Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in English 124 (Division 361)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for English.


A complete up to date listing of English Department course descriptions can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/.

For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department (764-6330).

WRITING COURSES:

After taking or placing out of Introductory Composition, students may elect either English 224 or 225 for further practice in the fundamentals of expository and argumentative prose. English 325 offers the opportunity for work in argumentative and expository prose at a more advanced level.

Several sections of English 223, the beginning course in creative writing, are available each term. The work is multi-generic, and two of the following will be covered in each section: fiction, poetry, and drama, or you may take English 227 (Introductory Playwriting). A more advanced course for creative writers is English 323 (Fiction or Poetry), which is available after completion of the prerequisite, English 223. More experienced writers may apply for admission to specialized sections of English 327 (Playwriting), English 423 (Fiction), English 427 (Advanced Playwriting), and English 429 (Poetry). Admission to these advanced courses is by permission of the instructor, who may require writing samples.


Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jee Yoon Lee (jeeylee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kirsten Herold (fogh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 004 Reading and Writing about Gender and Genre

Instructor(s): Mona Bachmann (monabach@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is a man? What is a woman? How do writings in a number of genres represent, construct, and question the category of gender? Students will practice skills in critical thinking, close reading, and argumentative and expressive writing through intensive engagement with a variety of texts dealing with issues of masculinity and femininity, male and female roles, and identity. Examining fiction, essays, memoir, poetry, and drama, we will look at a wide range of interpretations and representations of this social category. Students will write 4-5 short papers, complete a number of informal writing assignments, and participate in class discussion about readings. Texts may include Virginia Woolf, Orlando; Tom Spanbauer, The Man who Fell in Love with the Moon; Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body; Kate Bornstein, Gender Outlaw; essays by Jay Prosser, Gayle Rubin, Judith Butler, Will Roscoe, and Freud; and poetry by Walt Whitman, Marlon Riggs, and Judy Grahn.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Bradley Kodesh (bkodesh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Writers constantly evoke other worlds as they remember them to have been or imagine them to be. Our primary goals in this class will be to think more analytically about the worlds presented to us in a wide range of texts and to communicate more effectively our observations about them, skills which will serve you well throughout your college career and beyond. To this end, the course will focus on the skills of critical reading and writing. We will emphasize the principles of writing and revising essays, the organization of ideas and argumentation, and the use of appropriate grammar and style. We will read literature of various genres and time periods, and you will be encouraged to try new things, take risks and expand your breadth as a writer and your acuity as a reader. Requirements will include reading (a wide range of texts, poetry as well as prose), writing (various drafts of four papers, a journal, other short assignments), participating (in class discussions and group workshops), and thinking (constantly).

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 006 Language/Logic

Instructor(s): Karin Spirn (kspirn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What can we learn about about a person based on the way he or she speaks, writes, and reasons? Does language reflect a person's identity, or does it mask it? In this course, we will attempt to answer these questions by examining texts that explore people's use of language. Students will also examine their own use of language and reasoning in their written assignments. The goal of the course will be to develop strong academic writing skills and critical reading skills. We will read texts from a variety of genres novels, poems, plays, short stories, and essays that will help us examine and question the structure and language of our own essay writing. Authors may include J.D. Salinger, Alice Walker, David Mamet, and others. By the end of the term you can expect to have completed 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 007 The Art of Persuasion

Instructor(s): Heather Brown (brownh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This composition class uses the study of literature to aid us in our approach to writing sophisticated, polished prose and helps to develop our ability to think analytically. In this course we will read some of literature's greatest moments of persuasion: Romeo's attempt to persuade Juliet to kiss him, Satan's ability to persuade Eve in Paradise Lost, or Swift's proposal that eating children might alleviate social ills (to name only a few). How does a writer persuade (or deceive) us into loving what we would otherwise detest, and detesting what we anally love. How does persuasion "work"? You will learn to write persuasively in this course by learning to improve your sense of audience, tone, voice, and style (among other features of writing). We will write in every class meeting, turn in weekly assignments, and learn to revise your work. By the end of the term you can expect to have completed 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Gene Laskowski (point@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 009, 038 Narrative, Argument, and Suspense

