Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in Classical Civilization (Division 344)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for Classical Civilization.


The Department of Classical Studies believes that the literature, monuments, and social institutions of the ancient world, together with the reflections of the Greek and Roman thinkers about their own cultures, are of unique value in themselves, well worth our contemplation and understanding; and that as we attempt to learn about and appreciate classical civilization, we necessarily learn as well a variety of contemporary methodologies and disciplines.

The department offers three groups of courses for distribution, those in Classical Civilization (introductory courses that require no knowledge of Greek or Latin), courses in Classical Archaeology, and upper-level language courses in Greek and Latin authors or genres. While only a few courses are repeated in yearly or biennial rotation, most courses are offered less regularly. This system guarantees that the instructor approaches the subject each time with fresh impetus. We believe in a healthy change and variation in our course offerings.

Classical Civilization offerings include the general surveys of Greek and Roman civilizations (CC 101 and 102), which provide (through readings, lectures, and discussions) a broad understanding of the literatures, thought, and social development of ancient Greece and Rome, and thus provide the student with knowledge of and appreciation for our cultural origins, as well as an acquaintance with modern methods for understanding an ancient culture. These courses are taught each year. CC 101 is offered in the Fall and CC 102 is offered in the Winter. Other courses provide understanding of particular aspects of the ancient world, approached from a variety of disciplines and studies literary, philosophical, historical, sociological, and so on. Some students (particularly those who have already developed special interests in such disciplines) may wish to explore one of these topics without having had a broader introduction.

Classical Archaeology offerings include the broad surveys of the archaeology and monuments of Greece (Cl.Arch 221 offered in the Fall) and Rome (Cl.Arch 222 offered in the Winter) and a general introduction to archaeological field methods (Cl.Arch 323). Other courses use the material remains of specific cultures both to introduce students to the diversity of the ancient world and to demonstrate how, through a variety of multi-disciplinary approaches, the archaeological record can be used to reconstruct the life-ways of past societies.

Courses in this division do not require a knowledge of Greek or Latin. They are intended for students who wish to acquire knowledge of ancient literature, life, and thought, and of the debt modern civilization owes the Greeks and Romans.


Class. Civ. 101. Classical Civilization I: The Ancient Greek World (in English).

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara Forsdyke (forsdyke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Great Books 191 or 201. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~classics/cc/101/

Greek literature presents us with fascinating stories and memorable characters, from Homer's Achilles to Sophocles' Oedipus, from the women of Aristophanes' comedy Lysistrata to Plato's Socrates. In this course, we will read many of these great works and learn about the social, political and cultural context in which they were produced. Major themes include the concept of heroism and relations between individual and community, divine and mortal, man and woman. These themes will be discussed as they relate to the literature and society of Ancient Greece, but also as they relate to our lives today. Although we will focus on literature, we will also pay some attention to material culture (cities, temples, statues, vases).

There will be approximately 90 pages of reading per week, two short papers, a midterm and a final examination. All reading is in English. Students who enroll in this course may choose to take the companion course, Classical Civilization 102 (offered in the Winter Term), which traces the literary and cultural development of Roman civilization. Students who complete this sequence are encouraged to consider a concentration in Classical Studies (go to http://www.umich.edu/~classics/classicshome/UG_info.html).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 001 Theaters of Identity: Ancient Greece.

Instructor(s): James Porter (jport@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/1999/fall/lsa/classciv/120/001.nsf

We are indebted to the ancient Greeks not only for so many aspects of our culture but for the way we tend to see ourselves as identifiable "selves." This course will explore some of the manifold arts of identity in antiquity and their relevance to us today through a variety of ancient and contemporary sources. The course will be interdisciplinary in nature, and will provide an introduction, from an ancient perspective, to the way we look at the work (literature, sculpture, architectural forms, political and moral values) and at ourselves. And it will explore some of the ways in which these two ways of looking are often invisibly connected. The format of the course will be that of a seminar, with discussion centering on set texts, objects, and problems and further focussed by short (4 pp.) biweekly position papers by participants and pre-circulated (possibly by being posted on an interactive website). A final paper of about 10 pp. or a joint in-class presentation will allow students to synthesize their findings from over the course of the term. Materials and readings will include John Berger, Ways of Seeing; M. Beard and J. Henderson, Classics: A Very Short Introduction; A.F. Stewart, Art, Desire and the Body in Ancient Greece; as well as a hymns to table-talk, from sculpted bodies to discussions of bodies and souls in philosophy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 002 Myths in Images: Expression and Communication in the Visual Cultures of Graeco-Roman Antiquity.

Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Myths in ancient Greece and Rome formed the principle means for articulating the fundamental concepts of the physical and moral universe of the cultures that sought expression in them. Greeks and Romans loved to "think" of their myths in images covering a wide variety of media, ranging from unassuming drinking vessels to grandiose religious buildings; from personal ornaments to funeral caskets. Despite the fact that we live in an increasingly visual culture, the usages of this imagery may often seem puzzling or even paradoxical to us today. Why did the Greeks and Romans need images? What is the function of images in pre-literate cultures? How were myths in images supposed to be read? This seminar will explore these issues and, in order to do so, we will confront ourselves with a multiplicity of visual media and the situations that dictaged "thinking in visual form." Our goal will be to understand the nature of myth as a universal category of thought alongside the power of images in the past and present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 003 Remembrance of Things Past? Social Memory in Greece and Rome.

Instructor(s): Susan Alcock (salcock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do societies remember? And what do they forget? This seminar will examine how societies create their own memories (and histories), as well as exploring the power of the past in the present. We will begin the course by discussing contemporary issues in 'memory studies' (the alternative 'counter-memories' created by race and gender; the significance of war or Holocaust memorials). Experiments in testing 'social memories' among peers and family are planned. Most of the seminar, however, will be taken up with the world of ancient Greece and Rome; the evidence of textual, art historical and archaeological sources will all be explored. Specific topics will include the ancient 'arts of memory' (techniques by which people worked to remember such things as oratorical displays), the commemoration of the dead and of heroes, and the setting up of public monuments to admired men or women (and, conversely, acts such as damnatio memoriae, in which statues were decapitated and memories erased!).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 004 Barbarians: The Greek and Roman Perceptions of their Foreign Neighbors.

Instructor(s): Patrick McFadden (mcfaddep@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Greeks and the Romans saw the world as consisting of themselves on the one hand and of hordes of barbarians on the other. This course will examine how the Greeks and later the Romans viewed race and ethnicity, how they portrayed barbarians in their literature and art, and how they mingled with and sometimes incorporated barbarians into their societies. The approach will be interdisciplinary, and students will be asked to evaluate the evidence of language, literature, epigraphy, art, and architecture. The course will cover over 800 years of Greek and Roman history and include such diverse groups as the Persians described by Herodotus and the Goths influential in the time of Ammianus Marcellinus. There will be significant time devoted to the portrayal of influential figures, like the Egyptian queen Cleopatra in Augustan Rome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 005 Pagans and Christians in the Roman World.

Instructor(s): John Shean (jfshean@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~jfshean/

This seminar examines the growth of Christianity within the Roman empire during the first five centuries CE. We will concentrate on the relations between the Christian, Pagan and Jewish communities during this period, and, in particular, the attitude of the Roman government towards the new Christian sect. Were relations among the various religious communities hostile or was there toleration of different religious beliefs? How severe and persistent was the persecution of Christians by Roman civil authorities? Did Roman policy vary in different parts of the empire? We will also discuss the impact of the conversion of Constantine to Christianity and the change this brought in the position of the Christian church within the Roman state. Did the Christian community use their newly privileged status to suppress Pagan practices? How 'Christian' were the Christians? What influence did Pagan culture have on Christianity? What difference did Christianity make on Roman society?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 215. Ovid.

Section 001, 002 Meets Oct. 26-Dec. 9 (Drop/Add deadline=November 8).

Instructor(s): Ruth Scodel (rscodel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (HU).

Foriegn Lit Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rscodel/ovid.html

