Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in RC Humanities (Division 865)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for RC Humanities.


Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements.

RC sections of LS&A Courses

These sections will be letter graded for all students Math 115 Section 110 Analytical Geometry & Calculus. See Math 115.


RC Hum. 220. Narration.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Suggested assignment: 1250 words of prose fiction every two weeks. Rewriting is emphasized. The class meets as a group up to two hours per week. Collections of short fiction by established writers are read. Every student meets privately with the instructor each week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 221. The Writing of Poetry.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The amount of poetry each student is required to submit is determined by the instructor. The class meets three hours per week as a group. In addition, each student receives private criticism from the instructor every week. Contemporary poetry is read and discussed in class for style. Students are organized into small groups that meet weekly.

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RC Hum. 222. Writing for Children and Young Adults.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Individualized instruction, group discussion, and readings aim at the development of original story ideas and the perfection of narrative techniques relevant to the authorship of children's books. Preliminary assignments picture book, folklore-narrative, and media prepare each student for a self-directed final project. No prerequisites; however, a thorough reading background in children's books or the willingness to compensate for its lack is presumed. Please do not take this course expecting "lectures" about children's books or child development. This is a writing course emphasizing story-writing skills and aesthetics.

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RC Hum. 230. Biblical, Greek, and Medieval Texts: Original Works and Modern Counterparts.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 Mandatory Film Viewings Wednesday evenings from 7-9:00

Instructor(s): Fred Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu) , Hugh Cohen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we shall study foundational texts from the Greek, Old Testament, New Testament, and Medieval worlds and a number of modern works books, essays, and films that employ the themes and situations originally set forth in these classical works.

First, we shall examine literature central to the world view of four cultures that have helped shape and continue to inform modern Western consciousness and art. Our focus will be on questions and perspectives concerning the individual's relationship to the divine order, to earthly society, and to the private self that are embodied in such works as: (I) Greek literature: Homer (The Iliad or The Odyssey); Sophocles (Oedipus, Antigone); Euripedes (Medea), Plato (Socratic dialogues); (II) Old Testament: (Genesis, Job); (III): The New Testament (The Gospels of St. Matthew and St. John); (IV): Medieval literature: Dante's The Inferno, Gottfried's Tristan.

In conjunction with these works, we will examine, where feasible, modern counterparts (or adaptations or recreations) of the classic stories or conflicts found in these classical texts. We will read essays and novels, and see films which deal with the same or similar-and perennial-ideas and conflicts. (We will also examine those values and experiences expressed in the original works that seem alien to modern consciousness.) Some of the modern works we will scrutinize are Roman Polanski's Chinatown, Max Frisch's Homo Faber, Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail, Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation of Christ, Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal.

The chief merit of our approach, besides giving the student the opportunity to read and see important and exciting stories, is in the juxtaposing of the old and the new so as to make the student more appreciative of the rootedness in the past of many of our current ideas, problems, and situations. There will be two papers and a midterm and final exam.

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RC Hum. 236/Film-Video 236. The Art of the Film.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Students are Required to Attend Film Viewing on Tuesday and Thursday Evenings Between 7-9 PM or 9-11 PM. Students Must also Register for Friday Afternoon Discussion Section

Instructor(s): Hugh Cohen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). Laboratory fee ($45) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($45) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 236.001.

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RC Hum. 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 001 Instrumental.

Instructor(s): Maria Barna (barkar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No audition required. All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two hours of credit. The second hour of credit is at the discretion of the instructor. Every student must elect section 001 for one hour; those students who will fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit MUST also elect Section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit.

For one hour of credit students must participate in two ensembles; for two credit hours, students must participate in the large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit hour (i.e., 6-8 hours of practice and rehearsal for 2 credits) and participation in one or more concerts per term, if appropriate. Course may be used to fulfill the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement.

Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of strings and winds; brass quintet; intermediate recorders; string quartet; woodwind quintet; and some other duos and trios, including piano and harpsichord.

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RC Hum. 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 The Blues As Music, The Blues As Life: Issues in Study of Blues in American Culture

Instructor(s): Brazel

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This discussion-based course takes the approach that in order to appreciate blues music deeply, you must understand its place in American culture and in order to appreciate American culture, you have to understand the blues. With its cultural foundations in the African American experience, the blues is more than just sounds it is also a philosophy, an aesthetic system and a potent social force. To achieve a deeper understanding of the power of blues music in America, this course offers interested students an opportunity to listen to and reflect on a wealth of great music. Listening tapes will include:

and many other great musicians and genres of blues music.

