Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in English (Division 361)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for English.


A complete up to date listing of English Department course descriptions can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/.

For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department (764-6330).

WRITING COURSES:

After taking or placing out of Introductory Composition, students may elect either English 224 or 225 for further practice in the fundamentals of expository and argumentative prose. English 325 offers the opportunity for work in argumentative and expository prose at a more advanced level.

Several sections of English 223, the beginning course in creative writing, are available each term. The work is multi-generic, and two of the following will be covered in each section: fiction, poetry, and drama, or you may take English 227 (Introductory Playwriting). A more advanced course for creative writers is English 323 (Fiction or Poetry), which is available after completion of the prerequisite, English 223. More experienced writers may apply for admission to specialized sections of English 327 (Playwriting), English 423 (Fiction), English 427 (Advanced Playwriting), and English 429 (Poetry). Admission to these advanced courses is by permission of the instructor, who may require writing samples.

INDEPENDENT STUDY:

Independent study in English must be elected under one of the following numbers: 226 (Directed Writing, 1-3 hours), 299 (Directed Reading, 1-3 hours), 426 (Directed Writing, 1-4 hours), 499 (Directed Reading, 1-4 hours). There is a limit to the total hours that may be taken under any one number. Students interested in independent study should obtain an application from the English Department office on the third floor of Angell Hall. Independent study proposals must be approved by a supervising professor and by the Undergraduate Chair of the department. The deadline for Independent Study in the Winter Term 1998 is January 16, 1998.

English 350 & 351

This two-term sequence is designed to give students a principled sense of the range of literary works written in English; the first term will characteristically deal with works produced before the later seventeenth century to the time of Milton, that is; the second term will begin at that point and proceed to the present. These courses will be open to English concentrators and to non-concentrators alike.

English 370, 371, & 372

Each of these courses will range over the materials of the periods indicated below in one or more of a variety of ways. Some may be multi-generic surveys; some may focus on the development during the period of specific genres; some may be topical, others formal in their principle of organization. All sections will emphasize the development of student skill in writing essays analyzing the materials and evaluating the approaches in question.


Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

By connecting the two terms of its title, Writing and Literature aims to help prepare the student to produce the range and quality of expository prose expected in college courses. Works of literature will be considered for their effective use of language and argument. They will serve as reference points for thinking and writing strategies. Characteristically, sections of English 124 will involve the writing of a minimum of five essays, with considerate attention given to the preparation of drafts and to revision. The literary works which will serve as points of reference will vary from section to section and from term to term. Section descriptions for courses not listed below can be found on the department's Web page (http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/courses/f99/f99courses/124cds.htm).

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 001, 016.

Instructor(s): Hutton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This introductory writing course will use three plays by Shakespeare as texts with which to practice and refine our reading and writing skills. The reading load is light so that we can concentrate our attention all the more on the subtleties and implications of a writer's technique both Shakespeare's and our own. By the end of the semester we will have greatly improved our ability to read and interpret difficult texts with confidence and originality, and we will have written essays with a deepened understanding of how to build a sophisticated argument and use evidence effectively. Students will be expected to write and rigorously revise four papers of varying lengths; the course work will also include small group workshops, peer evaluations, and in-class writing assignments.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Herold

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The short version is that we will read some really good books, talk about them, write about them. Your interests will shape the course as much as mine. Mine include narrative, point of view, voice, and style. The work will be as student centered as possible expect no lectures, but plenty of group assignments.

Course texts may include, subject to availability, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Room with a View, Mr. Vertigo, Snow Falling on Cedars, as well as a slim course pack with a few short stories. We will also need a handbook.

Required work includes faithful and enthusiastic attendance and participation, two short exercises, three papers (with revisions) in the 3-6 page range, and one formal presentation.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Murnen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Cooley

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 006 Language/Logic.

Instructor(s): Spirn

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What can we learn about about a person based on the way he or she speaks, writes, and reasons? Does language reflect a person's identity, or does it mask it? In this course, we will attempt to answer these questions by examining texts that explore people's use of language. Students will also examine their own use of language and reasoning in their written assignments. The goal of the course will be to develop strong academic writing skills and critical reading skills. We will read texts from a variety of genres novels, poems, plays, short stories, and essays that will help us examine and question the structure and language of our own essay writing. Authors may include J.D. Salinger, Alice Walker, David Mamet, and others. By the end of the term you can expect to have completed 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 007 The Art of Persuasion.

Instructor(s): Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This composition class uses the study of literature to aid us in our approach to writing sophisticated, polished prose and helps to develop our ability to think analytically. In this course we will read some of literature's greatest moments of persuasion: Romeo's attempt to persuade Juliet to kiss him, Satan's ability to persuade Eve in Paradise Lost, or Swift's proposal that eating children might alleviate social ills (to name only a few). How does a writer persuade (or deceive) us into loving what we would otherwise detest, and detesting what we anally love. How does persuasion "work"? You will learn to write persuasively in this course by learning to improve your sense of audience, tone, voice, and style (among other features of writing). We will write in every class meeting, turn in weekly assignments, and learn to revise your work. By the end of the term you can expect to have completed 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 008 Literature of War: America in the 20th Century.

Instructor(s): Laskowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The literature of the course critically examines war and its effects on combatants and non-combatants, in the battlefield and at home. Readings: Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms; Silko, Ceremony; Guterson, Snow Falling on Cedars; O'Brien, The Things They Carried; Gray, The Warriors: Reflections on Men in Battle. Film: Stone, Platoon; Keen, Faces of the Enemy.

Requirements:

  1. Class attendance, homework preparation, & participation in class discussion. Students who are unprepared will not be given full credit for attending class. The class is not television. After the third absence, the final grade is lowered one-half a grade level for each additional absence.
  2. Four 5-7 page argumentative essays citing researched evidence of at least two differing points of view. Shorter essays or insufficient research will receive appropriately lower grades.
  3. Eighteen 1-2 page critiques of other students' essays.
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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 009, 038 Narrative, Argument, and Suspense.

Instructor(s): Rubinstein, Glass

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Good writing depends on asking good questions, and making these questions interesting to your reader. It's also crucial to keep the reader's attention as you provide compelling answers. Powerful writing does these things by creating suspense, revealing information gradually, and withholding it at the right moments. Many narratives or arguments lead up to a final revelation, a climax, but a non-linear, even fragmented structure can be just as fascinating. Creating a compelling academic argument often involves the same processes as writing a suspenseful narrative. In this course, we'll explore the various ways in which writers create and hold their readers' interest, and students will work towards different understandings of how structure creates meaning. We'll read some classic suspense narratives, which may include stories by A. Conan Doyle, Poe, Wharton, and Shirley Jackson. We may also study Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and/ or Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express. By the end of the term you can expect to have completed 20-30 ages of revised, polished prose.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Buchanan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course foregrounds literature; however, it is a course about writing. Hence, we will make use of literary works to facilitate discussions of issues of writing. We will read novels and stories that reflect on childhood and adolescence and that bring questions of race, class, and identity to the surface. You will then be asked to write on similar topics. Expectations for written work include: two 5-7 page essays, two 3-5 page essays, and at least ten 1 page papers. You will also be asked to keep a reading journal. Reading might include Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, Kaye Gibbon's Ellen Foster, stories by Sandra Cisneros and Mark Richard, and William Faulkner's Absalom Absalom.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 012, 032.

Instructor(s): Thompson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 013 The City and the Country: Explore Places in Literature.

Instructor(s): Vala

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How are places important in literature and why should we care about setting? This course will explore the way various places both rural and urban, American and British function in late-nineteenth and twentieth-century texts. I hope to explore primarily the differences between the rural community and the bustling metropole: What are the experiences of the individual in each of these settings? How are places defined by the communities that inhabit them? To what extent does place itself become a character? From William Faulkner's depiction of Mississippi to James Joyce's portrayal of Dublin, literary places will provide the framework for you to improve your writing. Beginning on the level of word choice and sentence structure, we shall move in stages towards our ultimate goal: argumentative literary analysis. Texts may include Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio, James Joyce's Dubliners; short stories by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Oscar Wilde, and Flannery O'Connor; and poetry by Frank O'Hara and T.S. Eliot. Active participation is required. By the end of the term you will have written 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Gorman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Writing and the ability to write effectively will shape the nature of your academic college experience. The skill of writing is necessary for whatever discipline you may pursue, whether that be in the humanities or sciences. If you are able to construct arguments and explain your positions convincingly using evidence, then you will be adequately equipped with the tools required for undergraduate success.

In this course, we will be reading novels, essays and poetry that focus upon the ideas of travel and writing. Through examining these novels and the ways in which they present their ideas, we will work towards understanding what makes style and language so crucial and so difficult. You will gain a great amount of experience in writing, revising, and critiquing papers. In class we will discuss what makes writing strong or weak (i.e., rhetorical devices, language, argumentation) through the examples of the novels and student -written papers with the aim of understanding what makes an excellent paper. We will focus on the revising of written work through workshopping sessions in small groups as well as in a larger setting. The writing and reasoning skills that you will utilize in this class will be useful in all the courses you will take at the University of Michigan. You can expect to produce between 20-30 pages of polished prose by the end of the semester.

Novels may include As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner, Dark Child by Camara Laye and Travels with Charley by John Steinbeck. We will also be reading short articles on writing and crafting essays.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 016.

Instructor(s): Hutton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.001.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 017.

Instructor(s): Dreiser

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 019, 066 Literature and Loss.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Egger (egger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the ways in which twentieth-century writers have dealt with the issues of loss and death, and with the challenges of living in a world bounded by the fact of mortality. Because all living persons are, by definition, alive (!), writing about death becomes an exercise in probing the unimaginable, the traumatic, and the taboo. By examining the strategies that authors have developed to discuss this most elusive of subjects, we will explore and write frequently about such issues as mourning, memory, human connectedness, and the responsibility of the living to the dead. We will focus our study on three novels (Toni Morrison's Beloved, William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, and Kate Phillips' White Rabbit) and one nonfictional account (Elie Wiesel's Night). Students will write four papers (4-6 pp.) and revise one. Though our subject is weighty, conversation should be lively and engaged; to that end, students should come to each class prepared to participate in discussion.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 020 Reading and Writing about Gender and Genre.

Instructor(s): Bachmann

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is a man? What is a woman? How do writings in a number of genres represent, construct, and question the category of gender? Students will practice skills in critical thinking, close reading, and argumentative and expressive writing through intensive engagement with a variety of texts dealing with issues of masculinity and femininity, male and female roles, and identity. Examining fiction, essays, memoir, poetry, and drama, we will look at a wide range of interpretations and representations of this social category. Students will write 4-5 short papers, complete a number of informal writing assignments, and participate in class discussion about readings. Texts may include Virginia Woolf, Orlando; Tom Spanbauer, The Man who Fell in Love with the Moon; Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body; Kate Bornstein, Gender Outlaw; essays by Jay Prosser, Gayle Rubin, Judith Butler, Will Roscoe, and Freud; and poetry by Walt Whitman, Marlon Riggs, and Judy Grahn.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 021, 031.

Instructor(s): Fluhr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 022, 030.

Instructor(s): Heininger

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As a framing theme, this course investigates the ways in which otherness and others (children, the poor, the undereducated, foreigners, exiles, non-middle-class Americans generally) are imagined in contemporary fiction. The goals of the course are to teach you methods of reading stories so as to develop your skills in attentive reading, critical thinking, an written analysis. Our readings and essays will focus on selected stories and novels from the United States, Canada, England, and Ireland. There will be short and long writing assignments amounting to approximately 30 pages of writing.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 023, 036 Literature and Psychology.

Instructor(s): Whitworth

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Basic introduction to literary interpretation and the critical writing about literature, with an emphasis on the psychology of short fiction. Students will be expected to write three to four 4-6 page papers as well as several shorter response papers. Required texts: Hawthorne's Short Stories, The Turn of the Screw and Other Short Novels, Stories by Katherine Mansfield, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Seven Gothic Tales, Online! A Reference Guide to Using Internet Sources, The Little Brown Essential Handbook.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 024.

Instructor(s): Meier

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 025 Public and Private Spaces.

Instructor(s): Amanda Watson (alwatson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~alwatson/eng124.html

What separates personal spaces our homes, the inner space of memory from the world at large? Why is a "sense of place" important for so many writers? Through readings centered around questions like these, this course will introduce you to writing about literature. We'll visit writers' private spaces (Annie Dillard's Cabin, Virginia Woolf's Room of One's Own) and public landscapes (Joan Didion's L.A., Stuart Dybek's Chicago). In the process, we will find models for our own writing; we will discover how to "translate" the raw materials of our personal experience including our responses to literature into words, and eventually into finished work that we can be proud to show others. You can expect to undertake four formal writing assignments for a total of around 25 pages of revised prose. In-class workshops and informal assignments will take you through the writing process and encourage you to become self-aware readers and revisers.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 026.

