Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in American Culture (Division 315)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for American Culture.


Unless otherwise stated, the permission required for the repetition for credit of specifically designated courses is that of the student's concentration or BGS advisor.

Courses in Ojibwa

A full sequence of Ojibwa cannot be guaranteed. Students must consult with the American Culture Program Office before undertaking Ojibwa to satisfy the College language requirement.


Amer. Cult. 102. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 Politics and Culture of Race in Post-1945 U.S. Meets with Hist 196.003. Evening Meetings on Sept. 13 & Nov. 13, 7-10 P.M. Required As Part of First-Year Intergroup Relations Seminars (FIGS)

Instructor(s): Matthew Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine how changing ideas of race and race relations have affected life in the United States over the past fifty years. Students will consider a wide range of texts from government reports and historical analyses to novels, movies, and popular music to understand the role that debates over the meaning of race have played in recent political, cultural, and social movements. The course will be divided into three units: (1) the changing meaning of race during World War II and its aftermath; (2) the rise and fall of the civil rights movement; and (3) race and current debates over affirmative action, multiculturalism, immigration, and the criminal justice system. Students will write a brief paper at the end of each unit and will also participate in the First-Year Inter-Group Seminars (FIGS) program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 201. American Values.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Candida Smith (candidas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide an introduction to the relation of cultural forms to their political, economic, intellectual, and social contexts. We focus on cultural processes and interactions in the United States in order to explore ideals, aspirations, conflicts, visions, and material realities that have defined American culture. While this is not a history course, we will examine how residents of the early Republic viewed the nature of social relationships. We will also look at nineteenth- and early twentieth-century efforts to make sense of industrial growth, national expansion, and urbanization. We will discuss contemporary ideas about race, the economy, and the government, and how those ideas might differ from those of earlier generations. We will think about how Americans have expressed their feelings about patriotism and war, race and national progress, the power of the local and the claims of the nation, as well as the privileged place given to domesticity as a solution to the moral problems of industrial capitalism.

The material to be covered is diverse and includes autobiography and essays, fiction, poetry, painting and sculpture, photography, parades and civic holidays, journalism, advertising, cinema and television. In addition to reviewing image content, we will analyze how professional and formal constraints set boundaries to what messages could emerge in different media at any historical moment. This combination of historical, theoretical, and institutional analyses will allow students to see cultural production as a dynamic process actively shaping and reshaping understanding of primary social differences within American society. The course will emphasize that cultural production is fluid and protean. Through a comparative analysis of forms, the students will see different regimes of representation overlapping with each other.

The course is organized around case studies that progressively allow for more complex analysis of cultural representation, production, consumption, and regulation. In each course segment, students study examples of cultural forms that have reinforced or undermined racial, ethnic, and gender stereotypes. We will give attention to theories of stereotypes and provide a history of the images available for the construction of national, racial, and ethnic identities. An important part of this story is the history of images and conceptions of family life. We will see that racial and ethnic stereotypes have rested upon conceptions of various groups having deficient or decadent forms of family association. We will also examine debates over the responsibilities of cultural producers to use their work to transform the ways their audiences view the world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Amer. Cult. 204. Themes in American Culture.

Section 001 A History of Childbirth in America: Early Republic to the Present

Instructor(s): Chris Bass (cbass@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class will explore the history of childbirth in the U.S. from two different perspectives: the mother; and the person assisting with the birth. By exploring these two very different perspectives we will learn a great deal about the issues that have been, and continue to be, important to women giving birth. We will also focus on the factors that have influenced who has assisted birthing women over the past two hundred years. In addition, we will look at the medical, social, and cultural aspects of childbirth and how they intersect and influence one another. We will also explore gender and power dynamics in the birthing room and how socio-economic factors and race influence childbirth practices and experiences. The class format will focus primarily on discussion of weekly reading assignments with a few short lectures. There will be several short reaction papers, 2-3 pages in length. Students will also learn how to work with primary sources at the Bentley Historical Library which will result in a research paper. There will be a midterm and final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 001 Flesh and Blood: The Body in American Culture

Instructor(s): Colin Johnson (crj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Insofar as we all have them, bodies are a central element of any culture; American culture evidences no exception to this axiom. In fact, one might argue that Americans are peculiarly obsessed with their bodies and the bodies of others. We put more food into our bodies than people in other societies. We exercise more obsessively to take fat off of our bodies than people in other societies. We police the pleasure-seeking ends to which our bodies may put in a way that is unheard of in other cultures. And at the same time commodified images of American bodies saturate mass media the world over. In this course we will be considering the meaning and significance of the body in everyday life in the United States. We will balance theoretical considerations of the body as a surface on which cultural understanding is produced and experienced with a respect for its material possibilities and limitations. The only prerequisite for this course, then, is that you have a body and that you be willing to take it slightly less for granted throughout the term.