Instructor(s): Sara Rubinstein (srubinst@umich.edu), Grace Glass (gglass@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Good writing depends on asking good questions, and making these questions interesting to your reader. It's also crucial to keep the reader's attention as you provide compelling answers. Powerful writing does these things by creating suspense, revealing information gradually, and withholding it at the right moments. Many narratives or arguments lead up to a final revelation, a climax, but a non-linear, even fragmented structure can be just as fascinating. Creating a compelling academic argument often involves the same processes as writing a suspenseful narrative. In this class, we'll explore the various ways in which writers create and hold their readers' interest, and students will work towards different understandings of how structure creates meaning. We'll read some classic suspense narratives, which may include stories by A. Conan Doyle, Poe, Wharton, and Shirley Jackson. We may also study Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and/ or Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express. By the end of the term you can expect to have completed 20-30 ages of revised, polished prose.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Jeff Buchanan (jmbuchan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course foregrounds literature; however, it is a course about writing. Hence, we will make use of literary works to facilitate discussions of issues of writing. We will read novels and stories that reflect on childhood and adolescence and that bring questions of race, class, and identity to the surface. You will then be asked to write on similar topics. Expectations for written work include: two 5-7 page essays, two 3-5 page essays, and at least ten 1 page papers. You will also be asked to keep a reading journal. Reading might include Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, Kaye Gibbon's Ellen Foster, stories by Sandra Cisneros and Mark Richard, and William Faulkner's Absalom Absalom.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Chris Matthews (cmatt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 013 The City and the Country: Explore Places in Literature

Instructor(s): Madeleine Vala (mvala@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How are places important in literature and why should we care about setting? This course will explore the way various places both rural and urban, American and British function in late-nineteenth and twentieth-century texts. I hope to explore primarily the differences between the rural community and the bustling metropole: What are the experiences of the individual in each of these settings? How are places defined by the communities that inhabit them? To what extent does place itself become a character? From William Faulkner's depiction of Mississippi to James Joyce's portrayal of Dublin, literary places will provide the framework for you to improve your writing. Beginning on the level of word choice and sentence structure, we shall move in stages towards our ultimate goal: argumentative literary analysis. Texts may include Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio, James Joyce's Dubliners; short stories by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Oscar Wilde, and Flannery O'Connor; and poetry by Frank O'Hara and T.S. Eliot. Active participation is required. By the end of the term you will have written 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 014.

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 016 Images of Rural America

Instructor(s): Jean Borger

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In a society whose population has shifted ever more to urban centers, what accounts for our culture's fascination with rural scenes of plenty and deprivation, comedy and tragedy, hope and despair? What can be learned from a survey of twentieth-century representations of rural Americans and their communities as seen in literature, film, music, television, photography, and visual art? Taking these questions as a thematic basis, this course will focus on developing and honing the reading and writing skills that will take you through college and beyond. We will address questions of structure, purpose, audience, voice, authority, and style in an effort to discover how writing works, what makes it capable of arousing deep feelings and communicating complex thoughts and ideas. In considering our own texts, our focus will be on the evolution of writing how it grows and changes when we place ourselves, both imaginatively and literally, in a community of writers. Requirements: four formal papers (ranging from two to ten pages), critiques of other students' writing, and short, informal response papers.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 017.

Instructor(s): Josh Lavetter-Keiden (jkeidan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 019, 066 Literature and Loss

Instructor(s): Rebecca Egger (egger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 020.

Instructor(s): Tim Murnen (murnen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 021.

Instructor(s): Bill Hogan (wph@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 022.

Instructor(s): Cari Carpenter (carimc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 023.

Instructor(s): Scott Heath (rsheath@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 024 Thinking About Gender

Instructor(s): Susanna Ryan (seryan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this introductory writing course, we will focus on the skills needed for literary analysis: constructing thesis statements; developing arguments; and reading textual language and imagery closely and analytically. The central thematic concern in this class will be literary representations of gender roles, both masculine and feminine. We will look at the ways gender is constructed in different historical contexts and literary forms, and we will trace the portrayal of intimate relationships, both same-sex and heterosexual, from the Renaissance to the present day. Our readings will thus naturally be drawn from a number of different literary genres and time periods, and might include a Shakespearean play such as As You Like It, a nineteenth-century novel (The Woman in White or Dracula), a series of love sonnets, fairy tales, and a contemporary work of fiction, most likely The Color Purple. In exploring the forms and functions of literature, we may also watch and analyze a film version of one of the novels we read, in an attempt to understand both the limitations and the virtues of the written narrative. Course requirements include energetic class participation, a series of response papers, and four analytical essays ranging from three to seven pages in length.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 025 Public and Private Spaces

Instructor(s): Amanda Watson (alwatson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What separates personal spaces our homes, the inner space of memory from the world at large? Why is a "sense of place" important for so many writers? Through readings centered around questions like these, this course will introduce you to writing about literature. We'll visit writers' private spaces (Annie Dillard's Cabin, Virginia Woolf's Room of One's Own) and public landscapes (Joan Didion's L.A., Stuart Dybek's Chicago). In the process, we will find models for our own writing; we will discover how to "translate" the raw materials of our personal experience including our responses to literature into words, and eventually into finished work that we can be proud to show others.

