. The aim of achieving proficiency in speaking comprehension is to enable the student to function effectively in different everyday situations in a native environment. Class meets in a computer lab once or twice a week to practice listening and reading using a multimedia HyperCard software implemented for Tamil. Public access to a section of this software is possible in the computers at the Modern Language Building. A standard textbook is used, supplemented by reference grammars and additional materials selected or specially prepared by the instructor. Recitation sections emphasize speaking and listening in native contexts at normal speed with near-native pronunciation, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. Students learn to handle the script in which Tamil is written. Reading materials introduce the students to the culture and the religion of Tamil speaking people. Evaluation is based on classroom performance, homework assignments, tests, and a final exam. (Renganathan)

115(381). Beginning Vietnamese. (5). (LR).

Vietnamese 115-116 is the introductory course in reading, listening, speaking and writing the only language of more than 74 million speakers, from the South to the utmost northern part of Vietnam. This country now adopts the free market economy and needs foreign capital and know-how. With the normalization of U.S.-Vietnamese relations, a knowledge of the Vietnamese language and culture will be a crucial asset in enabling one to participate in many opportunities. This first half of the two-term sequence course is designed to accommodate students with no knowledge of the Vietnamese language, as well those with some knowledge who want to develop the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and to improve their knowledge in Vietnamese history and culture. The format will be as follows: four class hours a week will be focused on the aural-oral approach in reading, dialoguing, translating, and responding to the content of the texts using a question-and-answer format. One class hour a week will be devoted to quizzes and tests. In addition, there will be written assignments and works in the language lab. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to communicate in Vietnamese, and classes will be largely conducted in Vietnamese to develop the students' ability to acquire sufficient automaticity and fluency in spoken Vietnamese. Students will be graded on classroom performance, class attendance, homework assignments, and a final examination. (Nguyen)

201. Intermediate Thai. S&SEA 102 or equivalent. (5). (LR).

This course continues and extends the four skills students developed in Thai 101-102. Reading and discussion as well as written assignments from authentic materials will be covered. Also, discussions on topics interesting to students will be covered in order to increase speaking fluency. Class is conducted largely in Thai. Students are required to actively participate in class. (Brown)

203. Intermediate Indonesian. S&SEA 104. (5). (LR).

The course is part of a two-term sequence aimed at increasing the student's proficiency in the four basic language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing in modern Indonesian. Although increasing emphasis is given to the development of reading and writing skills, listening and speaking constitute an integral part of the course which is conducted entirely in Indonesian. Vocabulary building and instruction in matters of cross-cultural sensitivity are of great importance. The primary text used is keyed to a knowledge of the language. Supplementary materials introduce the student to reading modern Indonesian literature. Evaluation is based on classroom performance, homework assignments, tests, and a final exam. (Sudarsih)

205. Intermediate Hindi-Urdu. S&SEA 106. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 316 or 366. (4). (LR).

This course is intended to increase students' skills and proficiency in speaking, comprehending, reading and writing the Devanagari (Hindi) script. Students are also introduced to the Nastaliq (Urdu) writing system. Evaluation is based on attendance, written homework assignments, quizzes, dictations, and examinations. Students with a background in Hindi-Urdu may also enter the sequence at this point. See the instructor for placement examination. (Kumar)

207. Intermediate Tagalog. S&SEA 108 or equivalent. (3). (LR).

This course is designed for the student who has some knowledge of Tagalog and who wishes to develop some fluency in spoken Tagalog and to be acquainted with Tagalog literature. It is a two-term sequence which is essentially a continuation of what has been learned in the first year but there will be more emphasis on reading and writing. Students who have not taken Elementary Tagalog (South and Southeast Asian 107/108) may take this course if they pass an evaluation test to be given by the instructor. The format will be as follows: two class hours a week will be devoted to readings and grammar review, one class hour a week will be devoted to guided conversation. Readings will be assigned and these will provide the framework for the discussion of grammatical points and question-and-answer sessions in Tagalog on the content of the texts. There will be written assignments, a midterm, and a final examination. By the end of the second year, students should have acquired sufficient competence to handle longer conversations, write letters and brief essays, read certain plays, and (with the aid of a dictionary) newspapers and magazines. Course text is Intermediate Tagalog, Developing Cultural Awareness Through Language by Terisita Ramos and Rosalina Morales Goulet. Supplementary readings and visual aids will be provided when appropriate. (Weller)

211. Intermediate Punjabi. S&SEA 112 or 371. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 372. (3). (LR).

This course emphasizes the advanced grammatical constructions, composition, vocabulary development, and conversational skills of modern Punjabi. Particular attention will be paid to the Punjabi verbs and their classifications. Readings will include items from Sikh scripture, a variety of short stories depicting the Punjabi culture, items from Punjabi newspapers, poetry and plays. A video film will be shown to examine the spoken language of the Punjab. Throughout the course the students will be encouraged to communicate in the Punjabi language. There will be two tests: a midterm worth 30% and a final worth 40%. In addition there will be homework assignments worth 20%. The remaining 10% of marks will be allotted to oral communication. Texts: Motia Bhatia, An Intensive Course in Punjabi, (Mysore, Central Institute of Indian Languages, 1985.); Harjit Singh Gill and Henry A. Gleason, Jr., A Reference Grammar of Punjabi, (Patiala, Punjabi University, 1969.); a course pack will also be used. (Singh)

213(435). Intermediate Tamil. S&SEA 114 or 373. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in S&SEA 374. (3). (LR).