Musical analysis will give students the ability to identify and describe blues and blues-based music in terms of the way it sounds. At the same time, we will explore the larger cultural and social context of this music, through readings that address issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, morality, identity, aesthetics, and art as they relate to the blues. Weekly readings from eloquent writers will include:

and others who have weighed in their opinions about blues music. These readings (and our impassioned discussions about them) will enable us to find new and nuanced ways of understanding the blues in American culture.

Finally, while no musical experience is required, students are invited to play and discuss their own music as it relates to issues raised in class. A combination of listening, lectures, journals, discussion, and student presentations will make this course a multi-faceted learning experience that encourages respectful engagement both with other students and with the complex and compelling music called the blues.

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RC Hum. 252. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 Music of Southeast Asia. This course meets the RC's Arts Practicum requirement

Instructor(s): Susan Walton (swalton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Bali, Java, Thailand, and many other areas in Southeast Asia have for years held a fascination for Western social scientists, travelers and artists. This area of the world is especially renowned for the richness and variety of its performing arts traditions. These include social, court and ritual dances, music of bronze and bamboo ensembles, and elaborate theatrical traditions all of which arise from complex mixes of Hindu, Buddhist, Islamic, Christian, and animist traditions.

This course consists of two parts: surveying the major musical genres of SE Asia (in an RC classroom) and learning to play the music of the Javanese gamelan orchestra in my home, 12 minutes by foot from the RC. This course meets the RC's Arts Practicum requirement.

The survey part of the course will show how music, dance, and theatrical forms are linked to the cultures from which they spring and how they both express and challenge traditional values. The complex and shifting relationships between the performing arts, religion, and ritual will be a major focus of our inquiry. We will ask the following kind of questions: What impact has Westernization and industrialization had on traditional musical forms, especially in the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand? How do Indonesian youth transform American rock music into musical idioms expressive of traditional Islamic values? How are the ambiguities between spectators and performers and between the past, present, and future related to Burmese cosmological concepts? The musical cultures of Indonesia (Bali, Java, and Sumatra) will be the main focus of our inquiry, but the musics of Malaysia, Thailand, Burma, and the Philippines will also be surveyed. Video tapes, cassette recordings, and slides will complement the lectures.

In the musical practice part of the course, students will learn to play many of the instruments of the gamelan: gongs and racks of horizontally suspended gongs, metallophones and drums. Since the intervals and scales used are entirely different from western ones, learning to sing with this ensemble will be especially interesting. We will learn many of the pieces orally, as the Javanese do, but we will also learn to read the Javanese cipher notation system. Javanese music is structured in cycles. Part of the function of the course is to show how the specific musical elements are expressive of basic cultural views. Cycles are evident not only in the musical system but also in calendric and cosmological concepts. All are welcome: no prerequisites and no prior experience expected.

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RC Hum. 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 001 Mixed Choral Ensemble. This course meets the RC Arts Practicum requirement.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Four-part works from a variety of musical styles are rehearsed and prepared for performance in concert. Meets twice weekly. Vocal skills, sight singing, musicianship, and ensemble singing are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary. Meets the RC Arts Practicum requirement.

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RC Hum. 254. The Human Voice as An Acoustical Instrument.

Music

Section 001 Basic Technique for Singers and Actors, Including the Alexander Technique.

Instructor(s): Jane Heirich

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is open to students who want to develop their voices for speaking and singing, to sing more comfortably, and to maintain vocal health. The course is directed towards singers (with or without previous vocal training), speech, and acting students, and those who want to find out if they can sing. Most voices are undeveloped (or under-developed), and we can learn how to develop our vocal equipment for whatever our own purpose. Because our voices are housed within us, we must consider the whole voice-body-mind as the subject of our study.

Ms. Heirich is a STAT and NASTAT certified teacher of the Alexander Technique, and this body of work will inform all that we do in the course. The class meets together on Mondays and Fridays from 1-3 P.M. Your schedules should TEMPORARILY remain flexible between 12-5 on Wednesdays for scheduling of small group sessions. This scheduling will be completed by the end of the first class meeting Friday, September 11.

There will be one required text, some optional readings, daily preparation, and an individual or team project required. LS&A guidelines for 4-credit courses expect 3 hours of work per credit, hence, you should be prepared accordingly. With more than 4 hours in "class" (a weekly average of 6.25 hours, which includes the small group and individual lessons), there will be proportionally less expected of you outside of class. The required reading will be Miracles Usually Can't Be Learned, a basic vocal text by Jane Heirich, available as a course pack.