You can expect to undertake four formal writing assignments for a total of around 25 pages of revised prose. In-class workshops and informal assignments will take you through the writing process and encourage you to become self-aware readers and revisers.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 026.

Instructor(s): Theresa Braunschneider (tbraun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The reading and writing assignments for this course will be unified by the theme of revision. In our readings, we will examine literary texts (including novels, plays, and poetry) that have been re-envisioned, reimagined, or recontextualized either by their original authors or by others. These readings will include well-known pieces of literature such as Shakespeare's King Lear, Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Austen's Emma, and Brontë's Jane Eyre as well as texts and films that reimagine them. Some of the revisions we read (or view) will pay homage to the originals, some will wage critique, others will parody. Over the course of the term, we will use these examples to consider the nature of revision: what it means to see a story or text anew; what remains of the original in the response; why some attempts seem more successful or interesting than others. At the same time, as we focus together on the demands of college-level writing, we will concentrate in students' own writing on the process of revision, a process which involves paying careful attention to the ideas you've committed to paper and working to see them from new perspectives, to push them in different directions, or simply to articulate them in more clear and nuanced ways. Course requirements will include regular attendance and participation, careful preparation of reading assignments, various in-class writing exercises, and several papers ranging in length from three to eight pages each which will, of course, go through multiple stages of revision over the course of the term.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 027.

Instructor(s): Colleen O'Brien (mmajomo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 028.

Instructor(s): Alyson Tischler (alysont@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 029.

Instructor(s): Eben Wood (ebone@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 030.

Instructor(s): Shawn Christian (shawnac@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 031 Bearing Witness: Dramas of Self and History

Instructor(s): Angela Balla (aballa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As accounts of both a self-in-transformation and history-in-the-making, acts of witness call into question what it means to "tell the truth." How do witnesses attempt to authorize their performances of conviction? What possibilities of "authentic" voice do conventions of truth-telling make available or foreclose? And what counts as "evidence" of an "event," either for the witness or for us as readers? In this class we will investigate the practice of persuasion across genres as well as historical periods: likely texts include Sophocles' Antigone, a Renaissance heresy trial, Shakespeare's Measure for Measure, Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior, World War II internment narratives, and Carolyn Forche's poetry of revolution. Course assignments will enable you to explore a range of analytical voices as well as argumentative postures, and include four formal, revised essays (varying in length from three to eight pages), regular reading responses, and occasional creative pieces (in the form of dramatic scripts, news reports, and legal documents).

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 032.

Instructor(s): Julia Carlson-Federhofer (jcarlson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 034 The Art of Interpretation

Instructor(s): Valarie Moses (mosesvj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will read works of literature which deal with interpreting a culture, locale, and/or group of people to a "larger" audience. Readings will include short stories, poems, and novels by such nineteenth and twentieth century writers as Henry James, Charles Chesnutt, Sarah Orne Jewett, Kate Chopin, Paul Laurence Dunbar, James Whitcomb Riley, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, and Amy Tan. We will use this literature to help you think about and practice writing as an act of interpretation. Writing assignments will be based on close readings of a text, but should also integrate outside resources and engage in the broader issues raised by a reading. Assignments will include one-page response papers to all of the reading assignments, two 4 to 6 page papers and two 5 to 7 page papers. You will also be expected to revise at least two of your longer papers and to participate actively in class discussions.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 035.

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 036 War and Heroes

Instructor(s): Su Fang Ng (ngsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What makes a hero? How do we reconcile our modern aversion to war and our continuing love for heroes? We will read literary depictions of the Trojan war and twentieth-century wars (focusing mainly on the Vietnam war) to compare and to contrast classical and modern ideas about war. Texts may include Homer's Iliad, Euripedes' Trojan Women, Tim O'Brien's In the Lake of the Woods, and a film (for instance, The Deer Hunter). We will consider how we know what we know and how we make meaning out of language in both the texts we read and in the writing we produce. As an introduction to college-level writing, the course emphasizes analytical thinking, critical reading, and writing argumentative essays. You will write five formal essays, which will be peer-reviewed in workshops. Other requirements are informal responses to the readings, in-class exercises, a class presentation, and active class participation.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 037.

