Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in French (Division 371)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 – December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for French.


Instructions for students requesting overrides for French or Spanish 101, 103, 231, or 232.

  1. Try to find a section that will fit into your schedule, since the Department cannot guarantee every student a space in a section of his/her own choice.

    However, do not register for a class that you cannot attend. You will not be eligible to override into the section of your choice if you are registered for any section of 101-232, even if you cannot attend that section.
  2. As it states in the Time Schedule any registered student who misses one of the first four class meetings will be dropped from the course, thereby leaving some open spaces for those students who have been closed out.

    If there is absolutely no section open which will fit your schedule, you should follow this procedure:
    1. Start attending the section you would like to get into on the first day of class. You will receive a Proof of Attendance form which must be signed by your instructor every day. You must attend a class every day, but it does not need to be the same section. All students must take action through T-T Registration to make sure their official schedule of courses matches the courses they are taking.
    2. On Tuesday, September 14 at 7:00 p.m., there will be a meeting in the basement of the MLB, rooms to be announced later, for each of the above courses. At these meetings, students will be assigned to remaining vacated spaces in the most fair and equitable manner possible, using a lottery system. At no time, however, will any class be allowed to exceed 25 students. Students must bring their printout of classes and the Proof of Attendance form to the meeting!
  3. Please note that you will not be allowed to change sections at these meetings. Beginning Wednesday, September 15, Elementary French Language Supervisors will hear requests for section changes and fill those requests to whatever degree is possible.
  4. Please ensure when adding with the override that you also add modifiers for pass/fail, etc.

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school must take the Placement Test to determine the language course in which they should enroll. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction in high school. It is strongly recommended that students who began French at another college or university also take the placement test. Students must check with the Course Coordinator for any exceptions to the Placement Test level.

367/368/369 Introduction to French Literature.

The objective of this series of courses is to acquaint students with significant literary works and literary theories drawn from the entire range of French literature. Each work is analyzed (in French) individually for its own merit and is then placed within the context of its period. Students are asked to read carefully the assigned works, to reflect on them, and to express their reactions and ideas in class. The instructor holds class discussions, points out the artistic values of the work, and attempts in many cases to show the evolution of literature as it reflects various external factors. Grades may be based on discussions, papers, and a midterm and/or final examination.


French 101. Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s): Lara Mangiafico (lmangia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The sequence of French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture which are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials. Classes meet four hours per week in sections of 20-25 students. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. Students are required to use computer and video materials outside of class. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as one or more speaking tests and a final examination. Class participation is graded. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102 and 103.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 102. Elementary French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s): Lara Mangiafico (lmangia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See French 101. French 102 is the continuation of French 101. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H. Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 103. Review of Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

French 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in French 101/102. Entrance into the course is by placement or with the permission of the course coordinator. Because students are expected to be already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace, and students will need to plan on spending at least 8-10 hours each week preparing daily lessons. The objectives and methods of instruction are similar to those of French 101/102. Quizzes (with both oral and written components) are administered to check students' assimilation of material. There are three hourly exams, a final, compositions, and speaking tests. By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French (both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language. Students will also have a general knowledge of French-speaking cultures. Technology (multi-media, computer-based writing programs, the web) will be used to aid in acquiring listening and writing skills, and cultural competency.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 111. First Special Reading Course.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of French 111-112 does not satisfy the LS&A language requirement. May not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have received credit for college French. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is for undergraduate and graduate students who would like to gain a good reading knowledge of French in one term. The essentials of French grammar as well as vocabulary and idioms are presented for passive recognition, followed by translation and sight-reading exercises on materials taken from both humanities and sciences. The skills gained in the course should enable students to read technical writings of moderate difficulty. Toward the end of the term, students select a short article or a chapter of a book in their field of interest for outside reading. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 25 students. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students whose last French course was NOT at U of M Ann Arbor must take the placement test. French 231 builds and expands upon the work done in French 101/102 or French 103. The primary goals of French 231 are to:

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of CD-ROM activities, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 004 – Honors Section

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students whose last French course was NOT at UM–Ann Arbor must take the placement test. The sequence French 231/232 is built upon the work done in French 101/102. It presents intensive and comprehensive grammar review, study of finer points of French grammar structure, and the reading of journalistic prose, short stories, and literary excerpts. Both courses include the use of French movies and video. The proficiency gained by the end of French 232 should enable students to express themselves in French on subjects of intellectual interest, to understand conversation on such topics. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of grammar study, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as midterm and final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section.

