Germanic Languages and Literatures

Courses in Dutch (Division 357)

111. First Special Speaking and Reading Course. Graduate students should elect the course as Dutch 511. (4). (LR).

This course provides the student with the basics of the Dutch language. We use the ultramodern Dutch course book: Code Nederlands, with tapes and computer programs, and the basic work Introduction to Dutch, especially made for Americans. From everyday conversations, grammatical explanations, exercises, cultural discussions and homework, the student will get a wonderful introduction and first step into the Dutch language and the Dutch-speaking world. Books: F. Kuiken, A. van Kalsbeek Code Nederlands (1 vol.), Meulenhoff Educatief Amsterdam, F. Kuiken, A. van Kalsbeek Code Nederlands Oefenboek (1 vol.), Meulenhoff Educatief Amsterdam, W. Z. Shetter Introduction to Dutch (other title: DUTCH, a practical grammar), J. Delap Beginning Dutch Workbook (both) Wolters-Noordhoff, Groningen. Cost:3 WL:3 (Broos)

231. Second-Year Dutch. Dutch 112 or the equivalent. Graduate students should elect the course as Dutch 531. (4). (LR).

The course will start with an overview of the basic grammar of the Dutch language and will continue with the modern course Code Nederlands with tapes and computer programs. Comics, songs, newspaper articles, and literature will enliven the course and introduce the students to contemporary Dutch society. Books: F. Kuiken, A. van Kalsbeek Code Nederlands (vol. 2) and id. Oefenboek (vol. 2). Cost:3 WL:3 (Broos)

480. Modern Dutch Literature. Dutch 231 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

The course will examine the poetry and prose of both The Netherlands and Belgium in modern times. The reading of poems, short stories, novellas, etc. in the original language will provide the students with material for discussion about authors, opinions, place and points of view of Modern Dutch literature. Topics in the past have included modern Dutch poetry, Dutch colonial literature, the legacy of Anne Frank: World War II in modern Dutch literature. The course will be conducted totally in Dutch. Cost:1 WL:3 (Broos)

491. Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

This course is conducted in English by the annual visiting writer-in-residence, usually a well known novelist or poet chosen by the Dutch Ministry of Culture to represent The Netherlands. The difference from ordinary literature and creative or news writing courses is that you will meet an esteemed writer and have the opportunity to exchange views on culture, literature, the practice of writing, communication, etc. both American and Dutch. Students are encouraged to bring in their own writing for reviewing and critical assessment. The course has not the ordinary professional approach and is open to all lovers of texts, literary or otherwise, both American and European. Regular class attendance and participation in class discussions followed by at least one substantial paper will be required. Cost:1 WL:3

German Courses (Division 379)

101. Elementary Course. All students with prior classwork in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100. (4). (LR).

Please Note: the structure of the beginning German courses has radically changed. All day-time sections will meet collectively for a single hourly lecture once a week (Mondays 2-3). Hourly recitation sections meet for three hours a week (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays; no class on Fridays). You must be concurrently enrolled in the lecture section and a recitation section.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing), while emphasizing content and meaning at all levels and in all spheres of the language acquisition process. The unique combination of a weekly group lecture and individual hourly recitation sections is intended to ensure that the coursework corresponds to the cognitive and intellectual level of adult language learners. The weekly lecture will be devoted to chapter quizzes and presentation of basic points of grammar, as well as linguistic and analytic strategies. Students will learn not only the German language itself, but also about language and the language learning process more generally. During the weeks in which there are no chapter quizzes, a portion of the lecture period will include presentations on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, and literature. Thus, students will be presented with the immediate intellectual applications of their foreign language study and will be prepared to take advantage of the developing language opportunities at the U of M, such as the specialty 232 courses, LAC courses and the expanding German Studies program. In the three hours in small classroom setting (meeting on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays) students practice conversational skills, drill grammar, discuss reading selections in German, and participate in a variety of activities that stretch linguistic ability, as well as intellectual curiosity. By the end of the term students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations. Students will develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and success in other academic fields.