Ovid has been among the most influential writers in the European literary tradition, and he is one of the most enjoyable authors in the canon. This mini-seminar will examine both the original contexts of his works and what he has meant for later readers, with emphasis on the love poetry and the "Metamorphoses." Themes will include his treatment of women and sexuality, his narrative technique and wit, his relationships with Augustus and with Roman power, his presentation of self, and whatever aspects the group finds most interesting. We will look at both recent adaptations, including Ted Hughes' "Tales from Ovid" and the collection "After Ovid," and Elizabethan translations, including Golding's "Metamorphoses" (which Shakespeare used) and Christopher Marlowe's "Amores." We will also look (briefly) at paintings based on Ovidian themes from the Renaissance to the present. There will be two short papers and oral reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Class. Civ. 456. Egypt after the Pharaohs: Public and Private Life in an Ancient Multicultural Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Traianos Gagos (traianos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course aims to study a major ancient culture that is not consistently represented in the traditional core curriculum for the study of ancient Mediterranean societies. The focus is reversed towards one of the major ancient cultures that has fascinated both the ancient super-powers of Greece and Rome and the moderns alike with its peculiar gods and mysterious religious practices. Our study will move beyond anachronistic stereotypes to deal with Egypt as an ancient multicultural society where Egyptians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Jews, and other cultural groups co-existed for more than a millennium. In a time of rapid change the study of civilizations with roots radically different from our own can provide an interesting form of reorientation. And a multicultural society, such as Egypt, that managed to survive for centuries on principles we no longer share presents something of a challenge. Egypt offers great advantages in the exploration of what we want to think of as "contemporary" issues, such as ethnicity, class, gender, and social mobility. The arid climate of the desert has preserved several thousands of documents on papyrus in Greek, Egyptian, and other alphabets which span over a millennium after the conquest of Egypt by Alexander the Great. The survival of such a corpus of "raw" data provides a unique gateway for an intimate look into the spheres of public and private life in Egypt, the complexity of the Egyptian culture, and its interface with the Greeks and the Romans, as well as modes of reaction to foreign rule. Egypt was the oldest and most prestigious culture known to the Greeks, and it impressed many of the ancient Greek writers. This course has an exemplary rather than a comprehensive aim: after an historical and geographic orientation, the study will proceed with case studies in a diachronic form on concrete themes such as life in the towns and the countryside, ethnicity, gender, religion, army and administration, social mobility. The planned readings will include recent secondary work as well as primary texts in translation. Requirements will include three critical papers of 6-10 pages each.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 460/WS 460. Theorizing Women in Antiquity.

Section 001 De-creation: How Women like Saphho, Perpetua, Hrosvita, Heloise, Marguerite Porete, Emily Dickinson and Simone Weil Tell God. Meets with Institute for the Humanities 411.001 and 511.001, English 526.001, and College Honors 493.001.

Instructor(s): Anne Carson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Institute for the Humanities 411.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Class. Civ. 462. Greek Mythology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Derek Collins

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~classics/cc/462-f99/

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the principal Greek myths as they developed in Greek and Roman literature. We shall also move beyond narrative to consider the ways in which classical myths have been interpreted by both ancient and modern commentators. We will discuss the many contexts in which Greeks and Romans retold their myths, including song, dramatic performance, written literature, and plastic arts such as sculpture and painting. Required reading will include Hesiod's Theogony and Works and Days, Homer's Odyssey, the Homeric Hymns, selected tragdies from Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and Ovid's Metamorphoses. An additional course pack will provide further readings for discussion sections which will meet once a week to consider a theoretical approaches to myth, and other critical questions. Course requirements include two hour tests and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Class. Civ. 466/Rel. 468. Greek Religion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ludwig Koenen (koenen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We shall understand Greek religion as a traditional language, narrated in myth and performed in rituals, in which from prehistory to the cities of the fourth century Greeks understood their world and negotiated the realities, fears, and hopes of their lives and communities. The course will not offer a survey but, in comparative approaches, explore basic human concepts as they appear in selected topics (such as progressive and cyclic time, transcendence of sacred time and space in ritual performance, cosmogony, death and rebirth, chaos and renewal of social order, sacrifices, civic religion, the ecstatic body and mind, initiations) and a few paradigmatic gods, including Dionysos, the god of boundless contradictions. We shall confront the otherness of Greek culture as well as common humane experiences still relevant for the understanding of ourselves and modern societies. Lectures and regular discussions. Students will be graded on papers (several short and one of 8-10 pages) as well as on their participation in discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1-2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 473. Roman Decadence.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles Witke (frchas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course surveys and analyzes the phenomenon of decadence in the Roman world from the beginnings of the Roman Empire to the fourth century. Works read (in English translation) include Vergil's Aeneid, Ovid, Petronius, Seneca, Juvenal, Apuleius, Augustine, and others. Areas of concern include literature, society, religion and philosophy as they undergo crisis and conflict in an age of anxiety. Hour examination, final examination. Lecture and discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

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