Instructor(s): K. Allen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 027 Why Fiction?.

Instructor(s): Vasquez

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Why do many people spend Thanksgiving watching The Wizard of Oz? Why do conversations often become discussions of Jerry Seinfeld or William Shakespeare or Steven King? Why have more people written about Jane Austen's novels than the Bible? In this class we will explore how fiction seems to work: goals of authors, expectations of audiences, and how fictional content and structures often comment on the content and structure of human lives. We will read novels such as Sandra Cisneros' The House on Mango Street, John Fowles' The French Lieutenant's Woman, and Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried. We will also read short stories by James Baldwin, Raymond Carver, John Cheever, Scott Fitzgerald, Charlotte Gilman, and Dorothy Parker, as well as nonfiction writings by Donald Murray, John Thurber, and Alice Walker. We will create similarly diverse sorts of writings: journal entries, responses to peer journal entries, fiction, and nonfiction. We will do a great deal of informal writing and multiple drafts of four more formal papers. We will discuss student informal and formal writings in small groups, large groups, and during several student/teacher conferences. This course will also ask that students work as hard on developing their class discussion skills as they work on developing their writing a satisfying college career depends on being highly competent in both these arenas.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 028 Literature and Geography.

Instructor(s): Tischler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will consider how twentieth-century writers represent places. Descriptions of landmarks and well-known places help to orient readers as they make their way through a novel. Conversely, literary evocations of maps can also disorient readers as they ask us to look at places in new ways. For example, Gertrude Stein invites us to consider how America would appear if viewed through a magnifying glass; Virginia Woolf imagines flying over London and seeing it from above. We will discover how representations of places are linked to gender, sexuality, and geopolitics. Our readings will include works by James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, Edith Wharton, and Virginia Woolf. You will be expected to submit weekly response papers and to write four essays.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 029 Composition as Explanation.

Instructor(s): Wood

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

I conceive of this course as a series of exercises in thinking as much as in writing. To speak of writing and literature is already to confront preconceptions we have about what each of these terms means, particularly as they relate to ideas about ourselves and our reality. As students in a major American (and public) university, you are being asked to think and write in a variety of ways that reflect the different environments in which you live and work. We will think about how language both creates and is created by these environments, but at the same time gives us the means to question and perhaps overcome some of the differences between, for example, the kind of writing we do in an Engineering class and the kind of writing we do in an English class. This kind of questioning will allow us to develop some important definitions of both writing and literature, especially as those terms have come to have particular meanings for us through history. What's the relationship between the invention of printing and the idea that a poem expresses the personal emotions or thoughts of the poet? How can we talk about freedom in writing when we still have grammar? These are just some of the questions you can expect to explore this term as we consider what language is and how it works, and why it is not just a simple "tool" of communication in the way we are often led to believe. We will read a generous selection of texts both ancient and modern, with a special focus on writing being produced in our contemporary, allegedly "post-modern" world. Class time will be a mixture of both lecture and discussion, with a heavy measure of group critique and public debate about issues, ideas, and particular examples of student writing. Participation is a strong element of the course grade, as it is through sharing ourselves, our beliefs about and our approaches to writing, that we will further our understanding of who we are and how and why we write. Course requirements will include: mandatory attendance and participation, group workshop activities in which students will share their writing with each other and provide guided feedback for revision, occasional in-class writing, several short writing assignments, and three longer papers. The emphasis is on BOTH process and product, and student work on these papers will include prewriting activities, a finished draft (graded separately), and a final revision.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 030.

Instructor(s): Heininger

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.022.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 031.

Instructor(s): Fluhr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.021.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 032.

Instructor(s): Thompson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.012.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 034 The Art of Interpretation.

Instructor(s): Moses

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will read works of literature which deal with interpreting a culture, locale, and/or group of people to a "larger" audience. Readings will include short stories, poems, and novels by such nineteenth and twentieth century writers as Henry James, Charles Chesnutt, Sarah Orne Jewett, Kate Chopin, Paul Laurence Dunbar, James Whitcomb Riley, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, and Amy Tan. We will use this literature to help you think about and practice writing as an act of interpretation. Writing assignments will be based on close readings of a text, but should also integrate outside resources and engage in the broader issues raised by a reading. Assignments will include one-page response papers to all of the reading assignments, two 4 to 6 page papers and two 5 to 7 page papers. You will also be expected to revise at least two of your longer papers and to participate actively in class discussions.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 035.

Instructor(s): Cicciarelli

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this section we will use contemporary literature to provoke classroom discussion and stimulate student writing. We will read four short novels, a collection of short stories and a volume of poetry, as well as various shorter pieces of fiction and non-fiction. Texts may include The Branch Will Not Break, Jesus' Son, Housekeeping, The Bluest Eye, Bone, High Fidelity, Into the Great Wide Open and Mystery Ride. We will use a workshop format to critique student essays and create a collaborative writing environment that will encourage the exploration and development of our individual voices. Active class participation will be a vital component of our work. While developing critical thinking and argumentation skills in our discussions, we will learn to make our writing a clear, persuasive account of our ideas and beliefs. This class will provide you with both technical skills and an awareness of the various forces that work upon the effect of your writing. Students will be expected to complete four revised essays of various lengths and several one-page response papers.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 036 Literature and Psychology.

Instructor(s): Whitworth

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.023.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 037 Educations of the Self.

Instructor(s): McDonnell

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on developing your ability to interpret, discuss, and write about literary texts. We will read texts, primarily fiction and non-fiction, that investigate the relationship between education, writing, and ourselves. How does literature "teach" us to see our world and who we are? In what ways does our education affect our earlier relationships to familiar people and places? As we read authors and works such as Richard Rodriguez's Hunger of Memory, Tillie Olson's "I Stand Here Ironing," and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper, you will flex and tone your own analytical, oral, and writing skills. Peer revision and workshops are a central component of the class. These activities will help you acquire a sense of your own writing style and its particular strengths and weaknesses, in addition to improving crucial editing and revision skills in a collaborative environment. Assignments will include three revised essays of varying lengths (including one 7-10 page paper) in addition to peer critique, short written responses, and active participation.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 038 Narrative, Argument, and Suspense.

Instructor(s): Rubinstein, Glass

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.038.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 039 Not for Bedtime: Storytelling in African-American Literature.

Instructor(s): Mitchell

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Who tells stories? To whom? Why are they told? How do we analyze stories written by others? These are some of the questions we will answer in this composition course. We will use storytelling as a critical approach to the audience, content and form of writing. African-American literature is a rich source of stories in a variety of forms (folktales, fiction, plays, and poetry) from which we will draw. Our readings will include stories from Charles Chesnutt and Zora Neale Hurston, and more contemporary works such as Edwidge Danticat's Krik? Krak! and Ntozake Shange's for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf. While there will be much spirited discussion of the readings, our main focus will be the writing process itself. You will complete weekly reader responses (one to two pages) examining major themes, characterizations, and writing styles of the literature; four formal, revised essays (from three to eight pages); and several in-class writing exercises. By the end of this course you should be able to write more clearly and confidently, and with increased complexity, about a range of texts and ideas.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 040.

Instructor(s): Salchak

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 041 Exploring the Mysterious in Our Worlds, in Ourselves.

Instructor(s): Krista Homicz (khomicz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/1999/fall/lsa/enll/124/041.nsf

Are you fascinated by the mysterious? How can we begin to talk about the mysterious events or occurrences that happen in the world around us, or about the mysterious feelings that you find in yourself? Join our discussion as we test our perceptions of reality and analyze our views of the unreal. We're going to investigate the unusual settings, strange characters, surreal events, and fantastic images conjured up by writers from different cultures and time periods. And, hopefully, in developing our ability to interpret the mysterious in literature through class discussions, we can find ways to interpret the mysterious in ourselves and our worlds in our own writing. For this journey into the mysterious, we will read and discuss a mix of literary genres which touch upon the peculiar, the unknown, or the supernatural. Some readings may stem from legends and folktales from African, Asian, Celtic, Mayan, and Native American folklore. Most of the readings will be from a selection of short stories with mysterious twists and problems (which may include Barth's Lost in the Funhouse, Poe's The Fall of the House of Usher, Borges' Pierre Menard, Author of Don Quixote, or others by Camus, Márquez, Hawthorne, Welty, Silko, and Wharton), and a few novels by authors who write about mysterious presences in different cultures (which may include Carlos Fuentes in Aura, Toni Morrison in Beloved, Henry James in The Turn of the Screw, and Maxine Hong Kingston in The Woman Warrior). Our writing and analysis will speculate on the social and psychological implications found within these works (for example, what our fears tell us about ourselves, and how we explain or understand the mysterious in our lives). Be prepared to share your thoughts and your writing with other students so that we can consider what you and other students find mysterious and fascinating. Course requirements include reading, participating actively in class discussion and collaborative discussion and writing work, writing in-class and out-of-class responses to reading, and writing and revising four formal papers.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 042 Crisis in Writing.

Instructor(s): Amoko

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is good writing? What assumptions regarding context, appropriateness, and effectiveness have to be in place before we can begin to answer this question? This course will use a diverse range of texts addressing both real and fictional crises in an attempt to come to terms with this question. What rhetorical choices do writers employ in order to convey a sense of crisis (both real and imagined)? Our working hypothesis will be that the effectiveness of any writing is more a function of its rhetorical force than its specific substantive content (as important and compelling as that content may be). My goal will be to provide you with a sense of the range of choices available to you in your own writing. The writers to be studied will include Jonathan Swift, Flannery O'Connor, Joy Kogawa, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Franz Fanon, Stanley Fish, and William Safire. You can expect to write 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose by the end of the term.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 046, 047.

Instructor(s): Kingsley

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Among the many types of stories out there in literature-land, the ones we best relate to often have as their subject the messy business of growing up. "Literary types" call this the "coming of age" motif, and it's this which we will be exploring in our reading of not-what-you'd-expect novels, stories, memoir, and drama. Many, but not all, of these selections share the setting of student life, something which we should relate to even more. We will be journaling our responses to the readings, writing several one to two page pieces, and completing a variety of non-traditional assignments, but emphasis will be on developing reading and writing skills so that when we enter into each literary experience, we have with us a full kit of tools with which to talk about it. To that end a 3-5 page paper, a 5-7 page paper, and one 10-page paper will also be required.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 053 Film and Society.

Instructor(s): Alan Howes (ahowes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will view eight films by major directors, all of which deal with political or social issues, as the basis for discussion and writing. The earliest film is D.W. Griffith's Intolerance (1916), the latest, Akira Kurosawa's Rhapsody in August (1991). Other directors and films include: Charles Chaplin, Monsieur Verdoux; John Ford, The Grapes of Wrath; Orson Welles, Citizen Kane; Stanley Kubrick, Dr. Strangelove; Francis Ford Coppola, Apocalypse Now; and David Lean, A Passage to India. We will also read some of the sources for these films. Frequent writing with opportunities for revision. Paper topics will be drawn both from the films themselves (e.g., the styles of different directors), and from some of the issues they deal with.

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Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 066 Literature and Loss.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Egger (egger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.019.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No one ever finishes learning to write, so this course focuses on helping students further develop their unique potentials as writers, readers, and thinkers. By analyzing texts from a variety of academic disciplines, students will come to understand the conventions writers follow to present their ideas effectively to their chosen audiences. What rhetorical strategies are common in different disciplines and why? How and when might we use those strategies in our own writing? For instance, what writing strategies would we call upon for a lab report, and would we use any of those strategies for a philosophical speculation, a history exam, a love letter? Throughout the term, students will work to identify the writing skills they most need to develop, and they'll invent and refine a personal style of expression that can be adapted to different audiences and purposes. Course requirements include at least 40 pages of writing, including at least 20 pages of revised, polished prose. Section descriptions for courses not listed below can be found on the department's Web page (http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/courses/f99/f99courses/125cds.htm).

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 001 Writing for College and Beyond.

Instructor(s): Widmayer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

You've just won the lottery, and you can look forward to a life working for yourself. Now you've decided to write your autobiography but without a ghostwriter because you've seen what they've done to the lives of your famous friends. This course will teach you the skills to make your writing interesting and effective for a wide variety of audiences and maybe even get your autobiography published later on! In this section, we will read challenging essays by writers such as Annie Dillard, Langston Hughes, Amy Tan, bell hooks, Jonathan Swift, Virginia Woolf, and Stephen Jay Gould in our quest to find out how each writer makes their writing worth publishing by anticipating and manipulating their audiences' reactions. Course requirements will include participating in class or small-group discussions, writing four essays with a mandatory rewriting of the first to start the salutary habit of rewriting, completing two library projects, and formulating critiques of your classmates' and your own writing.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 002, 004, 045.