The course is organized roughly into three five-week sections. The first section, Bodies of Knowledge, will draw into dialogue a number of theoretical frameworks for thinking about the possibilities and limitations of the human body. Readings will include recent scholarship in medicine and the law, as well as the work of contemporary feminist and queer theorists. The second section, Knowledge of Bodies, will survey several cultural sites in which the body plays a particularly central role. Among other subjects we will discuss labor (bodies at work), pornography (bodies on display), and transsexualism (bodies in transition). You will be expected to consider these and other topics using the theoretical paradigms and critical strategies discussed during the first five-week portion of the class. The structure of the final section, Other(ed) Bodies, will be determined by the research interests of the members of the class. You will be expected to suggest other kinds of bodies for us to think about as group: athletic bodies; the corporate body; disabled bodies; alien bodies; the body politic; healthy bodies; fashionable bodies; anti-bodies, hairy bodies (believe it or not there is material on this); or any other bodies that seem relevant, interesting, and worthy of our collective consideration. Ideally the chosen topics will correspond to work being done by members of the class, and readings will be assigned taking your suggestions into account. This will allow you to use the class as an intellectual resource while you are researching and composing your final papers.

Grades for the course will be determined using two factors. Classroom participation and regular attendance are very important and will count for 20% of the final grade in the course. You will find that being punctual, turning assignments in on time, and coming to class having done the reading will endear you the instructor very quickly. Not doing these things will, needless to say, irritate him immensely. The remainder of your grade will be determined by your performance on three papers; two shorter papers of 5 to 7 pages in length and one longer paper of 10 to 15 pages in length. In the first paper you will be expected to review, assess, and critique two or more of the theoretical frameworks for understanding the body discussed in class. In the second paper you will be required to use those critical frameworks to make sense of the bodies being considered in the second section of the course. The final, longer paper will be your opportunity to read, interpret, critique, analyze, or reconsider the body or bodies of your choice. These three papers will count for 20%, 20%, and 40% of your final grade respectively. Short of a natural disaster in which we all find ourselves unable to complete our work for the term, I do not plan to grant any incompletes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 212. Introduction to Latino Studies Social Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Tomas Almaguer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed as a broad overview of the major topics, themes, and methodologies in social science research in Latino Studies. The goal is to introduce students to the diverse experiences of different Latino groups, primarily Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans, in different regions of the country in order to critically assess similarities as well as differences in their historical and contemporary experiences in the United States.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 214. Introduction to Asian American Studies Social Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Introduction to Asian American Studies will examine the nature of American culture and society through a specific study of one racial/ethnic group, Asian Americans. The Asian American experience reveals the dynamics of race relations and economic stratification in the USA as well as the continuing process of defining America and American. This course provides an introductory study of the experience of Asian immigrants and their citizen descendants in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The groups covered include Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Pacific Islander, South Asian, and Southeast Asian Americans as well as the heterogeneity within the various ethnic communities, such as gender, class, generation, and region. Topics for discussion will include international/domestic relations, immigration policy, ethnic literary expressions. The format of this introductory course is largely lecture with an emphasis on encouraging and incorporating student discussion and dialogue especially in applying their knowledge gained from this course to an analysis of contemporary American society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 217. Introduction to Native American Studies Humanities.

Section 001 Spiderwoman's Children

Instructor(s): Betty Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an introductory course to the historical and literary cultures of Native America. We will trace the evolution of the indigenous cultures of the United States through pre-contact oral literature, tribal colonization, and removal to the reservation, the creation of the Native American as American citizen, and explore native identity as conceived by native writers and American popular culture at the end of the 20th century. We will rely, when possible, on the words of Native Americans to discuss "contact" between tribal peoples and EuroAmericans and the resulting "adaptations" in tribal culture and identity. In addition to literature, we will reply on film, documentary and popular, for the representation of native experience and to chart images of the American Indian. Students are not expected to have knowledge of native history or literature; the course is designed to provide an introduction to both. An advanced course, English 382, will be taught in Winter term. There will be two lecture sessions and one discussion section per week. Students will be required to keep a journal of their readings, to participate in discussion groups, and take a midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 222. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Non-LS&A students must have permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to give the conversational and cultural skills necessary to enable students to use Ojibwa in real life situations. The teaching methods are entirely inductive, and the role of writing is downplayed. There is considerable emphasis on teaching culturally appropriate behavior, and the simple conversational patterns of greetings, leave takings, introductions, table talk, etc.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 223. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 222 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Amer. Cult. 230/Hist. of Art 230. Art and Life in 19th-Century America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/ha230-001.html