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 004 – Contextual Communication or: Why the French use the words they do!

Instructor(s): Rachael Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Context dictates our communicative register: situation, interlocutor, and media all require understanding and an ability to adopt the necessary form of written, verbal, or listening communication. For example, when speaking during a job interview, would you use the same vocabulary, body language, tone of voice, or facial expressions that you would use with your best friend in a coffee shop? Definitely not, and neither would the French.

In this class, we will study a wide variety of communicative registers, ensuring that we can both understand and reproduce them in order to communicate efficiently and appropriately. As we will discover, a TV news presenter, for example, employs a precise set of vocabulary and communication techniques very different from a Music Video presenter; students will study the differences and recreate these examples with in-class skits.

During our studies, we will work to improve grammar by using Ensuite, applying our knowledge in presentations and written texts within the registers we have studied. The Internet will an invaluable tool as we study it's unique cyber-French. We will also study, discuss and produce our own versions of video, film, and TV clips.

The format will center around seven 2-week units:

Politics in France: history, current, recordings of speeches – students write and perform.
Business in France: etiquette, vocabulary, resume, job interview skits.
French Literature: short story/poem to study – students write in literary register.
Daily Life: food labels, operating instructions, recipes, schedules, etc.
Media: newspapers, magazines, radio, and TV.
Internet: Surfer le Web, discuss Americanization of French language.
Social Studies: religious language, entertainment industry

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 006 – Honors Section

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 009 – Self Expression and the Arts of the 20th Century

Instructor(s): Melinda Waterhouse (melinw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How have francophone speakers expressed themselves and their life stories through the arts of the twentieth century? Taking a chronological approach which will divide the twentieth century into three distinct periods (1900-44, 1945-67, and 1968-99), the course will offer a response to this question by concentrating on both visual and audio media such as literature, painting, film, and music. In addition to the actual artistic production of the artists chosen for each time period, we will read selections from autobiographical works (for example, letters, diaries, personal essays, and interviews) that directly address the artist's pursuit of self in his/her art. Finally, with the coming of the new millenium, the course will conclude with a discussion of the future of self-expression in the twenty-first century.

Beyond providing an introduction to artistic self-expression in the twentieth century, this course will enable students to develop reading, writing, and speaking skills commensurate with the level needed to satisfy completion of the language requirement in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 012 – Social Issues Through French Film

Instructor(s): Jarrod Hayes (hayesj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This topics section of French 232 will focus on social issues in contemporary French society such as marriage, the family, racism, gender relations, AIDS, sexuality, social marginalization, and homelessness. Every two weeks, there will be a film screening which will serve as the starting point for class discussions. Students will also be asked to find articles in French newspapers to complement the screenings. An emphasis will be placed on improving writing skills (including grammar) as well as speaking skills through class discussion.

Requirements: one typed 1.5-page paper per film, regular tests, midterm, and final.

Films: La cité des enfants perdus
Sans toit ni loi
La haine
Trop belle pour toi
J'ai pas sommeil
Subway

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001, 002 – Advanced Practice in French Through Contemporary Social Issues

Instructor(s): Yannick Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in French.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will be dealing with some of the issues and problems facing today's French/Francophone society through readings (press and textbook articles), videos (documentaries, news program exposes, film) and CDs:

This "cultural" approach will offer us a jumping-off point for oral and written communication (respectively 40% and 60% of the final grade): three individual oral presentations (30%), three medium-length essays (30%), and a number of written exercises (30%). Active class participation (10%) and regular attendance are expected. (Coursepack French 235, 2 vols., Viers) at Dollar Bill [611 Church Street, (734-665-9200)]; French Grammar Usage by Hawkins and Towell and a good bilingual dictionary (bookstores).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