Instructor(s): Maureen McDonnell

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 038 Narrative, Argument, and Suspense

Instructor(s): Sara Rubinstein (srubinst@umich.edu), Grace Glass (gglass@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.009.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 039 Not for Bedtime: Storytelling in African-American Literature

Instructor(s): LaTissia Mitchell (latissia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Who tells stories? To whom? Why are they told? How do we analyze stories written by others? These are some of the questions we will answer in this composition course. We will use storytelling as a critical approach to the audience, content and form of writing. African-American literature is a rich source of stories in a variety of forms (folktales, fiction, plays, and poetry) from which we will draw. Our readings will include stories from Charles Chesnutt and Zora Neale Hurston, and more contemporary works such as Edwidge Danticat's Krik? Krak! and Ntozake Shange's for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf. While there will be much spirited discussion of the readings, our main focus will be the writing process itself. You will complete weekly reader responses (one to two pages) examining major themes, characterizations, and writing styles of the literature; four formal, revised essays (from three to eight pages); and several in-class writing exercises. By the end of this course you should be able to write more clearly and confidently, and with increased complexity, about a range of texts and ideas.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 040.

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 041 Exploring the Mysterious in Our Worlds, in Ourselves

Instructor(s): Krista Homicz (khomicz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Are you fascinated by the mysterious? How can we begin to talk about the mysterious events or occurrences that happen in the world around us, or about the mysterious feelings that you find in yourself? Join our discussion as we test our perceptions of reality and analyze our views of the unreal. We're going to investigate the unusual settings, strange characters, surreal events, and fantastic images conjured up by writers from different cultures and time periods. And, hopefully, in developing our ability to interpret the mysterious in literature through class discussions, we can find ways to interpret the mysterious in ourselves and our worlds in our own writing. For this journey into the mysterious, we will read and discuss a mix of literary genres which touch upon the peculiar, the unknown, or the supernatural. Some readings may stem from legends and folktales from African, Asian, Celtic, Mayan, and Native American folklore. Most of the readings will be from a selection of short stories with mysterious twists and problems (which may include Barth's Lost in the Funhouse, Poe's The Fall of the House of Usher, Borges' Pierre Menard, Author of Don Quixote, or others by Camus, Márquez, Hawthorne, Welty, Silko, and Wharton), and a few novels by authors who write about mysterious presences in different cultures (which may include Carlos Fuentes in Aura, Toni Morrison in Beloved, Henry James in The Turn of the Screw, and Maxine Hong Kingston in The Woman Warrior). Our writing and analysis will speculate on the social and psychological implications found within these works (for example, what our fears tell us about ourselves, and how we explain or understand the mysterious in our lives). Be prepared to share your thoughts and your writing with other students so that we can consider what you and other students find mysterious and fascinating. Course requirements include reading, participating actively in class discussion and collaborative discussion and writing work, writing in-class and out-of-class responses to reading, and writing and revising four formal papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 042 Crisis in Writing

Instructor(s): Apollo Amoko (aamoko@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is good writing? What assumptions regarding context, appropriateness, and effectiveness have to be in place before we can begin to answer this question? This course will use a diverse range of texts addressing both real and fictional crises in an attempt to come to terms with this question. What rhetorical choices do writers employ in order to convey a sense of crisis (both real and imagined)? Our working hypothesis will be that the effectiveness of any writing is more a function of its rhetorical force than its specific substantive content (as important and compelling as that content may be). My goal will be to provide you with a sense of the range of choices available to you in your own writing. The writers to be studied will include Jonathan Swift, Flannery O'Connor, Joy Kogawa, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Franz Fanon, Stanley Fish, and William Safire. You can expect to write 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose by the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 046, 047.

Instructor(s): Lauren Kingsley (kiwirosa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Among the many types of stories out there in literature-land, the ones we best relate to often have as their subject the messy business of growing up. "Literary types" call this the "coming of age" motif, and it's this which we will be exploring in our reading of not-what-you'd-expect novels, stories, memoir, and drama. Many, but not all, of these selections share the setting of student life, something which we should relate to even more. We will be journaling our responses to the readings, writing several one to two page pieces, and completing a variety of non-traditional assignments, but emphasis will be on developing reading and writing skills so that when we enter into each literary experience, we have with us a full kit of tools with which to talk about it. To that end a 3-5 page paper, a 5-7 page paper, and one 10-page paper will also be required.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 053 Film and Society

Instructor(s): Alan Howes (ahowes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will view eight films by major directors, all of which deal with political or social issues, as the basis for discussion and writing. The earliest film is D.W. Griffith's Intolerance (1916), the latest, Akira Kurosawa's Rhapsody in August (1991). Other directors and films include: Charles Chaplin, Monsieur Verdoux; John Ford, The Grapes of Wrath; Orson Welles, Citizen Kane; Stanley Kubrick, Dr. Strangelove; Francis Ford Coppola, Apocalypse Now; and David Lean, A Passage to India. We will also read some of the sources for these films. Frequent writing with opportunities for revision. Paper topics will be drawn both from the films themselves (e.g., the styles of different directors), and from some of the issues they deal with.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 066 Literature and Loss

Instructor(s): Rebecca Egger (egger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.019.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

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