Fall '99 Course Guide

Minicourses for Fall Term 1999

A mini-course is a one-credit course not associated with any other course (i.e., a one-credit lab is not a minicourse) that either meets for part of the term, or one hour a week for the entire term.

Two-credit short courses occasionally are offered, meeting for only part of the term.

If the course meets for only part of the term, the meeting dates are indicated in the Section Title of the course.

Fall Term 1999 Course Guide homepage

Minicourses for Fall Term 1999 WITHOUT Descriptions


CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 001 France, Africa, and Genocide: A Focus on Rwanda. (2 credits). Meets with History 590.001 and French 636.001

Instructor(s): Jose Kagabo

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 590.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Asian St. 491. Topics in Japanese Studies.

Section 001 Agriculture and Japanese Society and Political Economy, 1700 to 1930. Course meets 10/15-12/15/99

Instructor(s): Stephen Vlastos

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The focus of this course will be agriculture, economic developments, and social change in rural Japan from the mid-Tokugawa period to the interwar period, and the implications of these processes for the larger polity and economy. The course is a seminar, no prerequisites, grading based on papers and participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Astro. 127. Naked Eye Astronomy.

Section 001, 002 Meets September 8 to October 20

Instructor(s): Julia Plummer (plummerj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.astro.lsa.umich.edu/Course/material.html

The purpose of this course is to examine and understand the observational phenomena that everyone has observed and become familiar with. Students will learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, and the stars. Students will come to understand astronomical phenomena such as the motion of these objects on the sky and their implications: seasons; phases of the moon; solar and lunar eclipses; and the perplexing motions of the planets. Another important topic is the changing stellar sky, including the identification of the brighter stars and constellations during the different seasons. Transient objects such as comets and meteors will be discussed, and a meteorite shower will be observed. The course will conclude with a discussion of ancient observatories and the historical efforts by humanity to measure important astronomical phenomena. A planetarium will be one of the primary teaching facilities, but students will make their own observations and also work with computer programs, such as "The Sky." There will be homework assignments and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Astro. 127. Naked Eye Astronomy.

Section 003, 004 Meets October 25 to December 8

Instructor(s): Julia Plummer (plummerj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.astro.lsa.umich.edu/Course/material.html

The purpose of this course is to examine and understand the observational phenomena that everyone has observed and become familiar with. Students will learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, and the stars. Students will come to understand astronomical phenomena such as the motion of these objects on the sky and their implications: seasons; phases of the moon; solar and lunar eclipses; and the perplexing motions of the planets. Another important topic is the changing stellar sky, including the identification of the brighter stars and constellations during the different seasons. Transient objects such as comets and meteors will be discussed, and a meteorite shower will be observed. The course will conclude with a discussion of ancient observatories and the historical efforts by humanity to measure important astronomical phenomena. A planetarium will be one of the primary teaching facilities, but students will make their own observations and also work with computer programs, such as "The Sky." There will be homework assignments and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Biol. Chem. 578. Biochemical Techniques.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Tom Kerppola

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two terms of organic chemistry; Biol. Chem. 415 or Chem. 451/452. Physical chemistry is strongly recommended. (1). (Excl). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In-depth discussions of important techniques in biochemistry research, including primary sequence determination of proteins; protein purification; spectroscopy; computer assisted analysis of structure; computer analysis of DNA and protein sequences; protein chemistry; immunological techniques; identifying a gene in a library; electrophoresis; and directed mutagenesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Biol. 521. Bacterial Physiology II: Carbon Metabolism.

Section 001 Meets Oct. 12 Nov. 4

Instructor(s): Robert Bender (rbender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 305, and Biol. 310 or 311 or Biol. Chem. 415. (1). (Excl). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on central metabolism especially the catabolism of glucose, lactose, and amino acids. Among the topics considered will be: (1) "The memory paradox" where bacterial cells remember how they were grown 40 generations ago in the absence of external reminder; (2) the integration of pathways and how changes in one effect the flow of another; and (3) global regulators (known and unknown) that integrate complex signals and transmit them into gene expression responses. Biochemistry shows that pathways exist, physiology asks the questions of how they function and why they are important. The key theme of the course will be regulation rather than memorizing pathways. Bacterial Physiology II is entirely independent of the related Bacterial Physiology I and III courses and can be taken without either of the others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 522. Bacterial Physiology III: Nitrogen Metabolism.