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RC Hum. 260/Dance 220 (Music). The Art of Dance: An Introduction to American and European Dance History, Aesthetics, and Criticism.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the study of dance history, criticism and aesthetics. What is dance? How can we analyze it in terms of form and "content"? What is the role of the dancer and choreographer? How can we distinguish different styles of dance? This introductory course is a basic survey of American and European dance concentrating on nineteenth- and twentieth-century dance forms including French and Russian classical ballet, American and European modern dance, African American jazz forms, and dance on film. Choreographers and dancers considered will include Coralli and Perrot, Marius Petipa, Mikhail Fokine, Vaslav Nijinsky, Bronislava Nijinska, George Balanchine, Frederick Ashton, Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey, Katherine Dunham, Merce Cunningham, Fred Astaire, Bill Robinson, John Bubbles, Gene Kelly, Twyla Tharp, and Mark Morris. Texts will include Selma Jeanne Cohen's Dance as a Theatre Art, Deborah Jowitt's Time and the Dancing Image and Susan Au's Dance and Ballet and we will also read some dance critics including Gautier, Levinson, Martin, and Croce.

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RC Hum. 280/English 245/Theatre 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bert Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course aims to introduce students to the power and variety of theatre, and to help them understand the processes which go toward making a production. Five to seven plays will be subjects of special study, chosen to cover a wide range of style and content, but interest will not be confined to these. Each student will attend two lectures weekly, plays a two-hour meeting in section each week; the latter will be used for questions, discussions, exploration of texts, and other exercises. Students will be required to attend two or more theatre performances, chosen from those available in Ann Arbor. Three papers are required plus a final examination.

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RC Hum. 291. The Experience of Arts and Ideas in the Nineteenth Century.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The nineteenth century was marked not only by revolutionary changes in society but by artistic revolution. By the beginning of the twentieth century the conventions of style and subject matter of virtually every major art form painting, music, dance, and literature had been radically altered and the role of the artist in society had been radically redefined. This interdisciplinary course will examine some of these changes and offer an introduction to major movements in European art and cultural history of the nineteenth century Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Symbolism by analyzing and comparing representative works of literature, dance, music, and the visual arts. Among possible works studied will be paintings by Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Monet, and Van Gogh, novels by Zola, Brontë, and Flaubert, music of Berlioz and Debussy, and ballets of Perrot and Bournonville.

We'll be asking some of the following kinds of questions: What is the revolution of style and subject matter brought about by Romantic art? How do Coralli and Perrot's ballet Giselle and the Symphonie Fantastique of Berlioz reflect these changes and the new attitude of the artist towards himself and his art? Can we find similar aims in certain realist novels of Zola and the realist painting of Courbet and Manet? Can we compare the revolution in the structure and subject matter of painting brought about by the Impressionist and Symbolist painters to the revolution in form brought to music by Debussy? What can we learn about the evolving view of women's place in society by comparing the portrayal of women in paintings by Berthe Morisot and Edouard Manet and the portrayal of women in literature by Ibsen and Edith Wharton? These and other questions will be considered by Beth Genné and class.

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RC Hum. 310. Medieval Sources of Modern Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cynthia Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

During the medieval period, a major revision of the representation of the body took place in Western art. The classical paradigm, in which the body occurs as a mathematical canon, an idea, or an illusion, is subverted, stood on its head, and sometimes repudiated altogether. Instead, the concrete physicality of the body interior space as well as surface, internal organs as well as external appearance becomes the starting point for such literary genres as confession, song, narrative, and meditation.

Very often, the body is projected into these genres as the imaginative landscape within which they unfold. Even more, the body and its organic transformations become the site of verbal and visual figuration; they generate a rhetoric. This refigured body does not always observe the syntax assigned to it by classical convention. Instead, it begins to speak an extravagant language: the skin is a book, tongues of fire burst from every side, hearts have ears, bellies have mouths, and genitals flourish an array of musical instruments. Nor are the well-bred hierarchies of classical decorum preserved; humiliation, decay, and the collapse of the body under the blows of violence, disease, and time, are all rhetoricalized with the intensity usually reserved for displays of power and invulnerability.

In Medieval Sources, we will explore this new representation of the body in both literature and the visual arts. This interdisciplinary approach will involve the close reading of texts and the careful analysis of images. Our goal will be to improve these skills, reading and looking, and to become both more sophisticated and more confident in the way in which we generate our own interpretations from the material.