The night section (M Th 7-9) will be coordinated with, but taught separately from the day sections, which will allow non-traditional night students to be able to attend both evening lecture and recitation sections. Cost:2 WL:1

102. Elementary Course. German 101 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

German 102 (Fall '96) completes the final term in the traditional two term introductory German language series for the University of Michigan students who never had high school foreign language training. The course focuses systematically on all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) so that you are sufficiently prepared for more advanced university courses both within and outside of the German Department. By the end of the term, students will have a firm foundation in the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and conversational situations. Students will also develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and success in other academic fields. Most importantly students will find that acquiring the German language in a university setting will not only be intellectually stimulating and fun, but will become useful in a number of ways throughout their academic careers. Cost:2 WL:1

103. Review of Elementary German. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 102. (4). (LR).

German 103 provides a review of the fundamental components of the German language for University of Michigan students who have had prior German language instruction before entering the University of Michigan. Although this class focuses intensively on grammar review, coursework systematically addresses all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) so that students are sufficiently prepared for more advanced university courses both within and outside of the German Department. By the end of the term students will have a firm foundation in the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of German texts and conversational situations. Students will also develop analytic skills and strategies crucial to language learning and success in other academic fields. Most importantly students will find that studying German in a university setting will not only be intellectually stimulating and fun, but will become useful in a number of ways throughout their academic careers. Cost:2 WL:1

111. First Special Reading Course. Undergraduates must obtain permission of the department. (4). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to teach students to read simple German expository prose. Course content focuses on an introduction to the essentials of German grammar and syntax both in class lectures and in texts. Students are required to read but not write and speak German. The course uses traditional methods of instruction which presents rules of grammar and syntax as well as basic vocabulary. Since much memorization is necessary, it is essential that students have time to do required course work which averages about twelve hours each week exclusive of class time. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, three one-hour examinations devoted to specific problems of grammar and vocabulary, and a final examination requiring the translation of sight passages without the aid of a dictionary. The class is taught in English, and the course text is Morgan and Strothman, Grammar for Reading German. There are no course prerequisites, but German 111 is open only to graduate students who wish to fulfill a German foreign language requirement and to advanced undergraduates in special programs who already met the LS&A foreign language requirement. Undergraduates must receive departmental permissions prior to electing the course. Cost:1 WL:1 (Paslick)

112. Second Special Reading Course. German 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of the class. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, one examination during the reading of assigned texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. Cost:1 WL:1

221. Accelerated Third Semester German. Placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or 231. 4 credits granted to those who have completed German 102. (5). (Excl).

This course combines an intensive review of basic grammar with more advanced practice in the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). Substantial emphasis will be placed on providing a firm grammatical base, and on reading, discussing, and writing about authentic German texts from a variety of fields ranging from natural and social science to history, literature and the arts. By the end of the course, students will be able to read and write about short texts from periodicals and textbooks, and from classic texts by Nietzsche, Kafka, etc., independently, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in German 232 and beyond. Requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, three in-class tests, and a final examination. Cost:2 WL:1

231. Second-Year Course. German 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 221. (4). (LR).

In this course, grammar and vocabulary from the first year will be reviewed and extended. Greater emphasis will be placed on reading German texts and talking and writing about them in German. Reading texts include both short literary works and non-fictional texts from a variety of fields ranging from history to science and the arts. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, three in-class tests, and a final examination. Instruction is in German and English. Cost:2 WL:1

232. Second-Year Course. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). Some sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Second course of a two-year sequence in contemporary intermediate German. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can express themselves and the range of situations in which they can function in German-speaking cultures. They will be able to read, comprehend, and discuss a large variety of texts. The language of instruction is German.

Section 001 The German Conception of History. This special theme section explores the problem of History in modern German culture. Modern historical science emerged in German-language Europe in the nineteenth century, and its development was linked to the process of nation-building particular to Germany. Today, too, discussions of German politics, national identity, and culture are saturated with the "problem" of recent German history, in particular the shadow of the Nazi past. In this course we will explore the language of German history as it moved through various stages: Romantic notions of the Volk community; the link between emergent German 'historicism' and the conservative ideal of the authoritarian State; Nietzsche's dramatic repudiation of historicism right up through the fiery public "Historians' Debate" of the 1980s about the significance of the Holocaust and the right of the Germans to a "normal" history. We will work through a number of short texts to produce this broad picture of the language of German history from the birth of nationalism to German reunification. Students will work through the texts with the assistance of a computer module which will help hake connections between the texts and also provide glossary definitions, maps, and timelines, visual and audio-visual sources, and workbook exercises. This innovative project has been supported by the University Instructional Technologies Division. Cost:1 WL:1 (Spector)

