Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in Afroamerican and African Studies (Division 311)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for Afroamerican and African Studies.


CAAS 100. Introduction to Afro-American Studies.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Walton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces and provides a general overview of the area of Afroamerican Studies. It employs a multidisciplinary perspective which combines elements from conventional historical, political, sociocultural, and behavioral orientations in the analysis of Afroamerican culture and institutions. The course format is a lecture-discussion with two weekly lectures. Students meet with GSIs once weekly to discuss course readings and lectures. The course will be supplemented by guest lecturers, selected CAAS colloquia, films, and special projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 103. First Year Social Science Seminar.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 001 Barrel of A Pen: African Politics in Literature

Instructor(s): Yaw Twumasi (yawt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Africans have lived in an intensely political era since the end of World War II. They have struggled for independence, charted plans for decolonization, promoted and suffered the rise of authoritarian regimes, and debated and experimented with a wide variety of political frameworks for economic and social development. This course looks at the central role played by African writers in shaping the politics of this era. Readings will be selected from the works of writers, men and women, from throughout the continent, including Chinua Achebe, Ama Ata Aidoo, Ayi Kwei Armah, Mariama Ba, Camara Laye, Ngugi wa Thiongo, and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 108/Hist. of Art 108. Introduction to African Art.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/ha108-001.html

See History of Art 108.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CAAS 203. Issues in Afro-American Development.

Politics, Economics, and Development

Section 001 Affirmative Action. Meets with Women's Studies 253.001

Instructor(s): Nesha Haniff (nzh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

There is a great concern that all the rights gained in the sixties are now being eroded by legal challenges to affirmative action rules. Indeed there is a hue and cry that there is now reverse discrimination and that preferential treatment is illegal. The African American community in particular appears to be greatly alarmed by these challenges and is looking for ways to respond to these set backs. This course will address the dilemma of the response and attempt to shape some thinking about the fight for affirmative action. The cases at the University of Michigan and the University of Texas will be examined not for their legal construct but for their meaning as a social construct. In addition Proposition 209 will be discussed as an important watershed in the anti-civil rights movement. The anti-affirmative action forces, and the dilemma of African-Americans and other minorities against affirmative action will be seriously addressed. Some attention will be paid to Justice Clarence Thomas and Mr. Ward Connerly, two major figures against affirmative action. The objective is to begin the process of cogent action and to develop the language to articulate affirmative action as a right and not a benefit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 231/Hist. 275. Survey of Afro-American History, II.

Historical Perspectives

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 275.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CAAS 274/English 274. Introduction to Afro-American Literature.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 274.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 303/Soc. 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michelle Harris-Reid (hreid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or CAAS. (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Sociology 303.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 322/NR&E 335. Introduction to Environmental Politics: Race, Class, and Gender.

Politics, Economics, and Development

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dorceta Taylor (dorceta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course seeks to help students understand the basis of certain environmental beliefs, attitudes, and perceptions. Students will analyze how these attitudes and perceptions influence the way the environment is defined and the kinds of political action people pursue (if they pursue any at all). Students will look at the changing structure, political dynamics, racial and gender composition of the environmental movement. The class will study the role of whites, Native Americans, African Americans, Latinos, and Asians in developing environmental discourses. The course will examine the environmental justice movement and other forms of grassroots environmentalism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 331/Psych. 316. The World of the Black Child.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vonnie McLoyd

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An analysis of the socio-cultural and institutional forces which influence the socialization and development of Black children; examines the child's perception of these forces and implications for the educational experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 341/Theatre 222. Introduction to Black Theatre.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001.

Instructor(s): OyamO (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 222.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 348/Dance 358 (Music). Dance in Culture: Origins of Jazz Dance.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001 Dances of Latinas/Latinos. Meets with American Culture 311.001

Instructor(s): Evelyn Velez Aguayo (aguayo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 311.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 001 Economic History of African Americans

Instructor(s): Warren Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will cover the economic history of Africans in America from the 15th century to the present, with emphasis placed on the historical roots of contemporary African-American life. Students will leave the course with well-informed opinions on the following topics: the contributions of African Americans to American economic development; the economic foundations and legacies of racial slavery in the United States; the economic significance and meaning of freedom and citizenship; the economic thought of African Americans; the economic structure of Jim Crow and the responses of African Americans to it; the economic causes and consequences of the Black migration to the north; the economics of the Civil Rights Movement; the changing class structure of the Black community; the economics of Black family structure; markets vs. the state in Black economic development; an accounting of contemporary Black economic resources; African Americans in the global economy; and economic strategies for the future.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 002 The Epidemic of HIV, AIDS in the African American and Hispanic Communities. Meets with Women's Studies 342.001

Instructor(s): Nesha Haniff (nzh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

At present the HIV spread in the United States is highest in the African American and Hispanic communities. Hispanic and African American men and women represent the highest incidence of HIV infection and deaths from AIDS in the US. This epidemic in these communities is at present unabated for many reasons. This is a very complex issue and very many factors affect the current status of this epidemic only some of which will be addressed here. This course will examine gender relations what are the dynamics of the relationship between men and women in which men and women put each other at risk for HIV infection? What contributes to such behavior? How does one deal with the HIV infection and not drug addiction? Is it possible to reduce HIV infection without such intervention? And what about homophobia in these communities, and poverty and the whole culture of health? Finally the issue of race how does race shape the current level of the epidemic? And more importantly how does it affect the solution in reducing the epidemic? What can be learned from the gay community who was able to effectively reduce the spread of HIV in their community? The lessons to solutions certainly seems to correlate very strongly with race and gender.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 360. Afro-American Art.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jon Onye Lockard

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course:

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 403. Education and Development in Africa.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Teshome Wagaw (twagaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for: (1) those who plan a career in international education as teachers or as other specialists; (2) practicing and prospective teachers who desire to broaden their understanding of the process and dynamics of educational development in other cultures, e.g., Africa; and (3) nonspecialists who wish to understand the problems and ramifications of educational development upon the development of national resources. For convenience of treatment, the course will be organized under three broad divisions of time, i.e., indigenous (traditional), colonial, and national education.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 408. African Economies: Social and Political Settings.