Instructor(s): Daphne Swabey (swabey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~swabey/

The goal of this course is to introduce students to academic writing, which can be defined as an ongoing conversation between people who enjoy exchanging ideas, finding out new ways of understanding problems, and developing their own intellectual muscle. Academic writing is therefore conversational, often questioning frequently skeptical, and sometimes downright exciting. By the end of this course students will understand how to apply the rhetorical strategies involved in replying to other academics in concise, well-developed, carefully crafted prose. There will be a minimum of four papers, as well as a weekly one-page paper on the reading assignments. Revision will be emphasized through the writing and rewriting of drafts. Participation is a vital part of the course, as is consistent attendance, and unflagging spirits. See www-personal.umich.edu/~swabey.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Flores

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Daphne Swabey (swabey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~swabey/

See English 125.002.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 005, 023.

Instructor(s): Herold

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The central purpose of this class is to teach you to recognize the problems in your writing on your own. To that end, you will write several drafts of your papers, subjecting them to various kinds of peer critique. Thus the most important text in the course will be your own papers. Our topics will be supplied by Our Times, a collection of magazine articles on various contemporary subjects.

Just for a change of pace, we will also read a novel, Snow Falling on Cedars on and off through the term.

Course texts: A writing handbook, Our Times, Snow Falling on Cedars, a slim course pack.

Required work: Faithful and enthusiastic attendance and participation, detailed written peer critiques, 4 papers with revisions, in the 3-6 page range.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): C. Harrison

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Writing is a skill that takes practice. As with any skill, writing requires constant doing and redoing. Students will give and receive peer criticism as well as comments from the instructor. They will learn to communicate their thoughts clearly and logically through journal entries, responses to reading assignments, and formal essays. The purpose of this course is twofold: to train students to think critically and analytically, and to guide them in expressing their thoughts through writing. Students will write and revise several papers of varying lengths. The total number of revised pages will number between 20 and 30. Essay topics will consist of argumentative subjects based on reading assignments as well as topics of the student's own choosing.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 007.

Instructor(s): Paterson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course aims to prepare eager students for essay writing at the college level. To accomplish this feat we will read and analyze works by experienced writers in order to determine writing strategies. In our own compositions on a variety of subjects, we will practice coming up with topics for essays, writing with an intended audience in mind, and creating persuasive and engaging prose. Along with reading and writing nonfiction, students can also expect peer critiques (written and verbal comments analyzing classmates' papers) to be an essential part of the class experience. Requirements will include class attendance and participation and several essays of varying lengths. By the end of the semester each student is expected to have compiled between 20 to 30 pages of revised, polished prose (which means, of course, that you will be writing more pages than that).

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): K. Bell

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

One will often hear two phrases associated with words: "Words are powerful" and "Words could never do it justice." The curious tension between these statements is where the joy of writing comes struggling with unwieldy phrases until they capture at least a fraction of your experience, until these frustrating words become one of your most immediate tools of communication. The goal of this class is to enable each student to express themselves with language. We will read essays by many thinkers, including Ralph Waldo Emerson, W.E.B. DuBois, Virginia Woolf, Alice Walker, and David Foster Wallace, and through group discussion and individual written reader responses analyze how these thinkers structure their ideas, what poetic imagery they use in their arguments, who they're arguing to, etc. Each student will complete 20-30 pages of prose during the semester through four paper assignments which will range in length from two to ten pages. Students will take part in in-class workshops of their own and their peers' writing, including written peer reviews, and take part in frequent in-class written exercises. Revisions will be required for every essay. The final essay will be a research paper focusing on issues of the student's choice, and each student will give a brief class presentation on their topics.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Rompf

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Burki

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Doshi

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is as much about reading as it is about writing. Reading a variety of non-fiction texts, students in this course will observe how different rhetorical modes operate within the different disciplines. While you will be introduced to the modes of argumentation deemed appropriate to the different disciplines, you will also be encouraged to develop your own style of writing, your "personal voice." In other words you will learn to experiment with your writing just as you will acclimate yourself to writing in different contexts, with sensitivity towards your audience. Class requirements include 4 papers of varying lengths, totalling 30-35 pages, short weekly response papers and written reviews of each other's work.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 012, 083.

Instructor(s): Kuhn

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 013.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will use reading as a way to practice and develop college writing skills. Working from the anthology Ways of Reading, we will focus on themes of writing in the "real" world, writing culture, and experimental writing "outside of the lines." Although our primary focus will be on the thesis-driven essay, this class will prepare students to meet the writing requirements of different disciplines. Four pieces of revised prose and several in-class writing assignments will be required.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 014, 017, 067.

Instructor(s): Csengeri

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 015, 041.

Instructor(s): Cooley

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 016, 018, 092.

Instructor(s): Su

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will develop and refine skills of critical reasoning and writing. In our increasingly competitive economy, the ability to write clear, convincing prose is more and more necessary for advancement in any field. This involves firstly analyzing, synthesizing, and responding to others' texts. From this basis, one shapes and develops individual perspectives in sentences, paragraphs, and essays.

Revision will be the keyword of the course. Together we will write, rewrite, and rewrite again. I firmly believe that learning as a community offers the best way for developing individual abilities. Accordingly, active class participation will be important. Throughout the semester we will read and constructively critique each other's work. In our interactions over the semester each of us will struggle to become a better thinker and to develop a unique and effective writing voice.

Course requirements include 5 formal papers (4-6 pp.), 10 short peer critiques, various informal writing exercises, and active class participation.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 017.

Instructor(s): Csengeri

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.014.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 018.

Instructor(s): Su

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.016.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 019 Secrets and Lies.

Instructor(s): Senders

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Pssst. Wanna know a secret? We'll be investigating the role of secrecy and lying in our lives and in the lives of others. We'll read, for example, about secrecy in the work of nuclear weapons scientists, initiation rituals in Melanesia, and American marriages. We'll also be asking and writing about the role of secrecy and lying in our everyday lives; how do we make sense of our experiences as liars, and how do we interpret the lying of others? Is secrecy antithetical or essential to democracy? How does lying influence "identity"? And what do we mean when we talk about "telling the truth"? Readings will include congressional hearings, anthropological accounts of secret societies, works of fiction, and sociological and literary theory. Expect to write 20-30 pages of revised, graded prose by the end of the term.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 020.

Instructor(s): Hwa

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Writing will be an integral part of almost every college course you take. Why not learn to do it well? This course is a step-by-step approach to building and refining your writing skills so you can craft effective, original, and polished prose for different academic contexts. By learning to respond critically and intelligently to everything you read, from published articles to work generated by the class, you will discover how to improve your writing through self-assessment, revision, and the input of your classmates. Requirements include conscientious attendance, informal response papers, in-class and take-home exercises, peer critiques, and essays (and drafts) of varying lengths. You will leave with 20-30 pages of revised prose and approaches to writing that will serve you throughout your college career and beyond. This is a collaborative effort, so bring coffee (if you need it) and an eagerness to participate!

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 021.

Instructor(s): Cosgrove

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 022 Education and Identity: Examining the College Experience.

Instructor(s): J. Johnson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

I hope that we find this course to be both worthwhile and enjoyable. I look forward to our discussion and evaluations of the diverse purposes, practices, and philosophies of the collegiate experience. As a college student, you are already an authority on many of the topics we will cover. Specifically, we will consider popular perspectives of the college experience, debates over the curriculum, intellectual development, and developing a sense of belonging in college.

In addition to examining the college experience, entering, understanding, and succeeding in the discourse community of collegiate writers is central to this course. And, we must bear in mind that developing strong argumentative writing skills is a messy, non-linear process. We will often find ourselves examining and revising thoughts we had previously found to be sound and complete. Some of our initial theses may evolve into wildly different notions by the end of the semester or even by our second or third drafts. In order to be better writers, we have to be more complex thinkers. And, through writing, revision, and collaboration with each other, we will learn to express more complicated thoughts in coherent fashion

Finally, I feel that there is a good deal of "truth" in the statement, "you get out of college what you put into it." Hopefully, this class will get you off to a good start in deciding how you are going to get what you want out of your college career.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 023.

Instructor(s): Herold

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.005.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 024, 034, 047.

Instructor(s): O'Keefe

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This composition course will focus on critical thinking, reading, and writing, with an emphasis on the ethics of written discourse. The course entails identifying and exploring ethical questions involving such topics as civil rights, the media, and the educational system. We will practice identifying multiple points of view on an issue; generating and developing our own perspectives and positions; articulating our thoughts in convincing sentences, paragraphs, and essays; and summarizing, documenting, and responding to others' texts responsibly. Peer revision groups will study numerous pieces of writing, some by professional writers, many by classmates. In the process, we will develop effective rhetorical techniques relating to purpose, audience, organization, style, evidence, and academic conventions. Assignments will include four formal, revised essays of varying lengths (3-8 pages), peer critiques of each formal paper, several shorter exploratory papers, in-class exercises, and large and small group discussions.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 025, 032, 042.

Instructor(s): Meyer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 026.

Instructor(s): Whitworth

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

ENG 125 aims to help you find ways to make your writing more dynamic, polished, and persuasive. By the end of the course, you should have improved your ability to communicate your ideas clearly and effectively to an audience of college-educated adults. My hope is that over the course of this semester you'll come to think of writing as an incessant process of rereading and revision rather than as an attempt to produce a perfect, finished product in one or two sittings. You will, consequently, receive intensive instruction and practice in writing five fully developed and revised essays. Your classmates and I will help you learn to analyze your audience; to discover which of the many prewriting techniques works best for you; to organize and develop ideas in a coherent, unified structure; and to revise, rewrite, and edit your own work. You will also receive a thorough grammar review and gain a familiarity with MLA, APA, and Chicago-style documentation conventions for essays using secondary sources. Required texts: Online! A Reference Guide to Using Internet Sources, The Little Brown Essential Handbook, The St. Martin's Guide to Writing.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 027, 033.

Instructor(s): Phoebe Jackson (pjack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/1999/fall/lsa/enll/125/027.nsf

This course will help you prepare for the type of thinking and writing that you will need to be successful at the university. Our first step will be to engage our thinking of critical issues by reading short non-fiction and fiction pieces. To improve your writing, you will write one-page reading responses for each article you read and four papers of polished prose of approximately 5-6 pages in length. All of your papers will go through multiple drafts before an individual paper is finalized. To increase your ability to analyze text and to help your peers improve their written communication, you will be expected to read and comment upon early drafts of their papers. Your final grade will be based upon active class participation (which includes reading responses, peer responses, and multiple drafting) and four formal essays.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 028.

Instructor(s): Loncar

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 029.

Instructor(s): Carroll

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 030, 073.

Instructor(s): Dreiser

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 031.

Instructor(s): Stanton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 032.

Instructor(s): Meyer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.025.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 033.

Instructor(s): Phoebe Jackson (pjack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/1999/fall/lsa/enll/125/033.nsf

See English 125.027.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 034.

Instructor(s): O'Keefe

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.024.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 038.

Instructor(s): Nelson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 039 Writing as Revision.

Instructor(s): Spring

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Have I said it before? I am learning to see. Yes, I am beginning. It's still going badly. But I intend to make the most of my time." R.M. Rilke

How do we begin to take part in academic and professional discourses? This class will explore how to enter such discourses through our reading, thinking and writing. These three acts require that we see and re-see, that we participate in the fundamental act of re-vision (of "seeing again"), in order to open spaces within established arguments and then expand them through personal and interdisciplinary analysis.

Coursework will include intensive, thoughtful reading of all assigned texts; an in-class and reader-response journal; active participation; faithful, early morning attendance; four essays and extensive revisions; and graded peer critiques and workshops.

Required Text: Ways of Reading: An Anthology for Writers, by D. Bartholomae and A. Petrosky.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 040.

Instructor(s): Sulzer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Dedicated to creative, coherent argumentative writing, our course will be time-consuming and expectations will be great. Texts will be political and philosophical in nature: radio reports, newspaper articles, documentaries, environmental essays, readings on American culture. We will talk throughout the semester about various approaches to argumentative writing, working together to discover the art of this form. Thirty pages of finished work and participation in regular peer reviews required.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 041.

Instructor(s): Cooley

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.015.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 042.

Instructor(s): Meyer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.025.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 043.

Instructor(s): P. O'Keeffe

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 044, 048 This section is restricted to students from the Michigan Community Scholars Program (formerly known as the 21st Century Program).

Instructor(s): Scott Kassner (skassner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~skassner/Eng125.html

This section of English 125, developed specifically for students enrolled in the new Michigan Community Scholars Program in Mary Markley Hall, will focus on writing within the context of community service. In addition to attending the course and doing course assignments, students will work for selected community groups as part of their Community Scholars Program community service commitment or as an additional commitment. Ideally, much of the students' writing will be done "for" the community groups in the form of newsletters, public relations announcements, reports, pamphlets, etc. Also, students will use writing to reflect upon their community service experience, and there will be reading and writing assignments that will ask students to consider community service learning within the context of contemporary American society and higher education. Students should be aware that the specifics of the course may change as the Community Scholars Program evolves.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 045.

