Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in Philosophy (Division 442)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for Philosophy.


Philosophy is about as broad a subject as one can find in a university curriculum. It addresses a wide array of questions, some quite familiar (Does God exist? Why be moral? What is art?), others less so (What is a thing? Is space a substance?). Philosophy includes the examination of its own methods, and its own history. It also falls within philosophy to examine the methods and practices of virtually all academic disciplines. Because of this breadth, a person can study philosophy in ways involving the styles and techniques of thought of most other fields of inquiry. For example, the work of a philosopher concentrating in logic is much like that of the student of mathematics. A philosopher primarily interested in the philosophy of religion will often be doing much the same things as a theologian or a student of the history of religion. Political philosophy is regarded by some as including political activity itself. Many other such examples exist. In addition, Philosophy examines the practices of other activities, such as the fine arts, that are sometimes thought of as different from typical academic disciplines. However, for the most part the activities characteristic of philosophy are peculiar to the discipline. The only way to know what it's really like is to give it a try.

The Department offers a number of courses that do not carry prerequisites: (A) general introductions designed to acquaint students with a representative sample of philosophical problems (181, 202, 232, and 297); (B) introductions that focus on a particular area of philosophy or of human concern e.g., Chinese philosophy, physical science, or substantive moral problems designed for students who, having no previous background in philosophy, want to study these areas in a philosophical way (263, 320, and 355); and (C) introductions to logic and reasoning (180, 201, and 303, and 414).

(A) The general introductions deal, for example, with questions concerning the nature of reality, knowledge, the self and the mind, freedom, morality, society, and religion, but they differ in their instructional format and staffing. Philosophy 202 is taught by advanced graduate students in independent sections of 25 students. Philosophy 181 is taught by faculty, in a combination lecture/discussion format, limited to 50 students. In Philosophy 232, a faculty member delivers a lecture two hours per week, and students divide into groups of 25 for discussion sections led by graduate students. Finally, Philosophy 297, "Honors Introduction," is taught by a faculty member to a group of 25 students.

(B) Fall Term courses not carrying prerequisites, but that are more specialized than the general introductions, include "Chinese Philosophy" (263), "The World-view of Modern Science" (320), and "Contemporary Moral Problems" (355). These courses do not require previous work in philosophy. Philosophy 370 is taught by a member of the faculty, in a combination lecture/discussion format, limited to 30 students. In Philosophy 263 sand 355, a faculty member delivers a lecture two hours per week, and students divide into groups of 25 for discussion sections led by graduate students.

A number of Fall Term 300-level courses require only a single philosophy introduction as a prerequisite: "Language and Mind" (345), "Ethics" (361), "Existentialism" (371), and "History of Philosophy: Ancient" (388). Of these, 345, 361, and 388 meet requirements for the concentration.

(C) Among the introductions to logic, Philosophy 180 is designed both to improve critical reasoning skills, and to provide an introduction to formal logic. Philosophy 201 is designed to improve critical reasoning skills, through an introduction to informal logic. Philosophy 303 is an introduction to formal or symbolic logic. Philosophy 414 is a more advanced course in formal logic, and is approved for (QR/1). Philosophy 180 and 303 are taught by faculty, in a combination lecture/discussion format, limited to 50 students. Philosophy 201 is taught by advanced graduate student teaching assistants in independent sections of 25 students.

There is additional information about the Department's curriculum in "The Undergraduate Program in Philosophy." This brochure contains information intended for students interested in taking philosophy courses, whether or not they are considering a Philosophy concentration. The Department also maintains a home page (http://www.lsa.umich.edu/philosophy/). Students considering a concentration in Philosophy are encouraged to make an appointment with a Philosophy concentration advisor. To request a copy of the undergraduate brochure, or to schedule an appointment with a concentration advisor, contact the Department Office (2215 Angell Hall, 764-6285). The Office can also provide information about the Department's Undergraduate Philosophy Club and undergraduate e-mail group.


Philo. 180. Introductory Logic.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for only one of Phil. 180 or 201. (3). (HU). (BS).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed both to improve critical reasoning skills that could be of use in a wide range of disciplines and careers, and to provide an introduction to formal logic. The course examines some of the problems and fallacies which arise in informal reasoning, some of the elements of formal (symbolic) logic, and logical concepts used in the analysis and criticism of arguments. The course gives some attention to issues in branches of philosophy germane to logic, for example, the theory of knowledge, philosophy of language, and metaphysics. There will be lectures, demonstrations of problem-solving techniques, and a variety of exercises. The course is limited to 50 students, which should permit opportunity for discussion. Texts and methods of evaluation to be determined.