Plato; Phaedo
Classical sources of early Christian art

Lives and Sayings of the Desert Fathers
The Life of St. Mary the Egyptian
Early Christian art of the Eastern Empire: Egypt, Syria, Constantinople

St. Augustine; Confessions
Byzantine art: Ravenna

Anglo-Saxon poetry
Iro-Celtic book illumination

Hildegard von Bingen: Songs and Sequences
Romanesque portals: Moissac
Romanesque sculpture: Reliquaries; The Throne of Wisdom

Marie de France; Lais
Gothic sculpture: the portal program of Chartres

Julian of Norwich; Revelations of Divine Love
Matthias Grunewald; The Isenheim Altarpiece

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 313/Slavic Film 313. Russian Cinema.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Herbert Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Slavic Linguistics, Literary Theory, Film, and Surveys 313.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

RC Hum. 317. The Writings of Latinas.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Texts of the Borderlands

Instructor(s): Eliana Moya-Raggio (elmoras@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in women's studies or Latina/o studies. (4). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course brings to the forefront the abundant literary production of Latinas in the United States. The core of the work will comprise reading and discussion of works (essays, poems, narrative fiction) of Chicana writers, as well as women writers from Puerto Rico, Cuba, Central America, the Caribbean, and South America. Among the authors to be studied are Julia Alvarez, Sandra Cisneros, Cristina Garcia, Judith Ortiz Coffer, Gloria Anzaldua, Helena Maria Viramontes, Elena Castedo, and Alicia Partnoy. Films and visual art by Latinas will supplement the literature in the course.

The works selected are richly textured, filled with cultural content, and embued with nostalgic evocation of what has been lost. Representing a broad range of Latina experience, they confront such issues as colonial domination and political and/or economic exile. All of the texts relate to the history of the Americas, and address the position of women within their own cultural/ethnic/racial group as well as within a dominant culture.

Students will be expected to keep a journal of their reactions to the works read or viewed and to write three substantial papers which reflect their ability in critical reading of the texts. They will also prepare and deliver seminar presentations on selected poetry in the course.

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RC Hum. 321. Advanced Poetry Writing.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 221 and permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an advanced poetry writing workshop. Students must be willing to read their poems in class and actively participate in the critical evaluation of other students' work. A finished manuscript of 25-30 poems is a course requirement. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

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RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Keith Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): L. Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

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RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

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RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

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RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Keith Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

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RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): L Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.005.

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RC Hum. 340. Four Interdisciplinary Studies in 19th and 20th Century Intellectual History: Psychoanalysis, Mysticism, Nihilism and Marxism.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Fred Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior/senior standing. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will compare and contrast the presentation of several ideas that have fundamentally redefined Western man's concept of himself in the last 100 years as reflected in four different disciplines (political science, philosophy, theology, and psychology) and three literary genres (drama, novel, and short story). These ideas center upon the rise of the totalitarian state, the emergence of "psychological man," and the destruction of the concept of God as well as of all absolute value systems. How do the styles of each discipline and genre differ according to the writer's aim and intended effect upon the reader? Can we isolate and describe the particular techniques (discursive and metaphoric) used, respectively, by the political scientist, philosopher, theologian, and psychologist to explain and convince? In particular, how does literature as a genre differ from the four other disciplines in its function as a "living laboratory" for the exploration of and experimentation with new visions of the self and society?

  1. Literature and Psychology: Psychoanalysis in the Short Story. Theories of psychosexual development and the father-son conflict. Texts by Freud, Kafka.
  2. Literature and Theology: The Irrational in the Novel. Man's religious, mystical impulse in conflict with the logic of science and the demands of rational self-interest. Texts by Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky.
  3. Literature and Philosophy: Existentialism in the Novel. Nihilism and the concomitant destruction of Christian morality and the Western concept of self. Texts by Nietzsche, Sartre.
  4. Literature and Political Science: Communism and the Drama. The ethics and psychology of communist revolution and terrorism. Texts by Marx, Lenin, Brecht, Sartre. Two examinations and one term paper required.
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RC Hum. 344. Tradition and Invention: Aspects of the Arts in 18th Century Europe.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Willette