Politics, Economics, and Development

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yaw Twumasi (yawt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A study of the factors which contribute to current economic conditions in Africa: the problems and the potential for change; traditionalism and modernism in African economics; colonial economics; and colonial economic policies. Uses case studies of representative countries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, an electronic override will be issued.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 426. Urban Redevelopment and Social Justice.

Politics, Economics, and Development

Section 001 Urban Redevelopment & Social Justice Can We Have Both? A Seminar for Future Professionals

Instructor(s): James Chaffers (chaffers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Taught from the perspective of a registered architect, this course is organized around topical issues of design, professionalism, and equity in urban resources development. Intended primarily for students with non-architectural backgrounds, the course seeks to provide a spirited exploration of the explicit (and subtle) connections between people, land, and power in our cities and the specific effects of these linkages upon contemporary urban rebuilding. In the main, our explorations are aimed at providing a broadened philosophical understanding of the "Who?" and "Why?" of contemporary urban redevelopment policies particularly as such policies impact on the emerging "central city." A seminar format will be followed, combining formal and informal lectures, slide presentations, selected case studies, selected readings, and a series of student-generated workshops. Continued active class participation and the preparation of a thirty-minute audio cassette tape for presentation near the end of the term are basic course requirements. Ongoing class dialogue will be augmented periodically with urban field trips and invited guests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 444/Anthro. 414. Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell Owusu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 414.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 446/Hist. 446. Africa to 1850.

Historical Perspectives

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Diouf

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 446.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 449/Poli. Sci. 459. African Politics.

Politics, Economics, and Development

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Widner (jwidner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent study of the Third World; Poli. Sci. 465 is recommended but not required. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Political Science 459.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 450. Law, Race, and the Historical Process, I.

Politics, Economics, and Development

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald Woods

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Law defines the status and prospects of Blacks, occupies a key role in Black ideological debates and organizational activity, and reflects the dominant crises in United States and world history. This course covers the period from the initial interaction between Blacks and the processes of law in colonial North America to the beginnings of the modern Civil Rights era. It reviews the law of slavery and the slave trade, the Constitution and the status of Blacks in the ante-bellum period, Constitutional and legislative developments during Reconstruction, and the legal circumstance of Blacks in the era of Jim Crow segregation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 001 The Life & Times of Muhammad Ali. Meets with Women's Studies 483.002

Instructor(s): Nesha Haniff (nzh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Muhammad Ali has been named by many as the greatest athlete of the 20th Century. His life reflects the transformation of race and gender which occurred in 20th Century United States. To be male and Black and successful was to be a performer or an athlete. Muhammad Ali performed as an athlete in the most grueling sport and in so doing transformed the sport, himself, and America. He spoke when he should have been silent, he was beautiful when he should have been ugly, he was a Black Muslim when he should have been a Christian, he was sent to jail for refusing to be inducted in the United States Army, and he never knew his place. He was greatly reviled and now greatly adored by many of the same people who rejected him. For all athletes, his life is a necessary study for it teaches that sports can be an arena for transforming society. For those interested in the study of gender, the Life and Times of Muhammad Ali is quite an exploration, since it involves us in understanding the constructions of maleness and sports, maleness and religion, and the perception of women in each of these domains. And finally race and its inextricable connection to poverty, sport, and politics must be examined. David Remnick's book King of the World will be one of the texts as well as video and film material. There is an enormous body of work on this athlete, and this course will use much of it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 459/Anthro. 451. African-American Religion.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in the social sciences. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 451.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 476/Engl. 478. Contemporary Afro-American Literature.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001 The African-American Novel

Instructor(s): Arlene Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 478.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 489/English 479. Topics in Afro-American Literature.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001 African-American Literature and the Politics of Civil Rights, 1954-1974.

Instructor(s): Marlon Ross (mbross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 274 and/or 338 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 479.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 001 France, Africa, and Genocide: A Focus on Rwanda. (2 credits). Meets with History 590.001 and French 636.001

Instructor(s): Jose Kagabo

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 590.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 510. Supervised Research.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual study under the direction of a departmental staff member. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 521/Soc. 521. African American Intellectual Thought.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alford Young, Jr. (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to explore some debates and arguments constructed by African American scholars on the "Negro Problem." The objective will be to ascertain how African American scholarly debate and commentary has framed definitions of, and has posed solutions for, the social condition of the African American community throughout the twentieth century. More specifically, we will consider how these scholars framed their arguments within larger intellectual and disciplinary frameworks. In doing so, we will attend to the historical contexts that circumscribe these arguments. This course will involve seminar-style discussion. Students will be evaluated on a research paper that explores some dimension of African American scholarly inquiry on a social issue of pertinence to Black Americans. There also will be brief written assignments that will facilitate the development of the term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 001 Theories of Race/Practices of Difference. Meets with History 593.001

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 593.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

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