French 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 003.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in French.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will be dealing with some of the issues and problems facing today's French/Francophone society through readings (press and textbook articles), videos (documentaries, news program exposes, film) and CDs:

This "cultural" approach will offer us a jumping-off point for oral and written communication (respectively 40% and 60% of the final grade): three individual oral presentations (30%), three medium-length essays (30%), and a number of written exercises (30%). Active class participation (10%) and regular attendance are expected. (Coursepack French 235, 2 vols., Viers) at Dollar Bill [611 Church Street, (734-665-9200)]; French Grammar Usage by Hawkins and Towell and a good bilingual dictionary (bookstores).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 244. Issues in Race and Cultural Diversity in the Francophone World.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frieda Ekotto (ekotto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

R&E First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we shall study cultural productions and social issues related to race, racism, and ethnicity in French-speaking societies. At one level of the course we shall discuss how discourses on race function within the general ideological state apparatuses that reproduce a given social order. In this connection we will also study the role of cultural diversity in the production and circulation of discourses of existing ideology. At another level we shall analyze how discourses on race, racism, and ethnicity are inscribed in the texts and films selected for the course. At issue here are the implication of cultural diversity in different parts of the Francophone world. Selected specific examples (of texts and films) will help us put in context our questioning on these issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – L'Art de voyager

Instructor(s): Melissa Waldman (mwaldman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Voyagers to the New World, out of this world, and to places around the world tell us about worlds invented and observed, as well as about themselves. We will examine where the travel narratives take us readers mentally and ideologically, as well as consider where we locate the narratives in relation to ethnography, utopian aspirations, history, and cultural critique. Can we identify characteristics that unify and distinguish travel narratives as a genre? What does travel – literally and metaphorically – make possible? Why does it appeal? Where does it go awry? We will use the travel narratives to get to discussions about the discovery of the New World, religious and industrial revolutions, colonization, morality, politics, and philosophy.

Readings and discussion will be in French. Evaluation will be based on class participation, one page reflections on each text, your own travel narrative, and two essays (four pages).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 – "Flânerie et Modernité" (Nineteenth-Century Cultural Construction of Paris)

Instructor(s): Viers Yannick (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Paris, the "Capital of the Nineteenth Century," will inspire our reading of a collection of graphic representations (literary and critical writings, caricatures, lithographies, architectural project, fashion prints, etc.) from the French Revolution to the Commune (1789-1871).

Through our "readings" we will investigate the impact of the political and industrial revolutions, the metropolis, the crowds, and other social phenomena on some Nineteenth-century cultural productions.

While "strolling" about these texts and their historical/economical/political contexts, we will also have the opportunity to reflect upon contemporary critical notions such as (post-) modernity, (urban) text, modern subjectivity, space, and power relations.

With the constant presence of twentieth-century critic Walter Benjamin, we will encounter a selection of works by Balzac, Barthes, Baudelaire, Daumier, Flaubert, Freud, Foucault, Hugo, LeBon, Maupassant, Michelet, Marx, Poe, Sand, Zola, etc.

Your grades will be based on two essays, three quizzes, written/oral reports, and active class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

French 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Yannick Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


French 272. French and Francophone Film, Media, and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Les films criminels, le film noir français, et la nouvelle vague. Required Screenings: Tuesdays 6-8pm

Instructor(s): Carina Yervasi (cly@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

American film noir and French gangster films both influenced the French New Wave (nouvelle vague), a gritty new emerging cinema in France in the late 1950s. In the New Wave, figures and icons of the underworld – criminal minds, gangsters, big cars, dark lighting, contraband, guns, even femmes fatales – significantly contribute to enriching the visual imagery and film technique as well as social commentary. Discussions and readings (in English and French) will center on themes from film noir and the development of French New Wave films. The course is offered in French.