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The premise of this course is that the visual arts, literature and musical drama of the 18th century were, to an unprecedented degree, agents in the propagation of "useful knowledge" and new thinking about the human and natural orders. The course will introduce major genres and discourses of the Enlightenment with a view to appreciating the way political, social, economic, and religious views were articulated in the "polite" forms of letters and arts, as well as in poetry set to music. Major debates in political philosophy concerning the nature of human civilization, for example, may be tracked through literary works of Defoe, Pope, Rousseau, and Voltaire, and through paintings by David, Greuze, Reynolds, Elizabeth Vigee-Lebrun, Wright of Derby, and Benjamin West, as well as in the opera libretti of Metastasio. Rationalism, primitivism, republicanism, the emergent civic roles of women and new theories of child-rearing all find expression in the arts, due in large part to new patterns of patronage and the development of consumer culture in cities. An important case study will be the ceramics factory of Josiah Wedgewood and the commodification of elite classical culture in the form of well-crafted replicas, a phenomenon that may also be traced in the marketing of engravings after antiquities made famous by the Grand Tour.
Readings to include:
Locke, Essay Concerning Human Understanding
Defoe, Robinson Crusoe
Pope, Essay on Man
Voltaire, Candide
Shaftesbury, Characteristics
Diderot, Salons
Vico, Autobiography
Rousseau, Emile
Burney, Evelina
Vigee-Lebrun, Letters
Films include:
Dangerous Liaisons
La nuit de Varennes
Valmont

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 385. The Theatre of Bertolt Brecht.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to arrive at an informed understanding of the generally used term "Brechtian." The course will feature an in-depth study of significant works from every phase of Brecht's long career as playwright: (a) Early Baal and Threepenny Opera; (b) Marxist the Lehrstücke (Teaching Pieces), Exception and the Rule and The Measures Taken; (c) Anti-Fascist Arturo Ui; (d) Mature, Post-war Mother Courage and Galileo. These plays will be examined through lecture/discussion and in-class scene work in more or less equal proportions. Substantial portions of Brecht's dramatic theory (from Brecht on Theatre) will also be included. Individual research leading to a class presentation on another work from the Brecht canon and focussing on a particular aspect of production (music, set and costume design, adaptations of classic works, the film and radio media, etc.) will be required together with participation in two staged-readings Brecht's version of Goethe's Urfaust (midterm) and the radio play The Trial of Lucullus (end-of-term).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Keith Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): L Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Keith Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): L Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.005.

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RC Hum. 427. Furlough Term in Creative Writing.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 or 326; and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Hum. 451/Russian 451. Survey of Russian Literature.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian 451.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 476/Chinese 476/Asian Studies 476. Writer and Society in Modern China.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Rolston (drolston@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese is required. (4). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Chinese 476.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

RC Hum. 482. Drama Interpretation II: Performance Workshop.

Drama

Section 001 (4 credits)

Instructor(s): Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 280 and either Hums. 282 or playwriting. (4-6). (CE).

Credits: (4-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this hands on workshop, students will learn the essential elements involved in directing a theatre production. They will be assigned a series of exercises on choreography and staging, and will learn techniques for creative collaborative work with actors and designers. Classwork will challenge them to explore a range of dramatic material and will give them numerous opportunities to direct, from improvisations, to scenes, to the final presentation of a one-act play. Directors will have the chance to work regularly with acting students from Humanities 485 as "in-house" acting company.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 484. Seminar in Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 Modernist Masters

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, Hums. 280, and three 300- or 400-level drama courses. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an evening workshop in verse-speaking for writers, actors, and students of literature generally, based on the works of the Modernist masters: Walt Whitman, William Butler Yeats, Ezra Pound, and T.S. Eliot. (Excursions might also be made to W.H. Auden or Derek Walcott's Omeros.) Students will be turned loose on these major modern poets. Passages will be selected weekly, "rehearsed," and brought into class for presentation, critique, and coaching, whereupon pieces will be selected for further development (including dips into the critical literature) and repeat presentation. Stage-oriented vocal exercises based on Cicely Berry's work with the Royal Shakespeare Company will be a regular feature of the course as students learn how to increase their vocal range and interest, how to "score" a text, and how to "deliver" a live performance. A repertory of verse performance-pieces will thus be evolved in the course of the term leading to an end-of-term, public "recital," or perhaps a group performance of a longer work such as Eliot's The Wasteland.

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RC Hum. 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 Acting Workshop. (2 credits)

Instructor(s): Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Foriegn Lit Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this two credit course students will have a chance to work on a number of creative exercises and challenging scene assignments as an "in-house" acting company for directing students from Hums 482, "Director and Text". Actors will have the opportunity to learn about the audition process from the director's perspective and to explore a wide range of dramatic material. All acting students will participate in a range of improvisations and staging exercises as well as experience intensive scene study and a sustained rehearsal process for a one-act play at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

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