Instructor(s): Daphne Swabey (swabey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~swabey/

See English 125.002.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 046.

Instructor(s): Roux

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 047.

Instructor(s): O'Keefe

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.024.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 048 This section is restricted to students from the Michigan Community Scholars Program (formerly known as the 21st Century Program).

Instructor(s): Scott Kassner (skassner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~skassner/Eng125.html

See English 125.044.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 049.

Instructor(s): Young

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will cover the fundamentals of effective college writing, with special attention to the thesis paragraph and the use of examples and evidence. We will use our reading assignments as models to analyze professional writers' styles and structures of argument. Through a series of four student papers, we will break down the writing process into its main components. Early in the term students will write and revise drafts in order to establish themselves as clear and confident college writers. By the end of the term you will have written 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 050.

Instructor(s): DeRoo

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to give you tools that will enable you to strengthen your general writing skills, both during the semester and long after you have completed the course. Regardless of your future ambitions, being able to write well is essential to your pursuits and goals. Nearly all vocations and fields of study require the ability to communicate your ideas and thoughts clearly and concisely on the page. Using peer critiques, workshops of your rough drafts, in-class exercises and assignments, and assigned readings by published essayists as bouncing boards for discussion and learning, we will explore different aspects of the essay form to sharpen your writing skills, including methods of structure and form, style, voice, and theme. Required work: 4 revised papers of 4-8 pages; peer critiques; summary-response questions to reading; in-class exercises.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 051.

Instructor(s): Bredle

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 052.

Instructor(s): F. Delbanco

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce students to essay writing at the college level. Whatever subjects you go on to study, critical composition will constitute a major part of your work here at the University of Michigan. In this class we'll take time to focus on every aspect of the writing process, from choosing a paper topic to revising your final draft.

Since reading and practicing are the two surest ways to improve writing, we'll be doing a lot of both over the course of the semester. Requirements will include four separate revised essays (totaling about 25 pages of polished prose), several ungraded in-class assignments, and readings from a wide range of modern masters (including George Orwell and Joan Didion). Workshopping will play an essential role in this class; by examining and critiquing drafts of each other's work we will learn to be expert editors of each other and of ourselves.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 053, 087, 090.

Instructor(s): Kremer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Lure the reader in!"

The imperative above reflects your task, always, as a writer: engage the reader. Make the reader want to keep reading. In this section of English 125: College Writing, you will concentrate first on "Writing," then on the modifier "College." By the time we get to "College," you will have engaged your creative, analytical, critical, intuitive, humorous, serious and committed writerly personas, and here's the secret you will remain engaged with the whole gang as you fine-tune various approaches to exposition, narrative, argument, textual analysis and the wide and compelling world of writerly rhetoric.

Coursework includes attentive and engaged reading of all assigned texts; discussions and workshops; written peer critiques; frequent short writing assignments and exercises, including process-writing on your own work; four essays and their substantive revision; and presentation of a dramatic monologue.

Required Texts, available @ Shaman Drum Bookstore: A Community of Writers, Peter Elbow & Pat Belanoff, eds., and The Little, Brown Compact Handbook, Jane E. Aaron, ed.

Other required materials: Coursepack, available @ Acc-U-Copy, 518 E. William, dictionary, thesaurus, and a journal, loose-leaf binder or spiral notebook for writing exercises, etc.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 054.

Instructor(s): Davis

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is the difference between exploring and being lost? The question may be a kind of language-trick, but considering nuances in meaning and tone can be critical to understanding how language works. The goal of this class is to allow you to become more comfortable with written language so that the act of writing is one of exploration and not one that makes you feel lost.

In this class we will enter into written dialogue with a variety of essays (and the occasional short story or poem), learning to be careful writers by first becoming careful readers. We will place particular emphasis on construction of an effective thesis, and explore ways of supporting that thesis.

As we consider ways of making language more interesting, economical, and clear, much of our class time will be dedicated to group discussion of your writings. Your writing will include essays of varying length to total roughly 40 pages of work, 20-30 pages of which will be thoroughly revised by the end of the term.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 055, 082 Defining Community. This section is restricted to students from the Michigan Community Scholars Program (formerly known as the 21st Century Program).

Instructor(s): Melanson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is "community"? More specifically, how does this society define the term "community"? Does the term take on different connotations for you based on your class? Gender? Race? Ethnicity? Age? In this course, students will put the direct experiences of their first term at Michigan-both on and off campus-to ponder these and various other questions regarding our society's perspective on "community." Furthermore, this section of English 125 is offered only to students enrolled in the new Michigan Community Scholars Program in Mary Markley Hall and will focus on writing within the context of community service. In addition to attending the course and doing course assignments, students will work for selected community groups as part of their Community Scholars Program community service commitment or as an additional commitment. Students will use writing to reflect upon their community service experience, and there will be reading and writing assignments that will ask students to consider community service learning within the context of contemporary American society and higher education. Students should be aware that specifics of the course may change as the Community Scholars Program evolves. Students should expect to write at least 25-30 pages of polished prose during the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 056.

Instructor(s): J. Smith

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 057.

Instructor(s): Munoz

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 058, 075.

Instructor(s): Breedon

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 060, 061.

Instructor(s): C Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 062, 063.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 066.

Instructor(s): Bruce Fields (bfields@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~bfields/Eng125F99/index.html

Can someone "own" the sequence of words making up an essay, or the particular pattern of zeros and ones representing a digital recording? Is it possible to own an idea, or a fact?

We will examine these questions, and others, through class discussions, readings, and our own writing.

Along the way, we'll encounter programmers whose belief in the free flow of information has lead them to create entire operating systems (such as GNU/Linux) which they can give away for free. We'll study the Internet, both as a medium for the distribution of intellectual property, and as a set of protocols that could themselves be intellectual property. And we'll also make a brief foray into the world of modern cryptography, and learn about the debt it owes to the centuries-old subject of number theory.

The course will have some mathematical content, but the only prerequisites are enthusiasm and a firm grasp of high-school algebra. Some knowledge of computer programming would also be helpful, but is not required.

By the end of the term you can expect to have written 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose.

Note that registration for this section is with an override only. Please contact me at bfields@umich.edu to request an override.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 067.

Instructor(s): Csengeri

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.014.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 068 Writing the Medicalized Body.

Instructor(s): Wu

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will be reading a broad, interdisciplinary range of texts concerning health, illness, and disability by Susan Sontag, Audre Lorde, Arthur Frank, Nancy Mairs, Oliver Sacks, and others. We will address such issues as medicine and ethics; discriminiation and stereotyping; the significance of race, class, and gender in conceptualizing "health"; and the relationship between writing and healing. This course stresses both the communal and the process-oriented aspects of writing. Writing exercises will focus on building the preliminary foundations of a finished essay. Students will have the opportunity to share their work-in-progress with their classmates through workshopping rough drafts. Course requirements include four papers of varying lengths totalling 20-30 pages, short in-class and take-home writing exercises, two class sessions facilitating discussions (one on assigned readings and one on a classmate's workshop draft, and active participation and engaged listening in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 069.

Instructor(s): Dyer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this class is to enable students to develop skills and strategies to become more proficient writers of academic prose. Since both reading and thinking critically are crucial aspects of the academic composing process, we will read and discuss texts on a variety of topics in differing styles. While often only the polished end product of writing is seen, we will reflect on the writing process. Through the writing and rewriting of drafts we will analyze our own personal composing strategies and foibles and also explore writing as a means of thinking. Requirements: Active participation in class, four revised papers between 3-7 pages in length (drafts of students' papers will be discussed in class), weekly written responses to assigned readings and peer reviews.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 070 for West Quad residents only.

Instructor(s): Cicciarelli

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

English 125 is designed to improve your ability to write clear, cohesive essays and to develop your skills as interpreters and communicators of ideas and information. This course will guide your development as critical readers, thinkers, and writers able to communicate in a scholarly, academic community. Using a workshop format (both peer critiques and full class workshops) to examine our writing, we will read each other's work and learn from our strengths and weaknesses. The goal is twofold: to develop the critical skills necessary to read, discuss and analyze a piece of writing, and to learn how to apply these critical skills to our own work. Class discussions will develop critical thought processes that are essential to writing good essays. Part of our work will be to help you find ways to confront our readings and focus your response to them. Students will write 4 essays over the term, each with a draft that will be revised. Written summary-responses to readings and pre-essay preparatory exercises will also be assigned. Our study of writing will focus on clarity and vividness of expression, organization, and development of ideas.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 071 for West Quad residents only.

Instructor(s): Kearns

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The popular television series, The Twilight Zone, the brainchild of Rod Serling, is a springboard for discussion of several themes, including: 1) the nature of evil; 2) time, or how the past affects the present; 3) the individual vs. society; 4) appearances and "truth"; 5) science and the individual; 6) perspectives on fantasy/magic realism. The second way to explore these same themes is through an examination of essays and literature. For example, at the start of the course, we will examine views of the devil (and man's relationship to evil) in short stories, essays and the videos. "The Devil and Daniel Webster" (published in 1937) is an example of early twentieth century literature that harkens back to the nineteenth century's "Young Goodman Brown" that has similar elements. This will also be paired with Stephen King's "The Man in the Black Suit" (The New Yorker, 1980). These similarities and differences will be explored as related to two television episodes: The Howling Man and Printer's Devil. Three papers on these themes are expected as well as participation in workshop (a critique of your own and others' work) and inclass writing prompts. Film techniques (Hitchcock angles, tunnel shots, the gray scale, montage, power positions, compression and framing, tableau and archetypical images) will also form the basis of the link between the written and the visual.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 073.

Instructor(s): Dreiser

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.030.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 074 (Re)Searching/(Re)Interpreting. (for South Quad residents only).

Instructor(s): Berggren

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A speaker at UM (James Slevin) recently said, "Making stuff mean something is at the heart of the writing that gets admired at the university." This writing class will focus on ways we can "make stuff mean something." We will reflect on and interpret events in our lives, groups and experiences on campus, the perspectives of those different from us, and the challenges posed by recent reinterpretations in fields such as history, psychology, law, or medicine. As we research and reinterpret these topics, we'll also discuss questions about audience, rhetorical strategies, evidence, imagination, voice, development, pace, creativity, and other aspects of writing. Required writings include three revised and polished essays, several short reflective papers, exploratory drafts, freewritings, in-class exercises, reading responses, critiques of other students' drafts, and analyses of the writing process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 075.

Instructor(s): Breedon

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.058.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 076.

Instructor(s): Shreve

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The object of this course is to improve our writing and sharpen our critical skills. We will read challenging, provocative essays and narratives that ask as many questions as they answer. Our essays will be original, informed by the constant intersection of our reading, thinking and writing. We will revise and look closely at process how reading generates ideas, how ideas develop and find expression. We will seek to break the pattern of traditional summary learning. In short, we will think for ourselves. Required work: regular reading assignments, peer critiques, 4 revised essays of 4-6 pages in length.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 077 Why Is There Poverty?.

Instructor(s): Helen Fox (hfox@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will encourage you to explore through writing, reading and discussion why anyone in the richest country in the world has to be (wants to be? can't help being?) poor. What does being poor really mean, anyway? How can people lift themselves and others out of poverty? How much should government be involved? What can you do to help eliminate inequalities? Expect lively, in-depth conversation and no "right" answers. This class will have two evening meetings as part of the First-Year Intergroup Relations Seminars (FIGS): Sept. 13 and Nov. 11. The instructor is a former Peace Corps Volunteer.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 078, 084.

Instructor(s): Kopchick

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed as a survey of written composition focusing specifically on formal attributes (sentence and paragraph structure, thematic development, logical discourse). Students focus on developing their own writing through several types of essays (including personal narrative, descriptive, and argumentative essays), group peer evaluation, and class discussion while developing critical reading and editing skills. Each student will write five papers from 3-7 pages in length and will have ten peer critiques. A final portfolio of approximately 30 pages of polished prose will be turned in at the end of the semester. Although the main focus of the course will be on student writing and revision techniques, we will examine the relationship between reading and writing with the text Reading Critically, Writing Well as well as essays from Annie Dillard, E.B. White, and David Foster Wallace.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 079.

Instructor(s): Vederman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 080.

Instructor(s): O'Leary

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 082 Defining Community. This section is restricted to students from the Michigan Community Scholars Program (formerly known as the 21st Century Program).

Instructor(s): Melanson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.055.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 083.

Instructor(s): Kuhn

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.012.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 084.

Instructor(s): Kopchick

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.078.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 085.

Instructor(s): Beal

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 087.

Instructor(s): Kremer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.053.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 088.

Instructor(s): Stamton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 089 It's a Conspiracy! It's a Conspiracy! Or Is It? Conspiracy Theories in American History.