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Philo. 181. Philosophical Issues: An Introduction.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines some of the main problems of philosophy, such as:

Students will write papers discussing a number of these topics.

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Philo. 181. Philosophical Issues: An Introduction.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Walker

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a topical introduction to problems and issues central to the discipline of philosophy. Both modern and historical texts will be incorporated. Some areas to be considered include: ethics, political philosophy, philosophy of religion, metaphysics, and epistemology. Specific topics will include: arguments for and against the existence of God, the basis of the authority of government, the freedom of the will, personal identity, and skepticism about the external world. Evaluations will be based on two short essays, class participation, and a final in class exam.

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Philo. 196. First Year Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Philo. 196. First Year Seminar.

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Philo. 196. First Year Seminar.

Section 003 Introduction to Bioethics

Instructor(s): Rebecca Walker

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course serves as an introduction to bioethics. Topics covered will include issues in medical ethics, the ethics of our treatment of animals, and environmental ethics. Areas to be addressed include: conflicts of interest (for example, animal interests vs. human interests in medical experimentation), investigation of the basic concepts underlying bioethics (What are rights? Can animals have rights? What about the environment?), and the relationship between technology and bioethics (When, if ever, is a life not worth living? Are there limits to the influence that humans should have on nature?). Evaluations will be based on two short essays, class participation, and a final in-class exam.

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Philo. 201. Introduction to Logic.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for only one of Phil. 180 or 201. (3). (HU). (BS).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course aims to give students a thorough understanding of the fundamental forms of reasoning and rational argument, and to improve critical reasoning skills that could be of use in a wide range of disciplines and careers. The course examines some of the problems and fallacies which arise in informal reasoning and logical concepts used in the analysis and criticism of arguments. Some elements of formal (symbolic) logic might be introduced. Though students will be expected to master some technical detail, the course emphasizes informal logical techniques applicable to problem solving and argument in any area of inquiry. Both deductive and inductive patterns of argument will be examined. The small section size (25 students) is conducive to informality and considerable student participation. There will also be lectures, demonstrations of problem-solving techniques, and a variety of exercises. Normally, there are weekly assignments and short, periodic quizzes.

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Philo. 202. Introduction to Philosophy.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include: Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects? If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility? Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible? Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else? What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another? Are there good reasons for believing that God exists? How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves? In addressing these questions, some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers. Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers.

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Philo. 232. Problems of Philosophy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Joyce (jjoyce@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 181, 182, 202, 231, 234, or 297. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides undergraduates with a broad overview of modern philosophy. Topics to be covered will include at least some of the following.

Students will be asked to read about 30 pages of material per week, to write three 7-8 page papers, and to take a midterm examination and a cumulative final exam.

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Philo. 263/Asian Studies 263/Chinese 263. Introduction to Chinese Philosophy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Philip Ivanhoe (ivanhoe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on the major philosophical schools of Classical China (through the unification of China in 221 B.C.). Special consideration is given to the ethical, religious and political thought of the Confucian, Mohist, and Daoist schools. The doctrines associated with these early Chinese philosophical movements, along with Buddhism which came to China around the first century A.D., affected cultural developments in art, philosophy, religion, science, and politics throughout Chinese history. The course concentrates on the theories of human nature that were associated with these early Chinese thinkers and the ways in which these theories served as the foundation for their ethical, religious, and political views. No knowledge of Chinese is required. Readings are in translation. All students are required to write two 5-8 page papers, and a third, longer paper revising one of the two short papers.

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Philo. 296. Honors Introduction to Logic.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students or permission of instructor. Credit is granted for only one of Phil. 203, 303, or 296. (3). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

No Description Provided.

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Philo. 297. Honors Introduction to Philosophy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas Hofweber

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students or permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 181, 182, 202, 231, 232, or 234. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to philosophy, focusing on four major topics:

  1. Can the existence of God be proven? Can there be an all-powerful and good God in a world with suffering?
  2. Are we ever free? How, if at all, does freedom fit into a material world?
  3. Can we know that there is anything other than ourselves? Might the world around you just be an illusion, or a dream?
  4. Why, if at all, should you ever do something other than what is in your best self-interest? What is it to be a good person, and why should one care about being one?

Readings will be partly from major historical figures, and partly from contemporary authors. Evaluations will mostly be based on papers.

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Philo. 297. Honors Introduction to Philosophy.

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students or permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 181, 182, 202, 231, 232, or 234. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A thorough examination of selected philosophical problems.