Section 001 Meets Nov. 9 Dec. 9

Instructor(s): Robert Bender (rbender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 305, and Biol 310, 311, or Biol. Chem 415. (1). (Excl). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on the interconversion of various kinds of nitrogen sources. Topics will include the reduction of nitrate and atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia and the catabolism of urea and amino acids. Emphasis will be on the regulation of these pathways and the regulatory features that allow cells to use only the "appropriate" nitrogen sources to supply their needs. For example, how does a cell know to use the urea before porline as a nitrogen source (and ammonia before urea)? The key theme of the course will be regulation and the logical methods used to figure out how regulation functions. Bacterial Physiology III is entirely independent of the related Bacterial Physiology I and II courses and can be taken without either of the others. The course is intended for graduate students and upper class undergraduates with an interest in microbiology or biochemical regulation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Class. Civ. 215. Ovid.

Section 001 Minicourse Begins Oct. 26

Instructor(s): Ruth Scodel (rscodel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (HU).

Foriegn Lit Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.-personal.umich.edu/~rscodel/ovid.html

Ovid has been among the most influential writers in the European literary tradition, and he is one of the most enjoyable authors in the canon. This mini-seminar will examine both the original contexts of his works and what he has meant for later readers, with emphasis on the love poetry and the "Metamorphoses." Themes will include his treatment of women and sexuality, his narrative technique and wit, his relationships with Augustus and with Roman power, his presentation of self, and whatever aspects the group finds most interesting. We will look at both recent adaptations, including Ted Hughes' "Tales from Ovid" and the collection "After Ovid," and Elizabethan translations, including Golding's "Metamorphoses" (which Shakespeare used) and Christopher Marlowe's "Amores." We will also look (briefly) at paintings based on Ovidian themes from the Renaissance to the present. There will be two short papers and oral reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Comp. Sci. 284/EECS 284. Introduction to a Programming Language or System.

Section 001 Hardware Bridge Course

Prerequisites & Distribution: Some programming knowledge is required. No credit granted for the C minicourse to those students who have completed CS 280. (1). (Excl). (BS).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Comp. Sci. 285/EECS 285. A Programming Language or Computer System.

Section 001 Java

Instructor(s): Sandra Bartlett (bartlett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.eecs.umich.edu/~bartlett/f99java.html

Programming problems will be assigned.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Geol. Sci. 100. Coral Reefs.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 Offered Oct. 26 to Dec. 9 with Final Exam on Dec. 9 Or Arranged

Instructor(s): Philip Meyers (pameyers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 156 (or 260). (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Coral Reefs will be an in-depth tour of the biological and physical processes active in modern reef systems to provide a detailed understanding of the ecology of the individual organisms and the complex nature of their interactions within the reef community. Evolution of the reef community will be examined, ranging from the crude framework structures formed over one billion years ago by primitive algae to the luxuriant and diversified reefs of the modern-day oceans, to define the evolutionary strategies of reef building organisms. By tracking these evolutionary strategies through geologic time, the implications of man's intervention with the Earth's hydrosphere and atmosphere on the character of future reef communities will be considered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Geol. Sci. 104. Ice Ages, Past and Future.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 Offered Sept. 9 to Oct. 21 with Final Exam on Oct. 21 Or Arranged

Instructor(s): John Hoaglund (hoaglund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 151 (or 275). (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course looks at the effects of present and past glaciations on the landscape and on life, humans in particular. Glaciers are examined as dynamic, climatically controlled systems of moving ice. Climatic and environmental changes concurrent with glaciation, in both continental and oceanic realms, are reviewed. The causes of the ice ages that have dominated the Earth for the past two million years and predictions of future ice ages are examined in the light of current geological and climatic research. The course consists of lectures, one hour exam, and one final exam. Required Course Materials: Course Pack. Recommended Textbook: Ice Age Earth, Late Quaternary Geology and Climate, Dawson, A.G., 1992, Routledge, New York, NY ISBN 0-415-01567-7

