Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in Chinese (Division 339)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for Chinese.


Note: The Department Waitlist policy for all courses is 2 Go to the department office to get on a waitlist, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.

Students wanting to begin language study, at a level other than first year, must take a placement exam to be held on Tuesday, January 5, 1-3 p.m.


Chinese 101. Beginning Chinese.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Hilda Tao (htao@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Native or near-native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/chinese/program.html

Chinese 101 is an introductory course for students who do not understand or speak any Chinese. (If you speak Chinese at home, this is not the right course for you. Take the placement exam in the fall for Chinese 301/302.) In this course, students are expected to achieve control of the sound system (especially the four tones), basic sentence patterns, aural comprehension, and daily conversations. Starting with the fourth week, students will learn to read and write the "traditional" Chinese characters (Fan-ti zi). Students will learn 100 characters in Chinese 101. Almost every week, students will be required to do their homework at the computer sites and will be required to perform skits in front of the class. A written quiz or test will be given every Thursday. Class is held one hour per day: Tuesdays and Thursdays are lectures; Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays are recitations. Students are required to register for both a lecture section and a recitation section. Attendance will be taken everyday. Textbooks: (a) John DeFrancis, Beginning Chinese (Yale Univ. Press); (b) John DeFrancis, Beginning Chinese Reader, Part I and II (Yale Univ. Press). Materials covered: Beginning Chinese, Lessons 1-13. Beginning Chinese Reader, Lessons 1-12. No visitors are allowed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 201. Second-Year Chinese.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Laura Grande (lsgrande@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 102. Native or near-native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/chinese/program.html

Students electing Chinese 201 should have mastered the spoken language material presented in DeFrancis' Beginning Chinese or a similar introductory text and should be able to recognize and write about 400 characters and 1200 combinations. The goals of Chinese 201 are (a) to dramatically improve spoken and aural competence and (b) to achieve a solid level of reading with a vocabulary of at least 900 characters and accompanying combinations. These goals are approached through relentless classroom drills, in-class and out-of-class exercises, and regular use of language tapes. Students are graded on the basis of rigorous written tests and quizzes, regular oral presentations, and daily attendance. The text is Intermediate Reader of Modern Chinese (Princeton University Press, 1992), Lessons 1-11. No visitors are allowed. (If you speak Chinese at home, this is not the right course for you. Take the placement exam in the fall for Chinese 302.) Students with especially strong oral skills should, and may be required to, register for Recitation Section 007.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Chinese 225. Calligraphy.

Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 101. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/chinese/program.html

To explore the richness of Chinese calligraphy, this course is designed to include a series of fundamental introductions to the history of Chinese calligraphy and a brief theoretical framework for evaluation and appreciation; in addition, a practice session will be held in each class to facilitate a hands-on learning process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 263/Philosophy 263/Asian Studies 263. Introduction to Chinese Philosophy.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Philip Ivanhoe (ivanhoe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Philosophy 263.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Chinese 301. Reading and Writing Chinese.

Language Courses

Section Permission of instructor required

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test and permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Chinese 101, 102, or 361. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/chinese/program.html

This course is designed for students with native or near-native speaking ability in Chinese, but little or no reading and writing ability. Chinese 301 focuses on reading and writing Chinese and will cover the regular 101-102 reading materials. Students will be graded on the basis of daily classroom performance, daily quizzes, periodic tests, and homework assignments. Students must have the permission of the instructor in order to register for this class. Most students will receive this permission via the placement exam to be held on Tuesday, September 7 at 1pm.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Chinese 405. Third-Year Chinese.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Hsin-hsin Liang (hliang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 202 or 362. (5). (Excl).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/chinese/program.html

Chinese 405 and 406 comprise a two-term sequence that makes up the third year of study in the Chinese program. All four basic skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) are stressed. In Chinese 405, along with structured grammatical patterns, students primarily learn the strategies and skills required for reading Chinese newspapers. The textbook in Chinese 405 is A New Text for a Modern China. In Chinese 406, students learn to read various styles and genres of modern Chinese, including fiction, essays, and occasionally poetry. Course readings are selected from a large variety of genuine Chinese materials; there is no textbook. On completing third-year Chinese, students should (with the aid of a dictionary) be able to read and discuss most non-technical subjects in modern Chinese. Both 405 and 406 meet five hours per week. Of these, three hours are devoted to understanding and discussing the reading material. The fourth hour is reserved for oral presentations, discussions, and skits. The fifth hour is used for taking quizzes or tests. Student work is evaluated on the basis of daily attendance, exercises, one dictation every second day, and one quiz or test per week. The class is conducted mainly in Chinese.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Chinese 416. Chinese for the Professions.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Qinghai Chen (chenq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 406. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/chinese/program.html