Instructor(s): Judy Daubenmier (jdaubenm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jdaubenm/conspiracy/

Conspiracy Theories in American History will explore an American tendency to explain political and economic events in terms of a secret plot to destroy the American way of life. These explanations have taken many forms. Senator Joseph McCarthy fanned fears of a communist plot in the 1950s. Americans' shock at the murder of President Kennedy produced a bumper crop of conspiracy theories involving the CIA, the Mafia, and others. Belief in conspiracies, however, dates not just to the 1950s but to the earliest days of the Republic. This course will examine several familiar conspiracy theories, as well as some that have faded from the public's memory but were once influential views of the world. Scholars' thinking about the nature of conspiracy theories will frame the course. Films and contemporary writings will provide the raw material for an examination of conditions that allowed conspiracy fears to flourish and their effects on American society. By the end of the term you can expect to have written 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 090.

Instructor(s): Kremer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.053.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 091.

Instructor(s): Beckham

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 092.

Instructor(s): Su

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.016.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 093.

Instructor(s): Talpos

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 095 Body Cultures.

Instructor(s): Stein

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What does it mean to have a "normal" body? How does the idea of a "normal" body change through time and across cultures? How are our bodies defined through hygiene, plastic surgery, fashion, medicine, or ritual? How do people resist these definitions? In this course we will consider both personal experiences and readings in anthropology, history, and feminist theory to understand how the body is shaped by culture. Writing assignments will challenge you to develop your own perspectives through comparative and argumentative essays. Course requirements include writing short reading responses, participating in group discussions and peer reviews, and completing 20-30 pages of revised prose.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 097.

Instructor(s): Skaff

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Contemporary United States culture is brimming with references to the journey, whether across its landscapes, to the moon or within one's own imagination. Students in this course will explore ways in which writers establish point of view through narration or description of travel. We will read or watch a variety of fiction and non-fiction about travel, including novel excerpts, essays, newspaper articles, films and advertisements. Students will analyze means of persuasion and argument in each of these forms of publication, and will learn techniques for establishing connections as readers and writers. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of location in communication, as students develop articulation skills which will allow them to locate themselves and express their interpretations of their surroundings in their writing. Daily writing exercises, reading assignments, peer reviews and 20 30 pages of polished papers of varying lengths will be required.

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Engl. 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 002 Black Multiculturalism. Meets with CAAS 104.001.

Instructor(s): Ifeoma Nwankwo

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 104.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 003 The Poetry of Everyday Life.

Instructor(s): Julie Ellison (jeson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jeson/courses/

What is "the poetry of everyday life"? Poetry written by people who are not professional writers. Poetry written by professional writers about everyday life and work. Poetry that appeared in newspapers, chapbooks, and broadsides; diaries, letters, or college yearbooks; advertising, sermons, and speeches. Poetry that people memorized. Poetry that responds to local history and the experience of local residents. Poetry that people published privately. Poetry in hand-made books. Poetry slams, song lyrics, graffitti, nursery rhymes. Common speech transmuted into an art form, as in the interviews turned into performances by Anna Deavere Smith. This course will range over a wide variety of verse dating from 1800 to 1999. Research, creating web projects, keeping a personal "commonplace book," and working on "Poetry in the Park" with a fourth grade class are likely to be part of the course, which will meet in several locations throughout the term. Different kinds of writing assignments, papers, and presentations will be required. Class attendance and commitment to team projects is absolutely crucial. Members of the seminar need to work as a high-energy, mobile, flexible group.

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Engl. 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 001 The Memoir as Art and Remembrance.

Instructor(s): Peter Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The art of the author's personal memory, whether taking the form of autobiography, fiction, drama, or film, has found great favor in recent years. Examples from several genres will help us study the importance of memory and the artistic forms it can take. We will try to determine what these varied works have to say about the individuals recalling their life and times. Possible authors and filmmakers: Russell Baker, Philip Roth, Eva Hoffman, Frank McCourt, Geoffrey Wolff, Tobias Wolff, Margaret Atwood, Woody Allen, Federico Fellini. About seven books and two films; I will post the list outside my office (3180 Angell Hall) before the beginning of the Fall Term. Class size should allow each student a chance to lead discussion. One short paper; one longer critical/analytical essay. Course requires your actively and intelligently participating presence as we try to learn together (which is the nature of a seminar) about the nature and importance of remembrance.

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Engl. 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 002 Writing Women's Lives: Twentieth Century Narratives.

Instructor(s): Kelly Ritter (kritter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

This sophomore-level course will focus on the way in which women write about their own lives and the lives of other women in novels, short fiction, poetry, and film. We will examine a variety of texts from the twentieth century, both in the U.S. and the U.K. Working roughly chronologically, we will ask, what constitutes a "woman's" narrative? How do these women writers "fit" into the existing literature canon, and to what end? Do women writers utilize language differently than their male counterparts, and if so, with what results?

Tentative texts for the course include the novels Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping; Kate Chopin's The Awakening; Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway; and Angela Carter's Nights at the Circus; Susan Minot's short story collection Lust; poetry by Anne Sexton (either Live or Die or Transformations); autobiographical writings by contemporary women writers in the anthology Writing Women's Lives; and Jane Campion's film The Piano. We will also look at some recent poetry criticism, including portions of Writing Like a Woman. Work for the course will include several reading responses (likely postings to a listserv), three papers of 3, 5, and 6-8 pages, an in-class presentation, and a final exam. As this is a seminar, regular attendance and regular participation is expected from all students.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

All sections of 223 teach the writing of two of the following three genres: fiction (including personal narrative), drama, and poetry. Different sections will emphasize the individual genres to varying degrees. Class work involves the discussion of the process of writing and the work of a few published authors. Students will do exercises meant to develop a sensitivity to language and a facility with evocative detail, voice, form, and so forth. Most classroom time, however, is devoted to reading and discussion of student writing. A final portfolio of revised finished work of 35-50 manuscript pages may be required. Section descriptions for courses not listed below can be found on the department's Web page (http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/courses/f99/f99courses/223cds.htm).

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 002, 004.

Instructor(s): K. Allen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Stanley

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do we employ language to articulate what we feel and know? This course will focus on nurturing the beginning writer's voice. Careful attention will be paid to developing clarity of expression in poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction, as well as exploring musicality and meter: the various pleasures of language. We will sample widely from a variety of poems, essays and stories to excite and stimulate the creative process. Mark Doty, Anne Carson, Rumi, Marie Howe, Michael Cunningham, Patricia Powell, Amy Bloom, and Bernard Cooper are some of the poets and authors we will be reading. Class time will consist of close, compassionate critical reading of student work, writing exercises and informed discussion of published texts and issues of craft. In addition to reading assignments, students are responsible for midterm and final portfolios (6-8 revised poems in the first portfolio and 20-25 pages of prose in the second), weekly writing assignments, a student-teacher conference, and consistent class attendance. There will be no final exam. Required texts to be announced.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 007.

Instructor(s): Barron

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this introductory creative writing course, you will be encouraged to explore the ideas that move you the most and to discover the additional rewards of revision-shaping each piece in the hope of moving your readers. We will employ occasional in-class exercises to help turn your observations and experiences into lines, stanzas, images, characters, settings, scenes, and drafts. Most of our time will be spent in workshop, giving and receiving thoughtful criticism on student work; however, we will reserve the beginning of each class to discuss the basic techniques of fiction and poetry in the context of assigned readings by authors such as Dybek, Endrezze, Goldbarth, Hurston, Malamud, Paley, Pritchett, Walcott, and Welty. By the end of the term you will have completed and revised 5-10 pages of poetry and 25-30 pages of fiction. Other requirements: class attendance, active participation, and attendance at two public readings.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Liefer

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this introductory creative writing course you will apply the techniques of fiction and poetry (with an emphasis on poetry) to the task of mining your observations, experiences and imagination for creative material. Your aim: to uncover your emerging voice as a writer. Besides workshopping one another's poems and stories, we will be reading from a slew of contemporary authors to get a sense of the literary climate your work will be part of. We will also spend time discussing the various elements of craft and experimenting with writing exercises. Requirements include: Writing and revising fiction (15-30 pp.) and poetry (5-8 poems), class attendance and participation, keeping a writing journal, and attending a public reading in each genre.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): N. Johnson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide a dynamic environment to fuel your imagination. As the poet Stanley Kunitz once said: "I'm a physical being and resent this sedentary business of sitting at one's desk and moving one's wrist. I pace, I speak my poems, I get very kinetic when I'm working." In our explorations into the vigor of the English language we will mine the dramatic monologue, musical trends, and the visual arts for inspiration. The vitality of your personal process will be at the core of this workshop, the life of your words both on and off the page our central concern. Course requirements: a portfolio of revised work including 6-8 poems, one short story, a short dramatic monologue, a multi-media project and a response paper on a public reading, performance or exhibition.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Nguyen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class will introduce you to the craft of writing fiction and poetry. Both genres will be studied, with slightly more emphasis on fiction. What may seem reckless at first will be crafted, through revision and thoughtful criticism, into portfolios of revised work. While the focus of the class will be on your writing, we will also be reading and discussing a range of works by contemporary authors; good writers, after all, are good readers. Class discussions will involve ideas concerning style, language, and why it is we write.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Ralph

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Katherine Anne Porter was rumored to write without once revising a word. For the rest of us, unfortunately, good writing isn't so easily achieved. While this course may not transform you into the next incarnation of Porter or Raymond Carver, Junot Diaz, Rita Dove, Bernard Malamud, Martin Espada or any of the authors and poets we'll read with a combination of hard work, thoughtfulness, and a commitment to honest, heart-felt writing, all of you will hopefully become improved writers. Class will be conducted in workshop format with readings and discussions of each other's work. The requirements two revised stories equaling 25-30 pages, 5-10 pages of poetry, active participation and attendance, and thorough engagement with the assigned readings are designed to facilitate and encourage you in your writing pursuits.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this introductory creative writing course is to bring your unique experiences, observations, and passions to bear on the craft of writing. In doing so, we will put both your creative and critical minds to use through the writing and critiquing of poetry and fiction. Although the focus will be on workshopping each other's work, we will also read and discuss work by authors such as Ernest Hemingway, Flannery O'Connor, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Junot Duaz, Elizabeth Bishop, Rita Dove, Yusef Komunyakaa, and Philip Levine. The course will start off with short writing exercises and then follow up with fiction and poetry components. Requirements include a final portfolio of revised work (including 6-8 poems and 20-25 pages of fiction) and attendance at several public readings. Class attendance and participation are essential.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 016.

Instructor(s): Adler

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class we will write to gain understanding and mine what moves us. You can come with ideas for stories and poems or none at all. We will learn to develop characters and allow them to tell us the story, develop voices and personae that speak the poem. All you need to take this class is the desire to write. The class will focus on student writing and function as a workshop discussion-group with students paying close, critical attention to each other's work. In addition to learning from each other we will discuss stories, passages, monologues and poetry by authors including Raymond Carver, Toni Morrison, Michael Ondaatje, Chekhov, Neruda, Anna Deveare Smith, Rilke, Amy Hempel, Ethan Canin and Alice Munro. If there is a particular writer you want to discuss in class you are welcome to share the work that inspires you. Students are responsible for reading assignments, midterm and final portfolios (fifteen-page minimum for each, the final including revisions), weekly writing exercises, attendance at a fiction and poetry reading, and consistent class attendance.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 018.

Instructor(s): Lutman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"How can I know what I think until I see what I say?"
E.M. Forster

In this workshop you will be encouraged to write poetry and fiction as a means of discovery. My goal is to help you help each other in the processes of creation, exploration, and revision, and so the majority of in-class time will be devoted to sharing ideas and offering responses to one another's work. Other class activities will include writing exercises and discussion of assigned readings of authors such as Carson McCullers, James Baldwin, ee cummings, Rita Dove, and Adrienne Rich. Always our emphasis will be on your writing, and by term's end you will have submitted 5-10 poems and 2-3 stories for a combined minimum of 30 pages. You will be required to submit midterm and final portfolios of your poetry and prose and attend an exit conference with me. Grades will reflect your commitment to achieving course and personal goals for your writing, and you will provide evidence of this commitment through the timely submission of work, care and effort in revision, active class participation, and completion of readings.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 019.

Instructor(s): Shreve

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The object of this introductory workshop in creative writing is to write what moves you, whether it be autobiographical or fully imagined, traditional or experimental, strident or quiet, domestic or grand. While there will be assigned readings and specific writing exercises, and while we will discuss various techniques, strategies, and styles in a more or less structured atmosphere, the course will not insist on any one way of writing. Our readings and creative work should be as broad and diverse as the lives we bring to them. In workshopping each other's poems and stories we will offer thoughtful, considered criticism, reading each piece on its own terms. Required work: regular reading, peer critiques, 4 revised poems, 2-4 revised stories.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 020, 025.