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Geol. Sci. 107. Volcanoes and Earthquakes.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 Offered Sept. 9 to Oct. 21. Final Exam on Oct. 21 Or Arranged

Instructor(s): Carolina Lithgow-Bertelloni (crlb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 205, 146, or 147 (or 270 or 271). (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is a study of the earth in action and includes the following topics: geography of earthquakes and volcanoes; catastrophic events in historic times; size and frequency of occurrence of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; the products of volcanism; volcanic rocks; volcanic activity through geologic time; volcanic exhalations and the evolution of the Earth's atmosphere and oceans; relationship of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate tectonics and the internal dynamics of the Earth; volcanism and geothermal energy; manmade earthquakes; and earthquake prediction and control. Instruction by lecture, evaluation on basis of quizzes and final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Geol. Sci. 107. Volcanoes and Earthquakes.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 002 Offered Oct. 26 to Dec. 9 with Final Exam on Dec. 9 Or Arranged

Instructor(s): Rebecca Lange (becky@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 205, 146, or 147 (or 270 or 271). (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is a study of the earth in action and includes the following topics: geography of earthquakes and volcanoes; catastrophic events in historic times; size and frequency of occurrence of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions; the products of volcanism; volcanic rocks; volcanic activity through geologic time; volcanic exhalations and the evolution of the earth's atmosphere and oceans; relationship of earthquakes and volcanoes to plate tectonics and the internal dynamics of the earth; volcanism and geothermal energy; manmade earthquakes; and earthquake prediction and control. Instruction by lecture, evaluation on basis of quizzes and final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Geol. Sci. 110. The History of the Oceans.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 Offered Sept. 9 to Oct 21. Final Exam on Oct. 21 Or Arranged

Instructor(s): Philip Meyers (pameyers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 222. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The history of past oceanic inhabitants, events, and environments is recorded in the sediments which have accumulated on the ocean bottom throughout geological time. Fossils of marine plants and animals are a major part of the historical record; they give evidence of past oceanic living conditions and the evolution of life forms in the sea. Sediment particles eroded from land and carried to the oceans by rivers and winds provide insights into past climates on continents. Changes in ocean currents and in seawater chemistry have left their mark on the sediment record; the possible causes of these changes are explored. Plate tectonics and seafloor spreading have rearranged the shapes of ocean basins and repositioned continents over time. These processes are reflected in the record in marine sediments still present on the ocean floor and also in those now uplifted to form part of the continents. These topics are presented in lectures held twice weekly for a half term. A single exam at the end of the course will determine the course grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Geol. Sci. 111. Climate and Mankind.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 001 Offered Sept. 9 to Oct. 21 with Final Exam on Oct. 21 Or Arranged

Instructor(s): Theodore Moore (tedmoore@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 201 or 151 (or 275). (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The intent of GS 111 is to give a heightened awareness to students of the nature and fragility of the Earth's climate, and how changes in climate have affected past civilizations and may affect our future. Course topics will include: a description of the climate systems of the Earth: the atmosphere, oceans, and polar ice caps; the information we gather to understand the history of those systems; how changes in climate have affected past civilizations, and what we think will happen to the planet when the long expected "Greenhouse Effect Global Warming" finally arrives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Geol. Sci. 111. Climate and Mankind.

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-concentrators

Section 002 Offered Oct. 26 to Dec. 9 with Final Exam on Dec. 9 Or Arranged

Instructor(s): Carola Stearns (cstearns@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GS 201 or 151 (or 275). (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The intent of GS 111 is to give a heightened awareness to students of the nature and fragility of the Earth's climate, and how changes in climate have affected past civilizations and may affect our future. Course topics will include: a description of the climate systems of the Earth: the atmosphere, oceans, and polar ice caps; the information we gather to understand the history of those systems; how changes in climate have affected past civilizations, and what we think will happen to the planet when the long expected "Greenhouse Effect Global Warming" finally arrives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

History 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 001 France, Africa, and Genocide: A Focus on Rwanda. (2 credits). Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 490.001 and French 636.001. Undergraduates with Permission of Instructor Only