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Philo. 297. Honors Introduction to Philosophy.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Ian Proops (iproops@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students or permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 181, 182, 202, 231, 232, or 234. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide an introduction to some of the problems and methods of contemporary philosophy through an examination of three central issues:

  1. The existence of God: Are there plausible arguments for the existence of God? How can the existence of an all-powerful, all-knowing, and loving Creator be reconciled with the existence of worldly evil?
  2. Mind and body: How is the mind related to the body? What is the nature of consciousness?
  3. Ethics: Are there any plausible principles governing how one ought to act? How could one go about constructing a theory which explained our ethical intuitions?

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Philo. 297. Honors Introduction to Philosophy.

Section 004.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students or permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 181, 182, 202, 231, 232, or 234. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A thorough examination of selected philosophical problems.

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Philo. 303. Introduction to Symbolic Logic.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 203, 296 or 414. (3). (MSA). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Historically, at least two concerns have driven the development of formal systems of logic to make explicit principles of good reasoning and to systematize inquiry in mathematics and the physical sciences. Central to these concerns is the idea that good reasoning is "truth-preserving" reasoning. ("Truth-preserving" reasoning cannot fail to take one from true premises to true conclusions.) One goal we have in the study of logic is to get a grasp on which forms of argument are truth-preserving and which are not. In this course we study two simple yet powerful systems of formal logic "sentential" logic, which takes sentences as the basic unit of logical analysis, and "predicate" logic, which takes predicates and terms as the basic units. In the course of learning these systems, we will have the chance to apply formal techniques in analyzing ordinary, garden-variety arguments, and in solving various practical problems. After mastering these logics, we'll raise some important questions concerning their power and dependability. In order to answer our questions we will have to develop a "meta-theory" for the systems we've studied. And along the way, we will learn to employ the extremely important tool of mathematical induction. No previous training in logic is required. Frequent homework assignments, two midterm examinations, and a final examination.

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Philo. 320. The World-View of Modern Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (BS).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Contemporary science, especially contemporary physics, presents us with a picture of the nature of the world that is, at first glance, very strange indeed. Yet this scientific world view arises continuously out of our naive everyday experience of the world and rests upon experimental evidence formed in our ordinary concepts for dealing with the world. This course will examine a number of examples of how the scientific conceptions arose, what kind of world they describe for us, and how the evidence of observation and experiment supports these world views. Some topics to be discussed will be the overall structure of the cosmos, the nature of space and time, the problem of motion, the structure of matter and light, and the issues of law and chance in the world. Throughout emphasis will be on what these historical examples tell us about the philosophical assumptions and methodological rules of science.

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Philo. 334. Post-Biblical Jewish Philosophy.

Section 001 Jewish Ethics. Meets with Religion 380.001.

Instructor(s): Daniel Statman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Religion 380.001.

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Philo. 345. Language and Mind.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles Travis

Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy course. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The two main questions to be treated in this course are as follows. First, in what way, if at all, does the nature of the mind shape the nature of (human) language? (And in what ways, if at all, is the nature of human language something specifically human?) Second, in what ways do the workings of the mind (or of some minds) depend on (a) language, or on something language-like? In the area of the first main question, the following more specific ones will arise. First, how, if at all, does the shape of human language depend on special-purpose language-acquisition capacities, or on general limitations on human cognition? Second, how does our understanding of what (our) words say relate to what they in fact say? Third, what must a theory be like which said, of each expression of a given language, what that expression meant? Theories aside, what do words do in meaning what they do? Fourth, is what words mean a matter of the intentions, beliefs, and so forth, of their users? If so, how? Discussion of the second of the two main questions will focus on the nature of thinking, and centrally on what it is to think thus and so. The following more specific questions will arise. First, in what way are the interactions and effects of our beliefs, desires, and so on, like computations? Second, how, if at all, is thinking thus and so structured? How is it like relating in a specific way to something sentence-like? Third, how, if at all, does our language for describing the states and workings of the mind shape what there is to describe? Fourth, can the languages we speak, or don't speak, constrain the thoughts it is possible for us to think? Philosophers to be discussed in this course will include Noam Chomsky, Hilary Putnam, Donald Davidson, Jerry Fodor, and H.P. Grice.

The course will depend primarily on lectures. But questions and discussion are always welcome, will be strongly encouraged. There will be two six to eight page essays, a revision of one of these, and one in-class exam.

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Philo. 355. Contemporary Moral Problems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephen Darwall (sdarwall@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 455. (4). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore competing theories of justice, the moral dimensions of the problems of racism and sexism, contrasting explanations of racial and gender inequality, the state enforcement of morality, and the moral status of animals and the environment. Rival conceptions of freedom, equality, and justice will be assessed through an examination of such issues as affirmative action, sexual harassment, sexual orientation, censorship of pornography, abortion, and animal rights. Several weeks will be devoted to a critical study of racism as a moral issue and as a social phenomenon. Emphasis will be placed on the relations between moral and political theories and social analysis. Class requirements will include participation in classroom discussion, three papers, and a final exam.