Required Screenings: Tuesdays 6-8 pm

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


French 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


French 342. French and Francophone Film Taught in English.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 001 – New Wave French (in English). Required Screenings: Tuesdays 6-8pm

Instructor(s): Carina Yervasi (cly@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an in-depth exploration of the development and evolution of the French New Wave. We will concentrate on the history of the New Wave in France from the 1950s through the late 1960s by the close study of the styles of individual filmmakers, the "film movement" as perceived by critics, and the New Wave's contribution to international film culture. The primary emphasis will be on the stylistic, socio-political, and cultural dimensions of the New Wave, and the filmmakers and critics most closely associated with the movement: these include Chabrol, Godard, Truffaut, Rivette, Resnais, and Varda. This course is offered in English.

This course meets the National Cinema elective for concentrators in the Program in Film and Video Studies.

Required Screenings: Tuesdays 6-8pm

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 350. Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Modern Travel Narratives

Instructor(s): Alina Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Travel narratives whether by amateur travellers or professional ones (such as explorers, missionaries, or ethnographers) offer some of the best insights into inter-cultural communication and miscommunication. In this course we will examine a number of 20th-century French and Francophone narratives, in which the discoveries and misunderstandings of the other are particularly meaningful in terms of how the "metropolitan" French viewed, and were viewed in turn by their "provincial," "colonial" fellows. These ecounters reveal as much about collective ways of thinking, as they do about individual attitudes. The readings will consist of short pieces, excerpts from longer travel narratives, and journal articles by 20th-century writers such as, Segalen, Saint-John Perse, Larbaud, Gide, Breton, Cesaire, Leiris, Levi-Strauss, Dadie, Memmi, Pieyre de Mandiargues, Genet, Duras, Oyono, Le Clezio, Maryse Conde. Evaluation will be based on class participation and discussion, and two short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 366/MARC 386. Medieval Literature, History, and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

No Description Provided.

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French 368. Enlightenment, Revolution, and Romanticism.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Voyages in Space, Society, and Time

Instructor(s): William Paulson (wpaulson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the literature and culture of a crucial century and a half (roughly 1715 to 1851) in which France occupied the center stage of world history and its modern society and institutions came into being. Inspired by the rise of modern natural science and voyages to distant lands, writers of the Enlightenment produced a witty and disrespectful literature that criticized the customs, social structures, and beliefs of aristocratic society and the Church. Their ideas contributed to the great French Revolution of 1789, an epochal event in the creation of modern societies and politics. Its repercussions led succeeding generations in France to be preoccupied with history, time, loss, selfhood, and change – leading themes of what came to be known as romantic literature. Readings of short works by Voltaire, Madame de Graffigny, Bougainville, Diderot, Rousseau, Chateaubriand, Madame de Duras, Balzac, and others. Additional readings in French history, particularly of the Revolutionary period, and films on related historical subjects. Three short papers, one oral examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

French 370/RC Core 370. Advanced Proficiency in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 – Theater in French: Le Petit Prince

Instructor(s): Merielle Belloni (mbelloni@umich.edu), Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235 or RC Core 320. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Core 370.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 378. Studies in Genre.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – French Poetry As You Like It (La Poésie comme elle vous plaire)

Instructor(s): Ross Chambers

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Poetry, these days, tends to intimidate. Why? This course is partly about how modern French poetry has responded to its cultural marginalization in the modern world; and partly about why people who like poetry do like it. The assumption will be that there is no single correct way to read poetry but many different ways of enjoying it; and you will be invited to think about why and how you yourself derive pleasure from reading verse and poetic prose in French.

Rhyme and rhythm do not work the same in French as they do in English. There are also other structuring practices, in verse and in prose, that are common to poetry in all languages. It is helpful to have some understanding of how these work to make meanings, and we will begin by looking into them. Then we will try to put them into practice by writing some poetry of our own, individually and as a group; and finally we will read as much poetry together as we can, asking how and why it offers itself to us for our interest and pleasure. How does poetry enhance enjoyment of the world? But also: how does it express or imply criticism of a (disenchanted, unjust, alienating) modern world as it is?

Written work will consist of two papers of 3-5 pages in French: one appreciative of a poem, one discussing your own pleasure in poetry. The papers will be preceded by careful drafts. I'll ask you also to keep a diary in English of your poetry reading experiences. Grades will be based 50% on class participation and 50% on written work (diary and papers). Midterm by interview with instructor. The class is taught in French.

