Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in Classical Archaeology (Division 342)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for Classical Archaeology.


The Department of Classical Studies believes that the literature, monuments, and social institutions of the ancient world, together with the reflections of the Greek and Roman thinkers about their own cultures, are of unique value in themselves, well worth our contemplation and understanding; and that as we attempt to learn about and appreciate classical civilization, we necessarily learn as well a variety of contemporary methodologies and disciplines.

The department offers three groups of courses for distribution, those in Classical Civilization (introductory courses that require no knowledge of Greek or Latin), courses in Classical Archaeology, and upper-level language courses in Greek and Latin authors or genres. While only a few courses are repeated in yearly or biennial rotation, most courses are offered less regularly. This system guarantees that the instructor approaches the subject each time with fresh impetus. We believe in a healthy change and variation in our course offerings.

Classical Civilization offerings include the general surveys of Greek and Roman civilizations (CC 101 and 102), which provide (through readings, lectures, and discussions) a broad understanding of the literatures, thought, and social development of ancient Greece and Rome, and thus provide the student with knowledge of and appreciation for our cultural origins, as well as an acquaintance with modern methods for understanding an ancient culture. These courses are taught each year. CC 101 is offered in the Fall and CC 102 is offered in the Winter. Other courses provide understanding of particular aspects of the ancient world, approached from a variety of disciplines and studies literary, philosophical, historical, sociological, and so on. Some students (particularly those who have already developed special interests in such disciplines) may wish to explore one of these topics without having had a broader introduction.

Classical Archaeology offerings include the broad surveys of the archaeology and monuments of Greece (Cl.Arch 221 offered in the Fall) and Rome (Cl.Arch 222 offered in the Winter) and a general introduction to archaeological field methods (Cl.Arch 323). Other courses use the material remains of specific cultures both to introduce students to the diversity of the ancient world and to demonstrate how, through a variety of multi-disciplinary approaches, the archaeological record can be used to reconstruct the life-ways of past societies.


Class. Arch. 221/Hist. of Art 221. Introduction to Greek Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lauren Talalay (talalay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~classics/ca/221/

This course surveys the history, culture, and art of Crete and Greece as revealed by archaeology from the third millennium through the 4th century B.C. In the prehistoric period, particular attention is given to architectural and ceramic developments as well as to the crosscurrent of trade and economic contacts among Asia Minor, Crete, and mainland Greece. Emphasis is also given to the impact archaeology has had on views and theories of history: the destructions of the civilizations of Crete and Troy, the end of the Bronze Age, the volcanic eruption of Thera. In the historic period, major artistic developments in architecture, sculpture, and painting are considered and special attention is given to social interpretations: temples as banks and monasteries; sculpture as dedication, decoration, and commemorative propaganda; architectural sculpture as realized myth. Discussions in the sections will be interactive, concentrating on archaeological field techniques, analysis, and ancient society. The sections will meet in the Kelsey Museum where it will be possible to work with the actual ancient artifacts recovered in University of Michigan excavations. There are three one-hour examinations, as well as illustrated lectures and assigned readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Arch. 323. Introduction to Field Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Alcock (salcock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~classics/ca/323/

Admit it you wanted to be an archaeologist when you grew up, and you enjoy Indiana Jones movies. This course is designed to build on these enthusiasms while also expanding your notions about just what archaeology is and just what archaeologists do. If archaeologists, to put it most simply, "study the past", what is left for them to study? Is digging the only way to find things? Who pays for archaeological work, and who owns the objects discovered? What can we learn about people in the past? What did they eat? What killed them off? Are only "real men" capable of discovering the truth about all this? Who owns the right to talk about the past? To examine these and other questions, archaeological case studies will be drawn from all over the world, with an emphasis on the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean. The course is lecture-based, with sections designed to explore particular topics in detail; fieldtrips, for example to various university museums, are also planned. The text book is C. Renfrew and P. Bahn, Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Practice, together with a supplemental course pack. Requirements include a midterm, final, and one project, which offers the chance to experiment with some "real" (and responsible) archaeology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Arch. 435/Hist. of Art 435. The Art and Archaeology of Asia Minor.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Pedley (jpedley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/435-001.html

The course will examine the art and archaeology of the Lydians, Greeks, and Romans (and, to some degree, that of their predecessors) in Asia Minor. Town planning, urbanization, architecture, sculpture, and vase painting will be followed, with attention to origin, distribution, and social and political use of types and styles. The process of Hellenization will be one focus of attention, and Romanization will be another. An hour exam at midterm, and a 10-20 page paper will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Arch. 439/Hist. of Art 439. Greek Vase Painting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/439-001.html

An introductory survey of the painted pottery produced on the Greek mainland from Mycenaean times through the early Hellenistic period. Pottery will be examined for art-historical, cultural, and archaeological information. The artist's progress in realistic representation of the human figure as revealed on Greek vases will be studied. Emphasis will be placed on the domination of the pottery market by different cities at different times. The use of pottery as an archaeological tool in dating and evaluating an excavation will be discussed. There are illustrated lectures and extensive reserve reading. A midterm, final, and a paper are expected.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Arch. 499. Supervised Reading.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Regular reports and conferences required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Class. Arch. 536/Hist. of Art 536. Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elaine Gazda (gazda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 101 or Class. Arch. 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/536-001.html

See History of Art 536.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Arch. 599. Supervised Study in Classical Archaeology.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Regular reports and conferences required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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