Instructor(s): Aitken

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This introductory course will focus on play writing and fiction, with an emphasis on fiction. We will consider techniques such as tone, pacing, and characterization in our readings of fiction and plays. We will also talk about how published writers such as Alice Munro, Alice Walker, and William Trevor use dramatic need and economy in their writing. Students will learn process techniques for writing short stories, short shorts, and plays. Course requirements include a minimum of 35 pages of revised fiction, and a 5-10 page scene. Strong participation and attendance to one public reading are also required.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 021.

Instructor(s): Kirk

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

By way of inspiration we will read and discuss poetry, fiction of varying length, and some creative non-fiction by writers of vastly differing backgrounds different ages, parts of the world, and languages, though all we read will be rendered into English. Writers you wish to share and discuss with the class will find a place in our generative syllabus. Even so, the course focuses primarily on our own attempts at writing and what these efforts engender: 7-10 revised poems, 20-25 pages of revised fiction, one creative essay. A 'finished' product implies polish and completion, a suspicious lack of open ends which we will look upon with no small distrust. Let nothing be settled, nor settled for. Class will consist mostly of workshops, discussion and suggestion with regard to each other's work, always in progress. Additionally, everyone will attend two readings and write short responses. Bring your enthusiasm for the English language and its insatiable possibilities.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 022.

Instructor(s): Breedon

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 023.

Instructor(s): Hutton

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This introductory creative writing course will require a fearless imagination, complete sincerity, strong opinions, and dogged enthusiasm. We will inspire each other to write surprising and thoughtful pieces, and produce, by the end of the semester, an impressive, intelligent and polished thirty page portfolio of revised poems and fiction. The course work will also include weekly reading assignments, responses to these readings, small group workshops, and occasional in-class writing assignments.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 024.

Instructor(s): Kelly Ritter (kritter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

In this section of 223, we will focus just about equally on writing poetry and writing fiction. We will begin the course with a study of poetry, via reading both published models and student work in class workshops. After midterm, we will turn our attention to fiction, with the same balance between published work and student work.

Grades in this section will be largely determined by revision. All students must revise their poetry and fiction in midterm and final portfolios for a grade. I cannot emphasize enough the importance of revision regardless of degree in a writer's development. Despite rumors, folklore, and wishful thinking, the writers who consistently improve and succeed personally and professionally are the writers who understand the fluctuating nature of their own creative work. A poem or story may seem "finished" after it is written, but that status may change a day, a week, or even a year later, whether due to reader comments or changes within the writer him or herself. Please be aware of this focus on revision as we proceed with the course.

Prerequisites Completion of the composition requirement (English 124, 125, or equivalent). Students currently enrolled in one of these courses may take 223 concurrently, but should be aware that I will expect in all work (creative and expository) a command of grammar and style at the sophomore (post-composition) level.

Course Texts (available at Shaman Drum Books)

Course Requirements (% distribution)

Portfolios During the course of the semester, you will complete a series of poetry and fiction writing exercises in addition to your own original (non-assignment based) poems and short stories. This work will be revised and collected in two portfolios: at midterm for the poetry, and at finals for the fiction. Portfolio grades will be based on amount and degree of revision, attention to structure and presentation of the portfolio itself, and overall development of the work over each genre and each seven week section. These portfolios represent the bulk of the course work.

Formal Paper Each student will write a four to five page paper on a volume of poetry or a collection of short stories written in the last ten years (1990-present). This paper should pay attention to the structure of the collection, the prevailing themes, the use of language, and the relative success of the work (in the eyes of you, the student writer/reviewer). This paper should be in MLA style, with proper margins (one inch), typed in 12-point font and double spaced. Students who are unfamiliar with MLA style for paper format should see me for guidelines.

Readings Each student is required to attend two public readings, either on campus or in Ann Arbor, and write a two page review of each reading. One reading should be primarily poetry, the other fiction. I will provide the class with a list of scheduled readings as advertised for the fall term; students may review other unadvertised readings so long as I approve the reading in advance. I will hand out more specific guidelines for these reviews in the first few weeks of the term.

Attendance and Participation Regular attendance and participation are mandatory. Excessive absences and/or tardiness not due to illness will result in lowering of final grades and possible failure of the course. I do take attendance; therefore, students who realize in advance that they will be absent for a specific, unavoidable reason (a religious holiday, family emergency, or the like) should notify me in advance. Other sorts of absences (due to a part-time job, work in another class, etc.) are ill-advised, but ultimately your own responsibility.

Students who participate actively, regularly, and thoughtfully (both in terms of preparedness and consideration of classmates' work) will receive full credit ("A") for the participation portion of the course grade. Students who attend regularly, but who speak irregularly or little to not at all will receive partial credit ("C"). Students who either consistently disrupt the course or who show little respect for the class (always arriving late, not preparing for class, ridiculing or showing contempt for classmates' work) will receive no credit ("F") for participation. Students who fall somewhere in between these distinct categories will receive +/- grades along the A-F scale for participation.
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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 025.

Instructor(s): Aitken

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 223.020.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 026.

Instructor(s): Munoz

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide students with a basic foundation in the craft of creative writing. The course will be taught in two units poetry during the first six weeks and fiction during the last seven. During each unit, we will study the work of published masters to gather insights into technique. Written exercises both in-class and take-home will complement classroom discussions of reading assignments. The emphasis, however, will be on workshopping poems and stories written by students.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 027.

Instructor(s): Kearns

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This semester, we will explore poetry, fiction, and publication. Writing prompts will aid in the production of poetry and prose. We will study several writers' techniques to aid in this writing. Visits from published authors will help in formulating a basis for criticism. We'll ask how publication informs personal criticism and creativity. Students will be expected to attend outside readings and write one-page reviews for credit. There will be one critical paper (4-6 pages) developing a personal aesthetic using a specific poet's work and/or fiction writers' work. But the main focus of the work will be on the student's own writing compiled in a mid-point portfolio and a final portfolio. There will be numerous writing prompts throughout the semester and opportunities to write in class as well as writing workshop, a critique of your own and others' writing.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course furthers the aims of English 124 and 125 in helping to analyze the various claims of a given issue and to develop ways of exploring and defending positions, ideas, and beliefs in writing. Careful attention will be paid to the process of reasoning, the testing of assumptions and claims, the questioning of beliefs, and the discovery of ideas and evidence through analysis and rigorous articulation in written discourse. The course will also focus on considerations of style, formal strategy techniques, and revision as integral to precision in making points and developing argumentative ideas both for purposes of individual reflection as well as for the purpose of persuading an audience. Section descriptions for courses not listed below can be found on the department's Web page ().

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kingley

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 002, 017 Argumentative Writing: Or, How to Persuade Your Mother to Get a Tattoo.

Instructor(s): Widmayer

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

First, think about your mother. Does she like hummingbirds or true-love knots? Would she like a full-body tattoo or an ankle tattoo? Next, consider how to present this proposition to her. Should you spring it on her at once? Or direct the conversation another way at first to quell her suspicions? And finally, consider how you should structure your arguments. What sort of evidence will you use? How will she respond to your arguments and evidence? In this section we will first learn the rules for classical argumentation. Always bearing in mind the audiences to whom writers address their arguments, we then will learn how to parse and evaluate the arguments of such writers and orators as: Abraham Lincoln, Sojourner Truth, Thomas Jefferson, Martin Luther King Jr., George Orwell, James Baldwin, Barbara Tuchman, Stephen Jay Gould, Alice Walker, Charles Darwin, and Linda Hasslestrom. Course requirements will include participating vigorously in class or small-group discussions, composing reading responses, writing five essays two of which will require outside sources, formulating critiques of your classmates' and your own writing, and presenting arguments in formal class debates.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 005 Wagging the Dog?.

Instructor(s): Silva

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Argumentative writing skills are crucial regardless of disciplinary field. Writing opinion pieces is fine; being able to construct properly substantiated, coherent, and well-structured arguments is a sign of a more accomplished writer. We will be developing these writing skills throughout this course.

We will do so by engaging with and asking questions about popular culture and its social functions. It is there for entertainment, yes, but does it also serve as a source of historical information? Does it invent our everyday reality in ways we are not aware of? Do we create it or does it create us, personally and socially? We will address these questions by examining critical essays and contrasting primary texts (perhaps reading a 19th century dime novel and then watching Armageddon). This course necessitates a commitment to writing (expect four papers of varying length totaling 20-30 pages of polished writing) and an open mind.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 006, 007.

Instructor(s): Young

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

his course examines what counts as an effective argument for writers from various disciplines. Our reading assignments which will also serve as springboards for student writing will cover such topics as race relations, gendered images, advertising, popular culture, and theories of language. We will look closely at the elements of effective arguments, including standards of evidence, the provision of warrants, and the rigorous use of language. Requirements include four 5-7 page papers, with revisions and workshopping, frequent shorter assignments (of a page or so), and regular class participation.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 008, 015.

Instructor(s): Laskowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is based on the following assumptions: 1. A good argumentative essay focuses on an issue about which reasonable adults might differ. In other words, a good argument begins with an authentic question, not a pre-established opinion. 2. A good argumentative essay offers convincing discussion of at least two differing points of view. The model is that of a debate, not an editorial. 2. A good argumentative essay has substantive argument, not just hear-say, anecdotal discussion. This means library research.

Readings: from "The Ethicist," The New York Times; Lefkowitz, Our Guys; Nussbaum, Cultivating Humanity; Schlink, The Reader.

Films: Still Killing Us Softly, Cry Rape Dead Poets Society.

Requirements: 1. Class attendance, homework preparation, & participation in class discussion. Students who are unprepared will not be given full credit for attending class. The class is not television. After the third absence, the final grade is lowered one-half a grade level for each additional absence. 2. Four 5-7 page argumentative essays citing researched evidence of at least two differing points of view. Shorter essays or insufficient research will receive appropriately lower grades. 3. -Eighteen 1-2 page critiques of other students' essays.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 009, 023 Race, Class and Gender in 20th-Century America.

Instructor(s): Martha Patterson (pattersn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course develops strategies of crafting and analyzing argumentative writing as we explore a diverse selection of readings about multiculturalism in America. It examines experiences of difference (in family, language, neighborhood), theories of American society (assimilation, melting pot, multiculturalism, ethnic separatism), the roots of discrimination (national, religious, cultural, economic, pseudo-scientific, psychological), and means of addressing discrimination (integration, political activism, economic advancement, affirmative action).

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Tessier

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Since this class was designed to augment your palette of writing skills, I have tried to provide a text, A World of Ideas, that offers a variety of thematic possibilities. Its eight sections Government, Justice, Wealth, Mind, Nature, Culture, Faith, and Poetics represent a wide range of thought. Looking at a tradition of critical thinking that stretches from the Chou dynasty (sixth century B.C.) to the late twentieth century, we will carefully examine the structure of various truth claims and studiously consider their method of persuasion. The practical purpose of this class is to further develop your writing skills in a way that ensures your continuing academic success!

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 012, 013.

Instructor(s): Kaitany

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Roberts

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 015.

Instructor(s): Laskowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 225.008.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 016.

Instructor(s): Ray

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 017 Argumentative Writing: Or, How to Persuade Your Mother to Get a Tattoo.

Instructor(s): Widmayer

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 225.002.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 023.

Instructor(s): M. Patterson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 225.009.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 025, 029.

Instructor(s): Morgan

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Learning to construct defensible, compelling arguments is the goal of this course. Towards this end, we will study the elements of persuasive writing, especially the process of reasoning, the testing of assumptions and claims, the questioning of beliefs, and the use of evidence. We will also examine, as models of rhetoric and style, the appeals to reason and emotion made in a variety of texts: classic literature, political speeches, and

modern-day advertisements. Students will be asked to write three essays of medium length (5-7 pages), in addition to several shorter papers, and to participate in class discussions and in-class activities, including peer reviewing.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 027.

Instructor(s): Cook

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Popularly, argument involves demonstrating a valid point through reasoned presentation of sufficient evidence. While true enough, this definition constructs argument as confrontation and contest, overlooking the possibility of logical, ethical, and cooperative process. Rather than reserving argument for combatants like lawyers and philosophers, we need to recognize it as an integral part of our thinking process that informs all writing tasks. When we move from voicing simple, untested opinion to openly and honestly evaluating the bases for those opinions, we are engaging in argument. In this course, you will develop such an approach examining your own positions on a social issue of import to you and then testing your claims in a deeper exploration in concert with other students as you negotiate an argumentative presentation. Building on the basic skills of your first-year composition class, you will write a series of arguments that observe, explain, evaluate, convince, negotiate, and persuade, and a final reflective portfolio. Course assignments include five written arguments and revisions ranging from a two-page exploratory essay to a 8-10 page persuasive essay, one one-page summary, an annotated bibliography of five articles, peer response letters, a collaborative class presentation, participation in weekly e-mail conversations, and a demonstration portfolio with self-reflexive evaluation.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 028.

Instructor(s): Stanton

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 029.

Instructor(s): Morgan

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 225.025.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 032.

