Fall Course Guide

Slavic Languages and Literatures

Courses in Russian (Division 466)

Fall Term, 1998 (September 8-December 21, 1998)

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Language

101. First-Year Russian. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103 or 111. (4). (LR).
In this course the student is introduced to the basics of Russian pronunciation and grammar. The course begins with an intensive study of the Russian sound system and orthographic rules (the alphabet and correct spelling). Students spend an average of 1.5-2 hours per day working with tapes and writing exercises. The class is supplemented by video shows. Students who intend to concentrate in Russian Language and Literature or in Russian and East European Studies might consider taking the intensive class, Russian 103. Cost:2 WL:4
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102. First-Year Russian, Continued. Russian 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103, 111, or 112. (4). (LR).
In this course, the sequel to Russian 101, students complete their survey of Russian grammar, expand their vocabulary and learn to express themselves in Russian about topics of interest including Russian history and culture. The class is supplemented by video shows. Students are expected to complete 1-2 hours of oral and written homework every night. Cost:2 WL: 4
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103/RC Core 193. Intensive First-Year Russian. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, 111, or 112. (8). (LR).
This course covers in one term what is ordinarily covered in two terms of Russian 101 and 102. The course carries eight credit hours and is designed for highly motivated students who wish to acquire rapid mastery of Russian. It is especially recommended for students intending to choose a concentration in Russian Language and Literature or Russian and East European Studies. Students are expected to complete approximately 16-20 hours of homework per week, including 3-4 hours in the language laboratory. Students are also required to participate in four hours of core-curricular activities outside of the class room per week (daily Russian lunch table; weekly Russian tea). Cost:3 WL:3 (A. Makin)
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201. Second-Year Russian. Russian 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 203. (4). (LR).
This course reviews and expands grammatical concepts first covered during the First-Year Russian (101 and 102) courses, focusing on verbal aspect, declension and the verbs of placement. The course also emphasizes speaking and listening skills. Students are expected to complete 9-12 hours of homework per week. Textbook: V Puti by Frank Miller and Olga Kagan and workbook; cost is $73.00 and covers two terms. Cost:2 WL:4
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202. Second-Year Russian, Continued. Russian 201. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 203. (4). (LR).
This course assumes students' knowledge of the fundamentals of Russian grammar, and involves the use of verbs of motion (with and without special prefixes), the formation and usage of participles and verbal adverbs. Students read and write texts of increasing complexity, discussing Russian and Soviet history, culture and other topics of interest. The course requires 8-12 hours of homework per week. Textbook: V Puti by Frank Miller and Olga Kagan. Cost:2 WL:4
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301. Third-Year Russian. Russian 202, and satisfactory scores on a proficiency test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 303. (4). (Excl).
Third-Year Russian starts with the assumption that the basic aspects of the language have been assimilated, and therefore emphasizes practical skills reading, writing, and speaking. Difficult grammatical points are reviewed, vocabulary is greatly enlarged, idiomatic constructions are studied. It is a recitation course and students are asked to participate in class discussion and give oral reports. Students are evaluated on the basis of their oral and written performances. Cost:2 WL:4 (A. Makin)
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401. Fourth-Year Russian. Russian 302. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 403. (4). (Excl).
Russian 401 is offered during the Fall Term and Russian 402 is offered during the Winter Term of every academic year. Prerequisites: three years of Russian (minimum). Classwork, homework, and labwork include: grammar and word formation, reading and listening (films and TV news included); discussions; oral reports and compositions. Bi-weekly grammar tests and final oral presentation. Textbook: Let's Talk About Life! by Emily Tall and Valentina Vlasikova; cost is $42.00 and covers two terms. Cost:1 WL:4
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413. Business Russian. Russian 302. (3). (Excl).
This course is planned for advanced Russian students (3rd year and above) who are oriented toward economics or business. In particular this would target seniors seeking experience in international business and graduate students in the Center for Russian and East European Studies Master's Degree program (or in various departments, who either wish to pursue employment opportunities in business or government or who wish to get a Ph.D. in economics, political science, or history). The course will focus upon the vocabulary and locations of commercial Russian, both oral and written. Students will be expected to learn format and jargon for various types of business communication. No final examination. (Shevoroshkin)
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Literature