See History of Art 230.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Amer. Cult. 240/WS 240. Introduction to Women's Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anne Hermann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Women's Studies 240.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 001 Hollywood Film Industry and American National Identities. (3 Credits). Required Film Lab on Wednesday 7-9pm

Instructor(s): Jonathan Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will study how an idealized model of American national identity got established, questioned by the Hollywood film industry between (roughly) 1930 and 1980. The Hollywood studio film was distinguished by its ability to project images of normative Americans and to undercut those notions; in Hollywood, threats and alternatives to that identity were constructed, undermined, and remade sometimes in the very same film. We'll witness how films like Stagecoach, Scarface, It's a Wonderful Life, Shadow of a Doubt postulate models of Americans and/or the threat to it; then we'll see how more recent films like The Godfather, Chinatown, and Unforgiven extend this process by challenging the rules by which these genres work. We'll also witness Hollywood's treatment of such issues as race, immigration, sexuality, and the family and test the Hollywood version against acts of literary imagination, historical analysis, sociological inquiry. Requirements: journals; one paper; midterm; and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 002 Elizabeth Cady Stanton As Social Theorist. (1 credit). Meets with American Culture 601.001 and Women's Studies 481.001. Meets September 15, 22, & 29 in Addition to 2 Public Evening Lectures By Professor Ellen Dubois, Professor of History, UCLA (Dates to be Announced). Graduate Students Should Enroll Under AC 601.001

Instructor(s): Ellen Dubois , Richard Candida Smith (candidas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will be team taught by Ellen Dubois, (Professor of History at UCLA), and Richard Candida Smith (Associate Professor of History and American Culture). During her visit to campus, Prof. Dubois will give four public lectures on Elizabeth Cady Stanton's social theory that will explore the relationship of Stanton's conception of feminism to liberal political theory, common sense philosophy, and contemporary debates about scientific method. The lectures address a major gap in the literature of nineteenth-century feminism in the United States by developing the intellectual history accompanying Stanton's public career. The topics of the four lectures are: (1) Stanton on the history and future of marriage; (2) Stanton on race, community, and the educated suffrage; (3) The Woman's Bible and the modern approach to religion; (4) Stanton on the idea of America. The lecture series will be accompanied by an intensive three-week seminar for graduate students that will allow for an opportunity to explore and critique Stanton's intellectual legacy. Students will read primary texts by Stanton and her contemporaries and assess how incorporation of a deeper intellectual history might alter historical interpretations of the women's movement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 001 Empowering Families and Communities. (4 credits). Meets with Psychology 319 and 320

Instructor(s): Lorraine Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu), Jacqueline Mattis

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

R&E

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 319.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 311. Topics in Ethnic Studies.

Section 001 Dances of Latinas/Latinos. Meets with CAAS 348

Instructor(s): Evelyn Velez Aguayo (aguayo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of advisor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine contemporary dance and performance art as a transformative form beyond the body. Through an analysis of selected choreography and performance, we will establish a dialogue that recreates the historical-political-cultural background and context of works about Puerto Rico, New York, and Latino America. The choreography presented will focus on factors such as race, class, gender, and sexuality. We will examine choreography and other artistic collaborative efforts (i.e., music/composers, installation, performer, literature, and visual art) within the issues of cultural identity and how this affects process, movement, and the dance aesthetics. Students are required to participate through movement, discussion, observation, analysis, and performance. Other requirements include: related readings of text and articles; journal entries; one critical essay; written critiques; and complete participation in discussions, workshops and attendance to performances. Taught by Puerto Rican Choreographer/Performance Artist/Assistant Professor of Dance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 313/Anthro. 314. Cuba and its Diaspora.

Section 001 Required Film Screening T, 5-7 pm

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing R&E

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 314.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 322. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 223 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to improve the basic conversational skills of the student who knows some Ojibwa. The emphasis in class is on increasing the range of situations in which the student can use Ojibwa in real life. Some emphasis is placed on teaching the students to be able to learn more Ojibwa outside of the classroom, by talking and using the language with native speakers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of instructor required

Amer. Cult. 323. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 322 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 322.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of instructor required

Amer. Cult. 335. Arts and Culture in American Life.