This course is a continuation of Elementary Tamil 114. Students with prior knowledge of Tamil may also join this course. See the instructor for placement. This course is designed to further students skills in speaking and writing as well as increase their proficiency in reading and comprehension. A standard textbook is used, supplemented by HyperCard Tamil software consisting of a sequence of graded dialogues chosen from daily conversations and Tamil movies. Evaluation is based on classroom performance, homework assignments, tests, and a final exam. (Renganathan)

215(481). Intermediate Vietnamese. S&SEA 116. (5). (LR).

This course is a continuation of Beginning Vietnamese 115-116. It is designed for the students who have some knowledge of spoken and written Vietnamese and who wish to develop the four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) learned in the two-term Beginning Vietnamese course. The format will be as follows: four class hours a week will be focused on the aural-oral approach in reading, dialoguing, translating, and answering questions on the content of the texts. One class hour a week will be devoted to weekly quizzes or tests. In addition, there will be homework assignments and pronunciation drills. Throughout the course, the students will be encouraged to communicate in Vietnamese, and classes will be largely conducted in Vietnamese. Course grades will be based on classroom performance, class attendance, weekly assignments, and a final examination. (Nguyen)

309. Advanced Sanskrit. S&SEA 110 or 369. (3). (LR).

The continuation of the sequence of courses offered by the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures in Sanskrit. This course works on advanced grammar of classical Sanskrit and also involves reading simple stories, parts of Sanskrit drama and other similar classical literary texts. The goal of the course is to prepare the student to read non-technical classical Sanskrit. (Deshpande)

401. Advanced Thai. S&SEA 202 or equivalent. (4). (Excl).

In this course students will complete the move from material written specifically for foreign language-learners to "real" Thai, including such genres as newspaper articles, essays, and fiction. Class discussion of the reading selections and other topics will be in Thai, giving students the chance to acquire more sophisticated oral skills such as those of advancing and supporting opinions and interpretations. Written assignments will advance students' facility at writing Thai. (Brown)

413(535). Advanced Tamil. S&SEA 214 or 374. (3). (Excl).

This course is designed to develop students' skills in speaking and writing contemporary Tamil, as well as providing an exposure to Tamil poetry from sangam to the modern period. The skill of understanding and using idiomatic expressions and proverbs in Tamil is developed using selected texts from Tamil short stories, novels, radio plays, and movie dialogues. Attempts are made to let the students acquire near native competence. Throughout the course, the students will be encouraged to listen to audio tapes, use the multimedia HyperCard Tamil software and speak Tamil in the class as frequently as possible. Evaluation is based on classroom performance, writing short letters and essays in a given topic and an oral interview. Students who have not taken the sequence of Tamil courses offered by this department may be able to join this course, provided they have prior knowledge of the language by some other means. See the instructor for placement. (Renganathan)

415(597). Advanced Vietnamese. S&SEA 216 or 302. (4). (Excl).

This is the first course in a two-term sequence in advanced Vietnamese. The course will emphasize composition writing and discussion on selected reading materials. This selection of materials, ranging from literary books to newspapers, folk stories and other cultural materials, will provide the students opportunities to get acquainted with various socio-cultural aspects of Vietnam. (Nguyen)

463. Advanced Readings of Modern Indonesian Texts I. S&SEA 404 or equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 6 credits.

The course is a two-term sequence designed to introduce the student to critical readings of modern Indonesian texts. A reading and speaking knowledge of modern Indonesian is prerequisite. With an emphasis on text analysis, the student is required to produce critical commentaries on (and sometimes translations of) selected passages from a variety of assigned texts. The course is run as a seminar with discussion conducted in Indonesian. Evaluation is based on the written assignments and classroom performance.

487. South Asian Languages. A course in phonology and a course in syntax. (3). (Excl).

This is a "directed readings" course, designed for students who have a specific need for individualized language instruction in a South Asian Language. Permission of the instructor is required. Cost:1 WL:3

491. Individual Study of South and Southeast Asian Language. Permission of instructor. (1-5). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of ten credits.

This course is for students who wish to do individual directed study of a Southeast Asian language. Interested students must make arrangements directly with the instructor.

Culture Courses

225/Rel. 225. Hinduism. (3). (HU).

Hinduism is a major world religion practiced by over a billion people, primarily in South Asia, but it also was the precursor of Buddhism, and along with Buddhism it had a major impact on the civilizations in East and Southeast Asia. This class will cover its origins and development, its literature, its belief and practices, its unique social structures and doctrines, its interactions with other religions, and finally its confrontation with and accommodation of "modernity." We will use reading materials, lectures, discussions, and audio and video resources. (Deshpande)

303/Rel. 303. Sikhism. (3). (HU).

The aim of this course is to study Sikh religious beliefs, practices, and institutions. Course emphasizes teachings of the founder, Guru Nanak, and major doctrinal developments under subsequent Gurus. Particular attention will be paid to the scripture, the Adi Granth, and other Sikh texts to understand the evolution of the Sikh community. (Singh)


Courses in Asian Studies (See Asian Languages and Cultures)


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