Instructor(s): Jose Kagabo

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Seminar-style mini-course devoted to considering the history and politics of France's relations with Africa, with a particular focus on genocide and human rights in Rwanda, including France's involvement therein. Course will be taught by the Rwandan historian, Dr. Jose Kagabo, visiting UM from the Ecole des Hautes Etudes in Paris. Several other faculty with relevant expertise, including Frieda Ekotto of the French Department, Fred Cooper and Nancy Hunt from History, and Mamadou Diouf, Visiting Professor in History and CAAS (from CODESRIA in Dakar, Senegal), will be seminar participants. Discussion will be in English. About one third of the readings and films will be in French. A knowledge of French is not necessary, though French speakers and readers are encouraged to take this course. Course readings will include historical, contemporary political, and literary texts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 002 Narrative, Case Files, and Women's Health. (1 credit). September 30-October 21. Meets with Women's Studies 698.002

Instructor(s): Nancy Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu), Timothy Johnson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 003.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Physics 103. The Physical Universe: Relativity and Quanta.

Section 001 Meets from Sept. 8 to Oct. 22

Prerequisites & Distribution: High School geometry, trigonometry, and algebra. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of physicists is to understand everything that goes on in the universe in terms of a small number of fundamental laws of nature. The various laws we presently know may even derive from some single unifying principle. The laws of gravity, relativity, electromagnetism, and quantum mechanics will be discussed and applied to simple problems. Grades will be based on homework and a research paper of approximately 3000 words.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Physics 104. The Physical Universe: What Einstein Never Knew.

Section 001 Meets from Oct. 27 to Dec. 10

Prerequisites & Distribution: High School geometry, trigonometry, and algebra. (1). (NS). (BS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goals of physicists are to understand everything that goes on in the universe in terms of a small number of fundamental laws of nature. Recent developments involving quarks, leptons, black holes, big-bang cosmology, dark matter, etc., will be described on an elementary level. In the end, all questions of "how" and "why" must be answered or else pushed to the limit of present knowledge. Grades will be based on homework and a research paper of approximately 3000 words. The are no college physics or advanced mathematics prerequisites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

RC Hum. 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 001 Instrumental.

Instructor(s): Maria Barna (barkar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No audition required. All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two hours of credit. The second hour of credit is at the discretion of the instructor. Every student must elect section 001 for one hour; those students who will fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit MUST also elect Section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit.

For one hour of credit students must participate in two ensembles; for two credit hours, students must participate in the large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit hour (i.e., 6-8 hours of practice and rehearsal for 2 credits) and participation in one or more concerts per term, if appropriate. Course may be used to fulfill the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement.

Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of strings and winds; brass quintet; intermediate recorders; string quartet; woodwind quintet; and some other duos and trios, including piano and harpsichord.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 001 Mixed Choral Ensemble. This course meets the RC Arts Practicum requirement.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Four-part works from a variety of musical styles are rehearsed and prepared for performance in concert. Meets twice weekly. Vocal skills, sight singing, musicianship, and ensemble singing are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary. Meets the RC Arts Practicum requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 Acting Workshop. (2 credits)

Instructor(s): Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Foriegn Lit Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this two credit course students will have a chance to work on a number of creative exercises and challenging scene assignments as an "in-house" acting company for directing students from Hums 482, "Director and Text". Actors will have the opportunity to learn about the audition process from the director's perspective and to explore a wide range of dramatic material. All acting students will participate in a range of improvisations and staging exercises as well as experience intensive scene study and a sustained rehearsal process for a one-act play at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Interdiv. 350. Special Topics.

Section 001 Marxism. (1 credit). Meets September 13 October 13

Instructor(s): Carl Cohen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in an associated course. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The objectives of this course are to help students achieve a full understanding of the philosophy of Marxism its roots, its theoretical integrity, and its applications, both in the 19th century and today.

We will read and study some classic texts, by Marx and others. Both defenses and attacks on these views will be discussed; our object throughout will not be advocacy but the comprehension of the work of one of the greatest philosophers of the modern world, and of the great movement of which Karl Marx is the central philosophical force.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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