Section 001 Arts and Culture in American Life

Instructor(s): Paul Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to modern American cultural history, this course will establish the late nineteenth-century context and then explore key topics in twentieth-century American artistic life and popular culture. Special emphasis will be placed on racial diversity and the politics of culture in the first half of the twentieth century. We will approach these themes especially through developments in music, literature, art, and film. The multidisciplinary perspective developed here will introduce students to the interpretation of a spectrum of cultural phenomena including Duke Ellington's jazz music, Zora Neale Hurston's literature, Diego Rivera's murals, Frank Capra's popular films, Jackson Pollock's abstract expressionist painting, and more recent popular musics as sites of historical enquiry. The course will explore how the elite art practices and discourses of modernism and postmodernism developed not in an isolated vacuum but rather as symbiotic responses to the ever changing commercialization of cultural life and ordinary leisure. Therefore, the rise and transformation of mass culture will be of particular interest. As the course moves up to the present time, we will emphasize how the multiple worlds of popular music continue to serve as battlegrounds over the representation of gender roles, cultural identity, and racial and ethnic diversity. The format is largely lecture, depending on the final enrollment. Requirements should include attendance, midterm and final exam, brief written commentaries, and periodic reading quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 342/Hist. 368/WS 360. History of the Family in the U.S.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 368.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 350. Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Twentieth Century Radical Movements: Culture and Commitment

Instructor(s): Alan Wald (awald@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 201, junior standing, or concentration in American Culture. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a required seminar for juniors concentrating in American Culture that will meet weekly to examine various methods of addressing "commitment" in mid-20th-century U.S. culture. The term "commitment" refers to the relationship of intellectuals, writers, and other cultural workers to issues of oppression and social transformation, such as racism, international war, class inequality, sexism, and academic freedom. Among the approaches of inquiry to be engaged are oral history, narrative historical scholarship, cultural studies methodology, documentary materials, film, fiction, and autobiography. A range of perspectives will be included, and seminar members will be able to collectively plan some of the sessions. A few of the texts that we might employ are George Lipsitz, Rainbow at Midnight; Michael Denning, The Cultural Front; Robin Kelley, Race Rebels; Paula Rabinowitz, Labor and Desire; Irving Howe, A Margin of Hope; Victor Navasky, Naming Names; Chester Himes, The Lonely Crusade; and Tess Slesinger, The Unpossessed. Requirements include full participation, a diagnostic essay and a substantial research paper, presentation of material to the seminar, and possibly a short final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 351. Race and American Cinema.

Section 001 Film Showings on Tuesday and Thursday 7-9pm

Instructor(s): Catherine Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on an analysis of the representation of racial and ethnic groups in American cinema as it has developed in the Hollywood film industry and in independent productions from the silent period in the Teens and Twenties to the use of full-sound, color, and digital imagery in the Nineties. Topics to be studied include: the historical barriers to the access of certain groups to positions of power in Hollywood; the traditional role played by the family and heterosexual romance in shaping ethnic and racial identity; the definition and sources of the screen stereotype; and the specific strategies employed by independent directors to critique and combat the oversimplified and discriminatory portrayals found in dominant cinema. Special attention will be given to the intersection of racial representation with the themes of class and gender difference; ethnicities in relation; and the agency of performers, as well as directors, in alternately perpetuating and subverting screen stereotypes. We will compare and discuss the representation of African/Asian/Native/Italian/Indian Americans and Latinas/os as it has been specifically shaped by the use of cinematographic language and technologies; events in the broader historical and social sphere; and interpretations voiced by different audiences. Screenings will feature mostly fiction films, along with documentaries where appropriate. Readings will provide insight into film history, the production history of given films, race as it has been experienced by various communities, and conceptual frameworks to be used in textual analysis. The course has two lectures, one film showing and a small discussion group per week. Assignments include a journal of film criticism, a quiz, a midterm, and a term paper/project to be presented in class. Students should reserve Tuesday and Thursday 7-9pm for mandatory film viewings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 360/Great Books 350/Hist. 360. Great Books of the Founding Fathers.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mills Thornton (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Great Books 350.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 374/Hist. 374. The Politics and Culture of the "Sixties."