Instructor(s): Story

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 033.

Instructor(s): Fluhr

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 034.

Instructor(s): Kopchick

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This advanced writing course focuses on the elements of evidence and argument. Students will be encouraged to analyze the various components of a given issue and the writing conventions of different disciplines in order to explore and defend their positions, ideas, and beliefs in writing. In the process, they will concentrate on the testing of assumptions and claims, the questioning of beliefs, and the analysis and rigorous articulation of evidence in written discourse. In short, the aim of the course is to teach students to think logically and then to express thoughts in clear, readable prose. Each student will write three papers over the course of the semester (two of which will be completely rewritten), keep a reading journal, and participate in group workshops. The course also assumes that better readers make better writers, so students should be prepared to read 35-50 pages of prose per week.

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Engl. 226. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 227/Theatre 227. Introductory Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Wendy Hammond (wham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 227.001.

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Engl. 229/LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott Kassner (skassner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the introductory composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~skassner/Eng229.html

In this course, students analyze and practice the types of writing done by technical and professional writers. Like all effective writing, technical and professional writing emerges from an understanding of purpose and audience, from an understanding of "the rhetorical context." It is the specifics of its rhetorical context not any implied intellectual difference that distinguishes technical and professional writing from other forms of writing. Thus, a major goal of this course will be to help students develop the analytical skills they will need to navigate the rhetorical contexts technical and professional writers encounter in a variety of fields.

Since most technical and professional writing is the result of collaborative activity, students should expect to work in teams in the course, but the course will also address more personal issues, such as the writing of resumes and letters of self-promotion.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maureen Aitken (aitkenm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This section of "What is Literature?" will examine the interplay of love and authority. We will consider the dramatic needs of characters from a diverse set of readings, and analyze how their definitions of love tangle with authority figures. We will consider how these authority figures wield power through religion, war, patriarchy, and government. How are social class, ethnicity, and gender changing the nature of this struggle? Readings will include: Othello; 100 Years of Solitude; The Joy Luck Club; and The Good Soldier. Assignments will include regular response papers, a midterm, and a final paper. Participation is essential.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 002.

Instructor(s): William Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What does it mean to be an author, to create a story? To figure that out, we'll be authors ourselves a little and ask about our own responses as readers. We'll read texts closely, attempting to understand their less accessible meanings, the effect of the social and economic context in which they are written and read, and what's at stake for us, if anything, in the content. We'll be interested in the social purposes of literature and in questions of authors' responsibilities. We'll read or view The Official Story, Interviews with My Lai Veterans; Wiesenthal's The Sunflower; Coetzee's Age of Iron; Thomas' The White Hotel; Kingsolver's Pigs In Heaven; Washington's Iron House; Cervantes' Emplumada; and Shange's "spell #7." Class participation will be important, and you'll write 25 pages worth of essays and literature, the nature of which we'll determine together. No exams.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Lillian Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will want to think about the power and the connectedness that the act of telling stories might provide. For example a character in Ursula Hegi's Stones from the River thinks, "Every time I take a story and let it stream through my mind from beginning to end, it grows fuller, richer, feeding on my visions of those people the story belonged to until it leaves its bed like the river I love. And then I have to tell the story to someone." As the term continues and we discuss various 20th-century literature works (mostly), we will find ourselves grappling with issues as basic as what defines the dimensions of a character and the place that character makes in his or her world. We want to understand how an author has prepared these amazing creations to speak to us. Although the complete syllabus decisions are yet to be made, I'm sure we will want to select from the following authors: J. Irving, M. Atwood, G. Naylor, I. Allende.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 004.

Instructor(s): John González (jmgonzal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will consider the relationship between literary works and the social conditions of their production, centering upon questions of freedom, identity, and representation. Short narratives of the U.S. nineteenth century will provide the grounds for our examinations; authors will include Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Frederick Douglass, Katherine Chopin, Henry James, Rebecca Harding Davis, Stephen Crane, and Sarah Orne Jewett. Emphasis will be placed upon the techniques, terminologies, and practices of interpretation, both in classroom discussion and in analytical essays; course work will include two major papers and weekly response papers.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Alan Howes (ahowes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In asking the question "What is Literature?" we will be more interested in exploring boundaries and characteristics of different types of writing than in arriving at a specific answer. In that process of exploration we will look back upon our experiences as readers and writers, as well as examine closely a variety of texts. Texts will include fiction, drama, film, poetry, and critical essays, drawn from a wide range of cultures and historical periods. Among other works we will read Dorris, A Yellow Raft in Blue Water; Morrison, Beloved; Silko, Ceremony; Woolf, Orlando or To The Lighthouse; Shakespeare, King Lear and Twain, Huckleberry Finn. There will be frequent writing of short pieces and a final examination.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 007 World Literature in English.

Instructor(s): Lem Johnson (eljay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

English is spoken and written and re-invented in India and Ireland, Trinidad, the USA, and in England, of course. In addition, the language has also "travelled" with certain "master texts". Shakespeare and Coca Cola; The Authorized Version of the Bible; "Masterpiece Theater;" and CNN World News. There's also been the idioms and images of that come from how Australia or Canada has worked on "English". and the same is true of what West Africans have done to the package. There is also the question of what such musical forms as "Calypso" and "Country and Western" have contributed to the rhythms of English speech as in, say, Derek Walcott's O, Babylon and Dorothy Allison's Bastard out of Carolina. We'll look at selections of poems, plays, and fiction from such places; and our authors will include names like Toni Morrison and Herman Melville, as well as Wole Soyinka, Mulk Raj Anand, and Shakespeare. And we'll deal in titles that range from Death of a Salesman to Our Sister Killjoy, and from The God of Small Things to Joebell and America

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Andrea Kaitany (akaitany@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Literature" is an amorphous term; its definition changes with time, through cultures, and among social groups. In this course we will explore the defintions of literature that are manifested across works from a wide range of time periods and cultures. Readings will range from Shakespeare's King Lear to Toni Morrison's Sula and Tsitsi Dangarembga's Nervous Conditions, as well as including other selections from the genres of drama, fiction, poetry, and the non-fiction essay. We will focus broadly on the themes of family and origins and examine some of the ways in which these themes develop across the genres of the works and across the various social matrices within which the works were created. Grading will be based on class discussion, brief content-based quizzes, and several essays.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Scott Melanson (melanson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The study of literature today tends to focus on the multiplicity of "voices" within literary texts. Regardless of its genre or geographical/historical context, we can look for and discuss the ways in which a text's characters (both central and minor), narrator(s), speakers, etc., are represented or ignored by the author, as well as how they interact linguistically with one another. More often than not, contemporary literary critics use this focus on these textual representations and dynamics to raise important questions about the social and political ramifications of literature. In this course, students will ask these kinds of questions about a wide variety of literatures, then test out answers to these questions through extensive in-class discussion, and three short papers (3-4 pages), and one longer paper (7-10 pages).

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Scottie Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For this course, we will be drawing on texts and films that deal with North America during the period between early British colonization and the Civil War. In order to get at the question "what is literatures" (or "what is film?"., we will, in each segment of the course, commence with a non-".iterary" document and then move through fictional renditions of this document and the events it describes. In one section, for example, we will begin with accounts of the witch trials of 1692 (court documents and ministerial sermons); we will then read Hawthorne's tale, "Young Goodman Brown," and his novel, The Scarlet Letter; finally, we will read Arthur Miller's The Crucible (I am still debating whether we should watch Demi Moore as Hester to inquire not into "what is evil?" but instead: "what is bad".. In this and other sections, we will also read commentary from the periods about "what is literature" and current criticism about the formation of canonical literature. In traversing history and genres and criticism we will think about the following: How does each period define literature? What is the difference between reporting and narrating? How does a given genre change one's understanding and experience of an original event? How do we decide what is "great" or "American"? You will write short responses to the texts/films, one short and one long paper, one brief creative piece (to experience literature from another side), and we'll do a bit of dramatization in class. Texts inlcude Strachey's A True Reportory; Shakespeare's The Tempest; Greenaway's Prospero's Books; Lawson's A Brief and True Narrative; Mather's Wonders of the Invisible World; Miller's The Crucible; The Old Testament from Exodus and from Jeremiah; Rowlandson's The Soveraignty and Goodness of God; Delano's Narrative of Voyages and Travels; Melville's Benito Cereno; and Spielberg's Amistad.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Martha Patterson (pattersn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide both an introduction to a wide range of literature and a chance to develop interpretive skills. While we will spend much of our time learning strategies of close reading exploring the significance of narrative style, genre, characterization, point of view, prosody, voice tone, audience, etc. we will also learn to identify major trends in literary theory. At the same time, we will look at the ways in which these literary works both influence and are influenced by the culture of which they are a part.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 013.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

During the 19th century, in what literary scholars call the renaissance of American literature, it probably seemed a simpler task than it does now to provide an all-encompassing description of the American literary tradition. Hawthorne and Melville wrote about confrontations between individual desire and harsh social constraints; James and Wharton explored American dreams becoming American nightmares; Twain and Chopin spoke for outsiders to mainstream values and customs. But as new literary voices from diverse ethnic cultures began to emerge at end of the century, describing that American tradition became a trickier endeavor. Writers such as Yezierski, Farrell, Alvarez, Chu, Erdrich, Morrison, and others, continue to lament about the clash between the individual and the culture, see American dreams becoming American nightmares, and write from the position of the outsider, but at the same time they change the terms of discourse in American literature. We will make the construction of an expanded description of service literature our mission in this course, celebrating not only what connects these writers separated by time and experience, but what makes each unique. Requirement: one 2-3pp essay, two 4-6; contributions to a computer conference, a final, regular attendance, and active class participation.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Alisse Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL239.html

What is literature? That question invites discussion, both serious and playful, more than it points to a "right answer." In our exploration of literature, we will read, discuss, and write about six novels. Though the novels are varied in style and content, each has something important to say about the power of language of speaking, of writing, of telling stories. The first two books pair a classic novel (Jane Eyre) with a recent revision (Wide Sargasso Sea). The next two books consider, among other things, some differences between oral and literate cultures (Song of Solomon and Things Fall Apart). The fifth and sixth books experiment with traditional novel-writing in compelling, even fun ways that highlight storytelling (Like Water for Chocolate and If on a winter's night a traveler). Students will participate in class discussions and write several brief responses to the readings as well as two 3-5 page papers.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 015.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course addresses how our expectations of literature are shaped by our assumptions about gender, ethnicity, and class. Who is literature for? What purpose does it serve? What makes a "good" poem or story, and how do we know this? Can a poem be political, and if so, how? How do specific literary periods and even technological developments (such as the invention of the computer) change our ideas of literature? How might each of us read a literary work differently, and why? This course also explores questions of literary genre, such as the thin line between autobiography and fiction, between prose-poems and poems that have line and stanza breaks, and between a short story and novel (i.e., is the difference just one of length? Can a series of related short stories be a novel)? While we will be using an anthology for this course, other works will be chosen from a list that includes Frederick Douglass's autobiography, Kate Chopin's The Awakening, William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, and Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon, as well as Voltaire's Candide (to read across time) and Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart (to read across space). We will also read excerpts from Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own, which speculates about how a writer's background and audience may influence her art. This course will include a number of different approaches to writing about literature, to help us to become more comfortable with various terms and methods. Students will write a number of informal responses as well as three formal papers, as well as a midterm and a final. Class participation and discussion are essential components of this course.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the art of poetry so that you can read and discuss any poem with understanding and delight. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poetic techniques and forms to a more detailed study of the work of a selection of authors from the Renaissance to the present. For the former, we will use Western Wind by John Frederick Nims. For the latter, we will use The Norton Anthology of Poetry. Formal writing will include four (ungraded) exercises in poetic analysis and four (graded) papers (3-5 pages) on individual authors and poems.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Lorna Goodison

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to poetry: its traditional forms, themes, techniques, and uses of language; its historical and geographical range; and its twentieth century diversity. The course will include discussion of oral and written traditions, and the place of performance in contemporary poetry; the kinds of power (from the magical to the political) which have often been associated with poetry; the relationships between secular and sacred traditions in poetry; and the varying roles of audiences and readers in the traditions of poetry. There will be discussion of the function of historical and national categories, as well as those of race and gender and class.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 004 Honors.