Section 002 Contemporary German Society. This section will explore contemporary geographic, economic, social, political and cultural aspects of Germany. We will start at the end of World War II with the two German states putting special emphasis on the period since the Reunification of 1990. These aspects of Germany will be highlighted by special consideration of the situation of the foreigners who have come to Germany since shortly after the end of WW II, first as guest workers (Gastarbeiter) and later as refugees and asylum seekers ("Flüchtlinge und Asylanten"). We will examine various genres and media presentations such as prose, film, poetry, newspaper and magazine articles, radio plays, and television. Students will watch and report on a number of television news reports from Deutsche Welle. Students will also write a number of essays and three exams. Grammar will be reviews according to the needs of the class. The language of instruction is German. Cost:1 WL:1 (VanValkenburg)

Section 003 Mathematical and Scientific German. In this course we will discuss and occasionally do some basic Math, Computer, Physics, Astronomy, and Biology work in German (just as Einstein learned to do these things in English...). The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. This should be easier than it perhaps sounds, because the technical terms are usually very similar in German and English, and there is a clear context for guessing the meaning of unknown words. No background in Math or Science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, and exams. Cost:1 WL:1 (Rastalsky)

Section 004 Topics in Music: Mozart and the Magic Flute. Reading of the libretto in German, singing and contingent on proficiency of the course participants playing of musical highlights from The Magic Flute. In addition to readings in German on highlights in the biographies of Mozart and Magic Flute librettist Immanuel Schickaneder, and on the cultural and historical background of the work's origin, there will be guest lectures and performers (musicologists, stage technicians, musicians, specialists in Viennese culture) demonstrating, some of them in a "hands-on" fashion, their expertise in the work in German of course. Student evaluation based on performance in class participation, regular grammar exercises, essays, oral presentations, and final exam. There are no musical prerequisites for the course. Cost:1 WL:1 (Bailey)

Section 005 Introduction to German Literature. This section is intended for students interested in going on to study German literature at more advanced levels. It will provide an introduction to the language of some representative German literary classics and to some basic concepts of literary interpretation. Works to be read include short stories by Thomas Mann and Kafka, Kafka's "Das Urteil," the "Gretchen Tragedy" from Goethe's Faust, Dürrenmatt's Die Physiker, and a selection of poems.

Section 006 German Crime Stories: Literature and Popular Culture. In this class, we will examine the representation of crime in various texts and genres, with a view to establish some characteristic features of these genres. In particular, we will try to establish what sets "serious" crime "literature" apart from "popular" crime fiction and crime journalism, so that this course will constitute a serious and entertaining introduction to the question "What is literature?" Friedrich Dürrenmatt's novel Der Richter und sein Henker will constitute the main part of this course. We will read stories by other "serious" writers (Max von der Gruen, Guenter Kunert, Wolfdietrich Schnurre) and by "popular" writers from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. We will read newspaper articles and compare their approaches to crimes that caught people's attention. Towards the end, we will discuss Doris Doerrie's movie Happy Birthday, Tuerkel!! Be prepared to read, write and talk a lot. One brief presentation, three short essays, one midterm, one final, some grammar, some fun. Cost:1 WL:1 (Kallmann)

305. Practical German. German 232 or the equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. This course does not satisfy the language requirement. May be elected for credit twice.

The objective of this course is to hone your conversational skills by building a vocabulary which your textbooks do not present. In-class workshops will recreate and dramatize hypothetical situations in a German-speaking environment (bank, university, hospital, party). The communicative basis for a meaningful conversation will continually be enhanced by various word puzzles and games. Various articles from current newspapers or magazines will deepen the understanding of cultural, social, and political currents in German. As these issues are a substantial part of the class discussions, you are expected to subscribe to a German newsletter via e-mail (gratuitously). Regular attendance and active class participation are mandatory. You are required to prepare for classes and give three oral presentations during the term. Cost:1 WL:1

325. Intermediate German. German 232. (3). (Excl).

The sequence of German 325 and 326 is required for concentration in German. It is primarily intended to improve fluency and accuracy in written and spoken German. A portion of each week is devoted to a systematic grammar review. The remaining class time is devoted to German conversation based on readings and topics chosen at the discretion of the individual instructor. A German essay of one or two pages is assigned approximately every week. One or more five-minute oral presentations may be required. The grade will be based on the written assignments, performance in class recitations and a final examination. Cost:2 WL:2 (Paslick, Cowen, VanValkenburg)