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Classic Rock, Motown, Hippies, Freedom Rides, Draft Card and Bra Burnings, the Vietnam Syndrome, and the Great Society. The "Sixties" have a mythic quality in our political and cultural life. The current debate over the 1960's and the history of that decade mirror the very essence of American culture. This is the decade of peace, optimism, cultural turbulence, despair, war, and frustration. It was a time when basic assumptions and institutions were challenged. This course will explore the nature of American society through a look at the social movements of the 1960's. Specifically, we will examine the relationship between political and cultural change during the 1960's. How did movements for political and social change affect the nation's popular culture? Were cultural and demographic changes at the root of the decade's political upheavals? We will also examine how resistance to political and cultural change during the 1960's have influenced the conservative political and cultural movements that have flourished in the years since.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 388. Field Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Field experience in organizations, institutions, and service agencies under such University of Michigan programs as the Washington and New York Internship Program and Project Community. Students must make individual arrangements with these programs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American Studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of instructor

Amer. Cult. 410. Hispanics in the United States.

Section 001 Women in Prison: Gender and Crime Among Blacks and Latinas in the U.S. Meets with Women's Studies 483.001

Instructor(s): Christina José-Kampfner (carino@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course you will learn about women in prison. This course will focus on the oppression that these women experience before, during, and after incarceration. Interviews will be scheduled with women at the prison which will be the basis for a final paper. The approach for these papers will utilize the Human Science perspective. As we study the experiences of these women as they participate in their existence we will use abstract categories and scientific constructs to analyze their experiences. Requirements: (a) midterm and final paper; (b) class participation; (c) reaction papers; (d) class presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 422. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 323 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is aimed at giving students with conversational ability in Ojibwa the opportunity to both improve their speaking and listening skills and to introduce them to Ojibwa literature, and the various dialects represented in the literature. Students will work with the original, unedited texts, as well as with edited, re-transcribed materials, and thus learn about the problems of working in a language without a standard widely accepted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of department required

Amer. Cult. 423. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 422 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 422.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of department required

Amer. Cult. 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. A grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of instructor and Honors concentrator in American Culture

Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Ethnic Entrepreneurship As Urban History. (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Kenneth Brown (krbrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course chronicles ethnic entrepreneurship in the urban community. African American entrepreneurship is the primary focus with attention to Latino, Asian, and European immigrant groups as well. This seminar course will: explore the concept of entrepreneur; give an overview of minority entrepreneurs beginning from America's earliest entrepreneurs to the present; explore models that seek to explain minority entrepreneurship; study history of government policies and programs related to minority entrepreneurship; and look at traditional and emerging minority businesses and their communities. Requirements: readings, weekly e-mail journal, midterm papers, final paper/project. The course pack is available from Michigan Documents. This course has an optional oral history component by permission of instructor for an additional two credit hours.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 Medicine and Health in U.S. Culture Since 1875. (4 Credits). Meets with History 396.003

Instructor(s): Martin Pernick (mpernick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 396.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of instructor

Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 003 Court Narratives: Gender and Justice in the U.S. (4 Credits). Meets with History 396.004

Instructor(s): Carol Karlsen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 396.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of instructor

Amer. Cult. 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Reconstructing U.S. Literature, 1865-1900. (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Gonzalez

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will examine the conditions of writing U.S. literature after the Civil War. How did authors respond to the task of rebuilding a sense of what the United States meant in literary terms, and in the aftermath of conditions which suggested that no national literature existed before the War? How did African Americans and other people of color write themselves into the history and rights of a nation that had until recently deny their very humanity? How did writers cope with the increasing professionalization of their once-genteel profession, and to the new realities of urban life and class struggle? How did women challenge the gendered division of public and private in their writings? How did the fact of Empire shape literature and national identity? Emphasis will be upon examining the historical conditions which influenced the making of U.S. literature in this period. Course requirements will include a significant research paper, classroom participation, and weekly response papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 Politics of Language and Latino/a Identity. (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Frances Aparicio (franapar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores language and bilingualism as sites for defining and reconceptualizing cultural identity among Latinos/as in the United States. Through poetry, prose, essays, and testimonies written by Latino/a writers, students will delve into the political meanings of using Spanish, English, and code-switching in literature and in daily life. Issues such as the role of language in creating a cultural identity, the practice of code-switching and bilingualism, the dialects between orality and written texts, and the power dynamics related to bilingualism and the use of Spanish in the United States will be explored. The course is interdisciplinary in its approach and will include readings in literature, sociolinguistics, education, politics, and cultural studies. Course requirements include essays and take home exams. Reading knowledge of Spanish is essential.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 12:38 PM on Thu, Mar 25, 1999.