231. Russian Culture and Society: An Introduction. (3). (HU).
This interdisciplinary course seeks to acquaint students with the major achievements of Russian art, music, literature, architecture and cinema, and is taught with the aid of multimedia visual and audio presentations. As we examine the evolution of Russian culture from the 10th century to the present day, we will be exploring everything from Russian icons to the architecture of St. Petersburg, the prose of Dostoevsky and the music of Shostakovich, the exquisite Easter eggs designed by the jeweler Carl Fabergé for the last Russian tsars, and classics of Russian cinema such as Eisenstein's great film Ivan the Terrible, in whose production Stalin played a direct role. Despite the raising of the Iron Curtain at the end of the 1980s, Russia continues to remain "a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma", and this course provides an opportunity to explore in detail the paradoxes of a society which has produced some of the world's most barbaric rulers and some of its finest artists, writers, and musicians. The course is designed to appeal to students with no background in Russian studies, and to those thinking about becoming Russian concentrators. No knowledge of Russian is required. Cost: 3
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351. Introduction to Russian Literature. Russian 202. (3). (Excl).
This course is an introduction to Russian prose. Classes are conducted in Russian. There are essays, a midterm and a final (all in Russian). Class discussion is encouraged. The course increases vocabulary, reading speed, written and oral fluency, while developing literary-analytical skills. (M. Makin)
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355. Supervised Reading of Russian Literature. Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit twice.
Students develop a long-term reading and writing project on a topic or topics in Russian literary or linguistic studies, in consultation with a member of the faculty. Readings usually include substantial amounts of Russian. Weekly meetings with the supervisor may be conducted in English or Russian. Writing assignments made according to the number of credit hours elected, but must correspond to the writing expectations of upper-level department courses.
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449. Twentieth-Century Russian Literature. A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).
This historical survey of Russian literature from 1890 to 1921 covers the final achievements of realism and the response to modernism in the later works of Tolstoy and Chekhov, the art of symbolism, the post-symbolic currents in poetry and prose, and the major literary events of the first post-revolutionary decade both in the USSR and in exile. The required reading includes English translations of representative poems by Solov'ev, Briusov, Bal'mont, Merezhkovsky, Hippius, Sologub, Blok, Belyi, Viacheslav Ivanov, Annensky, Kuzmin, Khodasevich, Gumilev, Akhmatova, Mandel'stam, Khlebnikov, Maiakovsky, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva, Esenin, and Kliuev. Students select their own readings in prose and drama out of an extensive list of titles ranging from Solov'ev's Three Conversations through Belyi's Petersburg to Zamiatin's We. Midterm and a final take-home examination. (Ronen)
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451/RC Hums. 451. Survey of Russian Literature. A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).
This course focuses on the masterpieces of Russian fiction written between 1820 and 1870, including such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. Evolving fast from Romanticism to High Realism, this period marks a blossoming of Russian culture, despite strained relations with political authorities. We will trace how writers treated the political, social, intellectual and religious issues dividing their contemporaries, creating a unique kind of literature that claimed authority over society in settling these problems. Topics include romantic self-fashioning and posturing (including such risky aristocratic games as dueling and gambling), gender relations, the fate of the educated in society, violence and repentance, reform and stagnation, history and the private self, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. Participation in class discussion, two short papers, and a final exam. Cost:2 WL:1 (Schönle)
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453. Emigre Literature: Nabokov. A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (Excl).
A detailed survey and analysis of Nabokov Russian and English novels, short stories, poetry, and plays. (Ronen)
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463. Chekhov. A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (Excl).
A detailed examination of the literary career of Anton Chekhov: his prose and drama are analyzed and assessed in the context of the literary, social, and political currents of his time, and as masterpieces of Russian literature. An informal lecture course, with contributions and discussion from students encouraged. This course should appeal to anyone interested in short story or in modern drama. It is taught in English, and all readings may be done in English. Two papers, midterm and final examinations. Cost:1 WL:3 (M. Makin)
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491. Senior Honors Course. Approval of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of Russian 491 and 492.
The first half of the two-term Honors course. Honors students, working in consultation with the Honors adviser and a thesis supervisor conduct research on an area of literary or linguistic studies. By the end of 491 the students should have a detailed bibliography and a prospectus for a thesis. Regular meetings with the adviser and participation in an informal seminar are expected. Studies continue with 492.
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