Section 003 Contemporary German Politics and Economics. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with contemporary German politics and economics, and to enable them to read and discuss newspaper articles on these topics on their own. Readings will be taken from German newspapers and magazines, and from German articles on the Internet, supplemented as necessary by excerpts from textbooks on German politics and economics. Strong emphasis will be placed on the development of the vocabulary and grammar required to read such articles. Initially, the instructor will select readings and direct discussion; as the term progresses, students will choose and present some of the readings. Course requirements include regular reading assignments; a journal on these readings; weekly quizzes on vocabulary, grammar, and the content of the previous week's readings; a couple of group presentations; and a final exam. Cost:2 WL:1 (Rastalsky)

326. Intermediate German. German 325. (3). (Excl).

Generally taken after 325. This course is designed to improve proficiency in written and spoken German. Up to one third of class time will be spent on grammar review and a weekly composition provides the opportunity to practice grammatical rules and to develop stylistic flexibility. Class activities are informal and varied, but German is used throughout the meetings. There will be ample opportunity for group discussions as well as for brief presentations by each student. Audio and video tapes will be used repeatedly during the term. Cost:1 WL:3

350. Business German. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

This course introduces students to the language of business German and gives them insight into Germany's place in the global economy. The course is organized around major business and economic topics, such as: the geography of business in German; the European Union and Germany's roll therein; trade; traffic and transportation; marketing; industry; money and banking; and ecology. In addition to the basic text, students will read actual business, merchandising and advertising material, newspapers and magazines. There will also be short videos on business and related topics. There will be three major exams, a number of short reports and papers, and a final exam. The language of instruction in German. Cost:1 WL:4 (VanValkenburg)

381. Eighteenth to Nineteenth-Century Drama. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

This course provides an introduction to German literature of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries through several of the great dramas of the period. In conjunction with German 382, 383, 384, or 385 this course can be elected in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The course will include the following texts by Lessing, Lenz, Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, and Büchner. The emphasis of the course is on the analysis of the works, mainly in class discussions. The instructor will also provide background information on the playwrights, their times and the artistic theories they represent. There will be one longer interpretive paper, a midterm exam, and a final exam. These may be written in German or English. The language of instruction is German. Cost:1 WL:4 (Cowen)

384. Short Fiction: Romanticism to Realism. German 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

This course provides an introduction to some of the major figures and movements in German literature from the end of the eighteenth to the second half of the nineteenth century through the study of selected masterworks of short fiction. Furthermore, it offers the student the opportunity to gain some insight into the cultural as well as the social and political trends of this period. The readings consist of short works of fiction by such authors as L. Tieck, A. v.Arnim, E.T.A. Hoffmann, J. v.Eichendorff, H. v.Kleist, G. Büchner, A v.Droste-Hulshoff, F. Grillparzer, and G. Keller. German will be used as much as possible in this class. The course grade will be based on class participation and two papers. Call me at 663-9673 if you need an override. Cost:1 WL:5 (Weiss)

415. The German Language Past and Present. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

The objectives of German 415 are to introduce students to the assumptions, terminology, and methodologies of both descriptive and historical linguistics, and to apply these to a survey of the growth and development of German from pre-literate times to present, with emphasis on the emergence of the standard literary dialect. Although a major concern will be the internal structure of the language, we shall relate this to the cultural context in which the language has evolved. Instruction will be through lectures and discussion. Requirements include a number of homework problems; several in-class written exercises; a final examination; one 10-page term paper; and one 15-minute oral presentation to the class on the content of the term paper. Texts to purchase: Astrid Stedje, Deutsche Sprache gestern und heute; and Michael Clyne, Language and Society in the German-Speaking Countries. Cost:2 WL:3 (Kyes)

425. Advanced German. German 326. (3). (Excl).

Various approaches are used to improve the student's written and spoken German. Each week a composition of at least two pages is assigned. Sometimes the instructor assigns specific topics while at other times students select their own. Occasionally students are required to listen to a tape on some aspect of German history or culture and to use it as a departure point for an essay. Class discussions are based on topics selected by the instructor and the students. Brief presentations by individual students are required. German is used exclusively in class. The final course grade is based on compositions as well as participation in discussion. German 425 is regularly offered during the Fall Term while German 426 is regularly offered during the Winter Term. German 426 may be taken independently of 425. Call me at 663-9673 if you need an override. Cost:1 WL:5 (Weiss)