Chinese for the Professions (Business Chinese) focuses on practical language skills that are most helpful in actual business interactions with Chinese-speaking communities. Classroom activities, largely in the form of real world simulation, will be based on authentic documents and correspondence as well as a textbook. Some highlights are: business negotiation in international trade, business letter writing, business documents comprehension/translation, business oral presentation, commercial language, and word processing. Through intensive practice in the listening, speaking, reading, and writing of the Chinese language for business purposes, students will enhance their cultural awareness and acquire vocabulary, phrases, and sentence patterns commonly used in typical Chinese business contexts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Chinese 419. Computational Chinese.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Qinghai Chen (chenq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 202. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Computers and the Internet are rapidly becoming an important part of Chinese culture. Chinese, after English, is now the most widely used language on the Internet. At the same time, however, processing the Chinese language on a computer and applying various software packages in a Chinese environment remain to be a big challenge. That is why a course is desirable to provide training on Chinese language use in an electronical environment. Chinese 419 will cover language use in four computer applications, namely, Chinese word processing, Chinese e-mail, Power Point presentations in Chinese, and creation of Chinese web pages. Although involving training in computer skills, it will still primarily be a language course because the requirements and activities will emphasize all the aspects of language use listening, speaking, reading ,and writing The instructional strategy of the course will emphasize collaborative learning. Students will work in pairs or teams for the two major projects. Throughout the term, peer feedback will be abundant in frequent group discussions. There are no written exams. Grades are based on successful completion of homework and project assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 451. Literary Chinese.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Rolston (drolston@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 202 or 362. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Literary Chinese is the gateway to the vast treasures of Chinese literature, history, and culture. One cannot really come to know traditional China, or even modern China, without the ability to read literary Chinese. It is the language for the overwhelming majority of whatever was written in Chinese from the very beginnings to this century. Although there are some similarities and continuities between literary and modern Chinese, a class of this type is really necessary to help you open up the riches that lie waiting there. The class is designed to serve the needs of both undergraduate and graduate students, of both specialists (and would-be specialists) and those who are just curious about the Chinese literary heritage. Reading materials include a textbook, An Introduction to Literary Chinese, and handouts especially picked to reinforce the material in the textbook. Even in just this first half of a two-term sequence, the student will be introduced to many famous works of Chinese literature, the kind of pieces that have been memorized and chanted by Chinese down through the ages. There are brief weekly exercises, as well as a midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 461. Readings in Modern Chinese.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Qinghai Chen (chenq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 406. (5). (Excl).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Chinese 461-462 is a two-term Chinese language course sequence with graded readings at an advanced level. Texts chosen from a variety of sources in both Mainland China and Taiwan include 20th-century fiction and essays on various topics. While students are helped to further improve command of structure and vocabulary in a range of language styles, the primary emphasis of the sequence is on reading comprehension with the aim of enabling students to read original materials with less reliance on a dictionary. Development of speaking and writing skills will also be stressed through discussions on the readings. In the second term, longer texts will be used, and efforts will be made to improve reading skills and speed. At times when Chinese 431-432 (Contemporary Social Science Text) is not offered simultaneously, a social science component may be arranged to accommodate to the wider interest and demand of students. Daily attendance, weekly assignments and quizzes as well as unit tests are required. There is no final exam. Classes are conducted largely in Chinese.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Chinese 471/Asian Studies 471. Classical Chinese Literature in Translation.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese required. (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Largely through lectures, this course will examine the highlights of early Chinese literature from antiquity to the 13th century. We will begin with The Book of Changes, The Book of Songs, and a few ancient philosophical texts (which are written in brilliant literary styles) from the millennium before Christ, the millennium in which China made an astonishing "philosophical breakthrough" in its civilization. We will then undertake to follow the development of the various forms of poetry, fiction, and other kinds of prose during the subsequent centuries. The principal aim is to enable students to become familiar with, and also to be able to enjoy, these masterpieces of literature that illustrate the range and depth of the Chinese imagination, the inner life of the individual as well as the outer social and political life of China through the ages. Three 5-page papers and a final exam are required. Sample readings include Cyril Birech, ed., Anthology of Chinese Literature, Vol. I; two major texts in Taoist mysticism: Tao Te Ching and the "Inner Chapters" of the Chuang Tzu; Burton Watson, The Columbia Book of Chinese Poetry; and other materials in a course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Chinese 476/Asian Studies 476/RC Hums. 476. Writer and Society in Modern China.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Rolston (drolston@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese is required. (4). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an invitation to study examples of twentieth-century Chinese literature, a literature produced during a period of historical upheaval and itself a battleground for political, cultural, and aesthetic issues. But we also want to understand and appreciate the artistry and diversity of these literary works. We will examine: external "reality" as projected by our texts; ideological pressures of a shifting political context; the influx of Western influences and the breakdown of tradition; changing views of gender and sexuality; the role and self-conception of the writer as avant-garde rebel, historical witness, social critic, or political martyr, particularly in confronting the oppressed "other" as woman or peasant. What is the purpose or meaning of writing? Given the often fatal risks involved, why write? Readings will include stories by Lu Xun, Family (Ba Jin), Rickshaw (Lao She), "Miss Sophie's Diary" (Ding Ling), etc., examples of Communist "revolutionary literature", some stories from Taiwan. The second half of the term will deal with post-Mao works, as writers "rethink" themselves and the Communist revolution, search for cultural roots, explore issues of sexuality and subjectivity, experiment with new techniques. Class format: lecture/discussion. Requirements: three short papers, a final exam. No knowledge of Chinese required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Chinese 510. Interpreting the Analects.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Philip Ivanhoe (ivanhoe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chinese 452. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an upper-level course requiring advanced reading knowledge of classical Chinese, other East Asian languages also helpful but not required. This course explores selected commentaries on the Analects (Lunyü) from different periods in Chinese history beginning with the earliest extant commentary by He Yan et al. and extending down to 20th-century commentators. This is an upper-division, graduate-level course requiring advanced reading knowledge of Classical Chinese. Reading knowledge of Japanese and Korean is helpful but not required.

We will learn how to read the particular genre of classical commentary and explore the philosophical and hermeneutic presuppositions of different and influential commentators on the Analects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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