Textbooks (tentative list only):
Apollinaire, Alcools (Gallimard: Coll. "Poésie".
Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du Mal (Gallimard: Coll. "Poésie".
Claudel, Connaissance de l'Est (Gallimard: Coll. "Poésie".
Ponge, Le Parti pris des choses (Gallimard: Coll. "Poésie".
Réda, Les ruines de Paris (Gallimard: Coll. "Poésie".
Rimbaud, Poésies complètes (Livre de Poche)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 379. Studies in Gender and Sexuality.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Families: Stories of Sex and Violence

Instructor(s): David Caron (dcaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

If you were to choose between your family and your friends, who would you choose, and why? When is the family an oppressive structure? When is it a recourse against social and political oppression? What are the links between heterosexuality and capitalism? Is homosexuality inherently subversive? How are the private and the public spheres articulated, and for what purpose?

The focus of the course is the twentieth century and the modern family. In addition to short theoretical texts dealing with the construction of the modern bourgeois family, we will read a variety of literary texts that challenge existing models and/or propose alternative ones.

Tentative reading list includes authors such as Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Jean Cocteau, Emile Ajar, Heervé Guibert, Denis Lachaud, and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 384. Origins of Contemporary France: From the Gauls to de Gaulle.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Cultural History of France: From the Middle-Ages to the Revolution

Instructor(s): Rachael Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey of French civilization: literature, history, art, and society. We will discuss Romanesque and Gothic art, the role of women in medieval society, witchcraft and the Church, Reformation and Counter-Reformation, the centralization of power, and the emergence of absolutism. Slides and films will complement lectures, reading, and discussions of monuments, events, and social structures. Conducted in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 399. Independent Study.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232; permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Readings and topical studies relating to French-speaking cultures (in Europe, Africa, North America, and Indian Ocean) not addressed in other courses, as well as to aspects of French and Francophone culture that may require special treatment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 438/Rom. Ling. 456/EducationD 456. Topics in Learning and Teaching French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lara Mangiafico (lmangia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to present methods of teaching secondary level foreign languages. The course is designed for prospective middle and high school teachers who are competent in their language skills and now seek to focus that competency into a personal teaching style in a foreign language classroom. Issues such as curriculum development and instructional models of teaching will be addressed. Throughout the course, student will actively and reflectively practice their teaching skills in preparation for effective student teaching. Please note that this course should be taken by students enrolled in the teacher certification program at the school of Education, and preferably the term just prior to student teaching.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 450. Special Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – French and Francophone Women's Cinema

Instructor(s): Huet

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit.

No Description Provided.

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French 450. Special Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 – The French New Novel and Francophone Literature

Instructor(s): Jarrod Hayes (hayesj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on the challenges the French New Novel (le nouveau roman) brought to novelistic conventions such as linear narrative, the distinction between characters and objects, narrative time, and the omniscient narrator who is able to authorize a "true" version of a novel's events. In particular, we will consider how Francophone novels incorporated similar challenges, often to more political ends. Rereading the French New Novel through its Francophone parallels also allows readers to better understand the New Novel's frequent reproduction of colonial discourse. This course will begin with an exemplary New Novel from France and then move on to one of the most intricate novels of each of the four major Francophone regions. Special attention will be devoted to the practical issues of reading through the difficulties of many contemporary novels. We will also consider how questioning more conventional models of narrativity brings about a reconceptualization of the notions of identity, history, nationality, and gender. Graduate students are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course and will be asked to supplement the required readings with additional novels selected individually in consultation with the instructor.

Requirements: two papers, an on-going journal of reactions to the readings, a class presentation.

Novels:
La maison du rendez-vous, Alain Robbe-Grillet (France)
Nedjma, Kateb Yacine (Algeria)
La vie et demie, Sony Labou Tansi (Congo)
L'isolé soleil, Daniel Maximin (Guadeloupe)
French Kiss (in French), Nicole Brossard (Quebec)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 465. Literature of the Nineteenth Century.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Caron

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

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French 491. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

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French 492. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


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