457. Twentieth Century German Fiction. One year beyond 232 or the equivalent, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This seminar concentrates on modern German texts that depict and/or theorize War and Revolution. We will analyze the literary representations of the sociopolitical conditions, the intellectual and ethical predicaments that arise during and after social upheaval; the following philosophical, literary and political issues will guide our investigation: (1) the conflicts between the individual and the totalitarian (pars pro toto), (2) the aesthetics of war, (3) the relationship between literature and politics, (4) Sprache und Sprachlosigkeit. We will read works by Kafka, Musil, Heinrich and Thomas Mann, Hesse, Jünger, Remarque, Seghers, Weiß, Wolf, Adorno, Heidegger, Heiner Müller. Course requirements: One or two in-class presentations; one short paper, and a term paper of about 15 pages to be written and revised during the second half of the term. The language of instruction will be German. The students' use of German for both classroom and paper is optional. Cost:3 (Rast)

491. German Honors Proseminar. Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Completion of the sequence of German 491 and 492 is required for an Honors concentration in German Studies. Interested students are encouraged to contact the Honors concentration advisor for admission into the program (minimum 3.0 GPA with at least 3.5 in German) for Fall term of their senior year, preferably but not necessarily as early as Winter term of their sophomore year. German 491 is regarded as a preparatory term in anticipation of 492 (Winter), in which each student writes an Honors thesis. The kinds of work to be read will be determined in part by the perceived needs of the students, geared possibly toward already-identified thesis topics and/or toward intensified focus on reading literary texts, acquiring and honing interdisciplinary research skills, and developing a persuasive and sustained argument. Every effort will be made to accommodate students with a broad range of interests from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds. Regardless of ultimate subject matter, the intent of the seminar will be to increase students' critical reading abilities in their chosen field of interest and their familiarity with secondary literature, source material, and contemporary scholarship. Requirements for the course include at least one oral presentation (depending on the number of participants) and two papers (to total about 25 papers, in German or English). Students are urged to contact the Honors Concentration Advisor in advance of the Fall term to arrange an interview in which particular individual needs and interests will be discussed, so that the course may be tailored to fit each group. Cost:2 WL:3

German Literature and Culture in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of German.

375/MARC 375/Rel. 375. Celtic and Nordic Mythology. (3). (Excl).

See Religion 375. (Beck)

417/Anthro. 476/Ling. 417. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics. Ling. 411 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

See Linguistics 417. (Milroy)

Scandinavian Courses (Division 471)

103. Elementary Swedish. (4). (LR).

For students with little or no previous knowledge of Swedish, this course provides a basic introduction to Swedish vocabulary and grammar, with the emphasis placed on developing communicative skills. Extensive practice in listening, speaking and reading and writing. The students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, assignments and tests. The teacher is a native speaker from Sweden. Cost:2 WL:4 (Olvegård)

233. Second-Year Swedish. Swedish 104. (4). (LR).

This course covers the material of a second year course in Swedish language. The emphasis is on speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills. Readings are selected (for oral and written commentary) from contemporary Swedish literature, such as fiction, lyrics, news articles, etc. All instruction will be in Swedish and tests and examinations will be given at regular intervals. Grades will be determined on the basis of class participation and tests. Students needing Swedish 103 and 104 or the equivalent for entry into this course can meet the prerequisite by passing an examination given by the instructor. The teacher is a native speaker from Sweden. Cost:2 WL:4 (Olvegård)

Scandinavian Courses in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of a Scandinavian language.

331. Introduction to Scandinavian Civilization. (3). (HU).

The Scandinavian countries are known for their excellent social services and high degree of social equality. This course is an introduction to as many aspects of Scandinavian culture as we can cover in a term. Guest lecturers will visit the class to talk about such topics as history; myth and folklore; art, architecture, and design; literature and music. The heart of the course will be a month long segment on the Scandinavian welfare state, including economic and gender equality, health care, education, housing, the special problems of minorities, and the challenges facing Scandinavia today. Requirements: attendance, a modest amount of reading, two papers, a final exam. Cost:3 WL:1 (Herold)


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