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Philo. 361. Ethics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J. David Velleman (velleman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a course in philosophical ethics. We will be concerned to see whether there is anything to be said in a principled way about what is valuable and what is right and wrong. But we shall also ask philosophical questions about ethics metaethical questions, as they are called. Here we will ask, not what is valuable, but what is value. And where do fundamental standards of right and wrong "come from"? The core of the course will be an examination of major works in the history of the subject. Lecture and discussion, with an emphasis on student participation. Several short papers, and a final exam.

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Philo. 371. Existentialism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on a number of major themes in the nineteenth and twentieth century existentialist movement, e.g., self-deception; dread; anxiety, and despair; death; integrity, authenticity, and individuality; freedom and responsibility; the absurd and the tragic. We will pay special attention to Dostoevsky (The Notes from Underground and The Brothers Karamazov), Nietzsche (Thus Spake Zarathustra, On the Genealogy of Morals, and Beyond Good and Evil), Sartre (Nausea and Being and Nothingness) and Camus (The Stranger and The Plague). Representative works are listed in parentheses; readings will be drawn from a selection of these writings, and possibly works by other figures.

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Philo. 388/Class. Civil. 388. History of Philosophy: Ancient.

Section 001 Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Sections 003-004 meet the ECB Jr/Sr Writing Requirement

Instructor(s): Stephen Everson (everson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. A knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required. (4). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will concentrate on the thought of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. The central texts will be the early dialogues of Plato, the Republic, and Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, but we shall look at other works to cast light on these. The approach will be topical rather than chronological and philosophical rather than literary. We shall be interested not just in establishing what these philosophers thought, but in revealing and criticising the arguments they present. We shall focus on their ethical and epistemological theories, but will also consider some of their views on metaphysics and the philosophy of mind.

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Philo. 397. Topics in Philosophy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and instructor. (1-4). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course number is designed to permit philosophy concentrators, upon recommendation of a concentration advisor, to elect a course a second time for credit when it has a different instructor and covers substantially different material.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Permission of instructor and Honors in Philosohy

Philo. 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for a total of eight credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent study of a topic not otherwise available through a regular departmental offering.

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Philo. 401. Undergraduate Honors Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eric Lormand (lormand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors concentrators in Philosophy and others by permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar which is conceived for the purpose of assisting students in writing an Honors thesis in Philosophy. The seminar begins with several weeks discussing fundamental methodological issues in philosophy, and then enters a sequence of stages, each lasting several weeks, in which students successively: (1) propose a general area for a thesis; (2) develop and explore a list of basic reading in that area; (3) write and present a brief prospectus of the thesis; and (4) write a term paper dealing with some central ideas for the thesis. The aim of the seminar is to provide advice, discussion, and support for thesis writers, so that they will be able (1) to identify and begin a thesis project that genuinely engages them and (2) to enter the Winter Term in an excellent position to write a successful thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 4: Honors in Philosophy

Philo. 402. Undergraduate Seminar in Philosophy.

Section 001 Moral Psychology

Instructor(s): Stephen Everson (everson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to junior and senior concentrators and to others by permission of concentration advisor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The seminar will be on moral psychology. We shall be considering topics which are on the borders of philosophy of mind and moral philosophy most centrally, how intentional actions are to be explained and, in particular, what sort of motivation is required for virtuous action. In the course of this, we shall cover such topics as pleasure, desire, perception, belief, and practical reason. We shall look at the work of both classical and contemporary authors.

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Philo. 410. Formal Semantics for Natural Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richmond Thomason

Prerequisites & Distribution: Phil. 296 or 303. Depending upon its content, Phil. 345 might also be helpful. Linguistics 315 and/or Linguistics 415 would be extremely helpful preparation for some versions of the course. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to linguistic theories of meaning, concentrating on the problem of how meanings of phrases (and especially of sentences) are composed from the meanings of words. In the first part of the course, we will cover topics from Meaning and Grammar: An Introduction to Semantics, by Gennaro Chierchia and Sally McConnell-Ginet. The second part of the course will deal with selected topics. (Class interest will be the most important factor in choosing these topics.)

Familiarity with logical theory is essential for this course; students should at least have taken Philosophy 303 (Symbolic Logic) or the equivalent. A midterm examination will be given to all students. Students can choose either to write a final paper on a preapproved topic, or to take a final examination.

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Philo. 414. Mathematical Logic.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Sklar (lsklar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the basic elements of mathematical logic. Propositional logic and first-order quantification theory are the central topics. We will discuss the concepts needed to frame these basic logics, the interpretation of formulas in the logics, the semantics of the theories, and methods of proving such things as the validity or invalidity of arguments framed in these logics. We will also looks at important meta-mathematical results such as the soundness and completeness of the proof systems developed and the undecidability of any proof system for quantification theory, and will touch on some more advanced topics such as the foundation of mathematics and its relation to logic. The text will be R. Jeffrey, Formal Logic: Its Scope and Limits.

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Philo. 428/Poli. Sci. 428/Asian Studies 428/Soc. 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 001 Politics & Development in China

Instructor(s): Joffe

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Political Science 428.001.

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Philo. 429. Ethical Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Allan Gibbard (gibbard@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Phil. 361, 363, or 366. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This will be a course in contemporary metaethics. Metaethics is concerned with what ethical claims mean, and with the kinds of reasoning or evidence that justify ethical claims. The course will take up the ethical intuitionism of Moore and Ross, the emotivism of Ayer and Stevenson, Hare's universal prescriptivism, and recent proposals such as Rawls' theory of reflective equilibrium, Brandt's linguistic reform, new versions of "moral realism," and moral "expressivism" with "quasi-realism." Students should already have some background in moral philosophy in the twentieth century "analytic" tradition, preferably Philosophy 361 or the equivalent. Three short (five page) papers will be required, and there will be a midterm and a final examination. Classes will consist both of lecture and of discussion.

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Philo. 439. Aesthetics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kendall Walton (klwalton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the arts painting, music, literature, photography, theater, film, etc. from a philosophical perspective, concentrating on problems concerning art and the emotions, and on questions about the cognitive importance of the arts.

Written work for the course will consist, probably, of a short paper, two exams, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Philo. 455. Contemporary Moral Problems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephen Darwall (sdarwall@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Not open to graduate students in philosophy. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 355. (4). (Excl). Does not meet the Philosophy Department's 400-level course requirement for Philosophy concentrators.

R&E

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended primarily for graduate students outside the Philosophy Department. Course content and requirements are the same as Philosophy 355 (see above), except that the papers of those enrolled in Philosophy 455 are expected to be more substantial.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 (est.) Waitlist Code: 4

Philo. 461. Continental Rationalism.

Section 001 Philosophical Writings of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz

Instructor(s): David Hills (dhills@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A detailed critical introduction to some main themes in the philosophical writings of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. These themes include:

To understand the context in which our thinkers worked, we will read brief passages from their intellectual allies and rivals. Since philosophy is both an effort to understand something difficult and an effort to write something compelling, we will pay explicit attention to the literary strategies they adopted. We will look briefly at how Leibniz helped inspire Kant, how Spinoza fostered attitudes toward nature and human nature now considered Romantic, and at how Descartes' methodic doubt served as a rough draft for the subtler suspensions of ordinary belief practiced by twentieth-century phenomenologists. But our main task is to understand and assess the work of these three thinkers as they stand, in hopes we can learn some philosophy from them.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Philo. 463. Topics in the History of Philosophy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Phil. 388 or 389. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Philo. 481. Metaphysics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas Hofweber

Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An advanced undergraduate/beginning graduate course in metaphysics, surveying a number of contemporary debates. The topics to be discussed will include: what kinds of things make up reality?, the problem of universals, the nature of events, necessity and possibility, causation, mathematical objects and mathematical objectivity, and more. The readings will be from contemporary authors. Evaluation will be based on papers rather than exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Philo. 486/WS 486. Topics in Feminist Philosophy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Anderson (andersn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in either Philosophy or Women's Studies. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The topics for this term are feminist epistemology and philosophy of science. Is rationality gendered? Are scientific conceptions of objectivity "masculine"? What could it mean to make such claims, and how could they be justified? What should a feminist conception of knowledge look like? In addressing these questions we'll explore the numerous ways that gender, gender roles, and gender identity influence the construction of knowledge and the representation of objectivity. We will investigate competing views about knowledge construction specifically, empiricism, standpoint theory, and postmodernism by considering, among other things, how they have informed empirical research in the social sciences, biology, and medicine. There will be a research paper, two short papers, and a final examination. Classes will be conducted as interactive lecture/discussions. Students should have a background (at least two courses) in either philosophy or women's studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Philo. 498. Senior Honors in Philosophy.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: By departmental permission only. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course number is to be used for those students who are in the process of writing a philosophy Honors thesis. Anyone wishing to write an Honors thesis in philosophy should consult the Philosophy Honors Advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

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