Instructor(s): Adela Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this Honors section of English 240, we will focus on the meaning of poetic form. Reading a wide variety of poems, from different periods and places, we will explore the following questions: how do poems ask us to read them? what do poems do to ordinary language? how do the forms in which poems are written become meaningful? We will begin our reading in and around The Norton Anthology of Poetry, moving through a series of units designed to raise and explore some of the questions above; we will then read several short volumes of twentieth-century poetry together, including perhaps Elizabeth Bishop's Geography III and Rita Dove's Thomas and Beulah. Students will be expected to read carefully, participate enthusiastically in class discussion, and write four papers.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A course in ways to understand, feel, enjoy, evaluate, and interpret poems. Poetry differs from ordinary language and from prose in certain fairly conventional and (for poetry) advantageous ways, and we shall try to understand how it does so. As we look at and hear poems, we shall consider such things as sound, diction, rhythm, figures of speech, the line, form, genre, authorship, audience, and context. Our readings will come from various cultures, old and now; most readings will be British and American, most of these recent or contemporary. We'll pay some attention to the histories of poetry, and try to get a feel for the contemporary poetry scene. Texts: an Introduction to Poetry book and an anthology, both in course pack form. Everyone will write three essays on increasingly challenging topics. There will be a test on "technical terms," another on the course readings, and a final exam asking for the interpretation and evaluation of some new poetry.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 006, 007.

Instructor(s): Mary Zweip (mnz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course begins to answer the question of how to read poetry with pleasure and skill. We will look carefully at poem after poem, with an emphasis on the poet's craft, or how the poem is put together. Requirements will include some memorizing, several short "exercises," two formal papers of analysis, midterm, and final. Regular attendance is expected. Class proceeds by discussion. Text is the complete Norton Anthology of Poetry.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Emily Cloyd (ecloyd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Poetry is a game and a source of pleasure, and to understand a poem fully, just as to understand any complex game, we need to acquire knowledge and skill: fluency. We will read aloud, memorize, analyze, discuss. There will be frequent short writings, and a few longer papers, a computer conference, and, probably, a midterm and a final. Regular attendance and active participation in class meetings are required.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Beaston

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We shall read a wide-ranging selection of poems from The Norton Anthology of Poetry (shorter fourth ed.) in order to develop strategies for understanding and appreciating poetry. John Hollander's Rhyme's Reason (enlarged ed.) will aid us in our enterprise. Since, for purposes of this course, we shall regard the appreciation of poetry as a partly communal activity, rather than a strictly individual one, you will be expected to attend each class period prepared to share your individual reading experiences with other members of the class. Course requirements include four short papers (2-3 pages), several in-class writings, some memorization, and midterm and final examinations.

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Engl. 245/RC Hums. 280/Theatre 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bert Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 280.001.

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Engl. 267. Introduction to Shakespeare.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jackie Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of Introductory Composition. (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 270. Introduction to American Literature.

Section 001 American Voices.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

One of the major themes in American literature is the "Americanization" of members of the various racial, religious, and ethnic groups within American society. This section of English 270 will follow the theme of Americanization beginning with pieces from Nathaniel Hawthorne, one of the writers in the traditional American canon, and continuing with novels and short stories from other American voices and talents including women, Chicano, Asian-, African-, Native- and European-American writers, selections which more fully represent "American" or United States literature. The class will be a mix of lecture and discussion and all students are expected to read and be fully prepared to discuss the works in class and on COW, a computer conferencing system on the Web. Requirements also include a final and a 6-8 page paper.

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Engl. 285. Introduction to Twentieth-Century Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will consider how a variety of writers reflect and respond to the major historical, social, political, philosophical, and moral issues and preoccupations of this century. The works we will study are eclectic and arbitrarily chosen; there is no attempt to be all-inclusive, nor will we limit ourselves to English and American authors. Our subject will be some representative works of modern thought and literature. We will place equal emphasis on what these works say and how they say it. Our purpose is to sharpen the insight and intelligence with which we read and analyze some of the probing "documents" of our time. Candidates for the reading list (availability of texts and reasonableness of prices will be factors) include works by Albert Camus, Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Arthur Koestler, Philip Roth, Saul Bellow, Friedrich Duerrenmatt, Jerzy Kosinski, Margaret Atwood or several others. Informal lecture and discussion, the amount of which will be influenced by the size of the class. Thoughtful, active participation "counts." Two papers (ca. 5-77 pp. each) and a final exam.

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Engl. 299. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 305. Introduction to Modern English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard W. Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Recommended for students preparing to teach English. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rwbailey/English_305.html

Though a requirement for students seeking certification as secondary school English teachers, English 305 appeals to a broader audience interested in the structure of English and its varieties. Topics to be discussed include: gender-based differences in American English and regional and social dialects in the United States, including African-American English, Appalachian English, Hispanic English, and Native American English; English as a rule-governed language, shaped by its history, and the history of ideas about good (and "bad" English). English 305 is designed for native-speakers of English (with no prior study of the language or of linguistics) who are curious about the language community of which they are a part. A midterm and final examination allow students to demonstrate the ability to make well-founded generalizations based on the material studied. Short papers invite explorations of domains of language.

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Engl. 310. Discourse and Society.

Section 001 The Henry Ford High School Project.

Instructor(s): William Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 124 or 125. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course teaches students to use their creative skills and social commitments to facilitate the powerful expressiveness of high school youth. It is rooted in respect for the youths' abilities and voices, in excitement about an educational process that promotes creativity, and in imaginative collaboration with the school faculty and administration. Working two to three hours a week at Henry Ford and Cooley High Schools in Detroit, Adrian and Maxey Boys Training Schools, Vista Maria, and Boysville, students assist youth in creating their own video tapes, plays, photographs, music, etc. In two hour class meetings we discuss background reading, analyze and develop our work with the youth, and teach each other hands-on methods. A further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. No exams. Admission to the class is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 AH for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

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Engl. 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 001 Fantasy.

Instructor(s): Eric Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~esrabkin/313Ff99syl.html

This course explores the nature and uses of fantastic narratives from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present, drawing texts from such widely different fields as fairy tales, science fiction, and the so-called New Novel. No special background in literature is required. The course requires attendance at two lectures and one discussion section per week. The written work for the course will revolve around a series of short papers and two medium-length papers. There will be no exams. Texts include: Household Stories of The Brothers Grimm; Tales of E. T. A. Hoffmann; The Portable Poe; The Alice books, Lewis Carroll; The Island of Dr. Moreau and Best Science Fiction Stories, H. G. Wells; The Complete Stories, Franz Kafka; Orlando, Virginia Woolf; The Erasers, Alain Robbe-Grillet; The Tolkien Reader; The Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster; Cosmicomics, Italo Calvino; The Dead Father, Donald Barthelme; Woman on The Edge of Time, Marge Piercy.

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Engl. 315/WS 315. Women and Literature.

Section 002 Women and Children First: Fictional Representations of Girlhood. This course will meet the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Virginia Shelton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine representations of girlhood in fiction of the 19th and 20th centuries. Readings will range from Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland to Arundhati Roy's recent Booker prizewinner, The God of Small Things. We will read stories of girls who accept their allotted social role, as Catherine Moreland does in Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey, and tales in which girls' struggle against those roles drives the narrative, as in George Eliot's The Mill on the Floss. We'll see how conventions of girlhood mesh with narrative conventions in Virginia Woolf's first novel, The Voyage Out, and how the intersection of romantic discourses with girlhood troubles Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita. The tentative reading list also includes Toni Morrison's Beloved, Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior, and L.M. Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables. Requirements: one short paper (5 pages), a long paper, weekly participation in an electronic discussion list, and a final. Students should also be aware that I typically require additional ad hoc writing. Such writing (and the email discussion list) is less formal than the two required essays. This course will meet the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 315/WS 315. Women and Literature.

Section 003 Desire in the Renaissance. This course fulfills both the New Traditions and Pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Valerie Traub (traubv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will introduce students to the wide variety of representations of eroticism in English literature of the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It is commonly thought that our modern age must be far more liberated and explicit about sexuality than previous eras. But in the last decades of the sixteenth century, circulating in manuscript versions were the first native English pornographic poem (about a dildo), an anonymous lyric advocating female-female marriage, and sonnets celebrating the beauty of a male beloved by the man who would soon be considered the greatest English poet. Renaissance revenge tragedies often depicted brother-sister incest, while cross-dressing plays exploited the range of desires enabled by confusions of gender. By the end of the seventeenth century, poems had been published expressing voyeuristic delight in watching one's love undress, describing the aesthetic allure of a woman's nipples, and making fun of male impotence.

What accounts for this extraordinary range of literary interest in forms of eroticism? In this class, we will suspend modern divisions between heterosexuality and homosexuality as categories of identity and ask more broadly, how did poets and dramatists represent erotic desire? What kinds of literary conventions, formal structures, and modes of address did they employ? How did the patriarchal nature of early modern society and the institutions of the patriarchal household and marriage affect erotic images and narratives? How common are expressions of homoerotic desire, and how do we know them when we see them? How is friendship implicated in discourses of eroticism? How are specific erotic practices represented, and does it matter whether the author is male or female? We will explore these and many other questions and topics, including the homoerotics of pastoral, the gender politics of carpe diem, and why Adonis chooses hunting a boar over having sex with Venus.

This course fulfillss both the New Traditions and Pre-1830 requirements for English concentrators.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 003 Literature of the American Wilderness. Meets with Environmental Studies 407.001. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): John Knott (jknott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is wilderness, and how have American attitudes toward wilderness evolved? The course will explore these questions and others about how Americans (including Native Americans) have perceived the natural world and their relationship to it, as these arise from texts ranging from the earliest writing about America to twentieth-century responses to Alaska. Readings will include texts illustrating the place of wilderness in the American imagination, such as Thoreau's The Maine Woods, Muir's My First Summer in the Sierra, Cather's O Pioneers!, Leopold's Sand County Almanac, Faulkner's The Bear, and Momaday's House Made of Dawn. We will also read poetry (Snyder, Berry, Ammons, Oliver) and selections from twentieth-century nature writers (including Abbey, Dillard, Lopez). Students will be expected to keep a weekly journal, to write a paper of about ten pages, and to take a final examination. Anyone with an interest in the literature and the issues it raises is welcome.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 004 Readings in Irish Literature.

Instructor(s): Richard Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How is it that this island nation with a population, north and south, of less than five million, has produced some of the most beautiful and powerful writing the world has seen? In this class we will get a sense of the history of Irish literature by reading a selection of fiction from the 19th century and before. Then we will take on the 20th century, when most of Ireland's literary masterpieces have been written. Among the books we will read are the novel Amongst Women by John McGahern, a novel and short stories by two Anglo-Irish cousins who collaborated under the name Somerville & Ross, a selection of poetry, and short stories by William Trevor. There will be brief weekly quizzes, one short paper, a midterm, and a final exam. Irish traditional music will be played every day before class begins, and one or two films will be shown. The class is taught in a multimedia format.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 001 Poetry.

Instructor(s): Laurence Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a poetry section; we will spend the term, in the workshop and in tutorials, discussing the craft and techniques of verse. There will be assigned exercises, but for the most part each student will work independently to develop the voice and style(s) most congenial to his or her talent. Students will keep a journal devoted mainly to their reading of poems and essays about poetry. At least one anthology will provide opportunities for conversations about contemporary poetics. Active participation in class discussion is an essential requirement of this course.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 002 Poetry.

Instructor(s): Lorna Goodison

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to help aspiring poets to develop their own voices. It will introduce them to new ways of seeing and shaping into poetry the everyday wonders which influence our lives. It will also suggest new ways of using literary and local language as part of the poetic craft.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 003 Fiction .

Instructor(s): Lorna Goodison

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 004 Fiction.

Instructor(s): Brenda Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this workshop we will focus on writing fiction, studying short stories selected from an anthology titled You've Got to Read This, and critiquing one another's works with thoughtfulness and intelligence. Evaluation will be based on workshop participation, written critiques, and a final fiction portfolio of approximately fifty pages.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 005, 006 Fiction.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 007 Poetry.

Instructor(s): Alice Fulton (slippage@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~slippage/teaching/teaching.html#anchor875030

This workshop is for those who love to read and write poetry and who wish to continue the serious study and practice of their craft. Although much of our time will be spent discussing student poems, we'll also analyze poetry and poetics from assigned books. Students will be asked to write a weekly poem, often in response to a specific catalyst or exercise; to write short responses to the assigned books; to post a review on the Internet; make responsible contributions to discussions; and to submit a final portfolio of at least 12 pages of poetry written during the term. There might be quizzes from time to time. Constant attendance is a must.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 008 Poetry.

Instructor(s): Rene Huigen

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will focus on poetry as another way of thinking. The point of view is not poetry as an expression of individual emotions, but the emphasis is on form and language as a medium to evoke them. This means that form and language are the starting point instead of lived through emotions. The inspiration of this course will be T.S. Eliot's adagio: "Poetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an escape from emotion, it is not an expression from personality, but an escape from personality. But, of course, only those who have personality and emotions know what it means to want to escape from those things." To illustrate this we will read poems and study ideas of poets like Fernando Pessoa, Carlos Drummond de Andrade, Cesare Pavese, and the Dutch poet Martinus Nijhoff. Next to this we will bring theory into practice by using different techniques and we will discuss each other's work.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 001 Ripening Memories: The Making of Meaning.

Instructor(s): Lillian Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"I am moved by fancies that are curled/around these images, and cling," says T.S. Eliot. In some significant ways a literary text may serve its reader similarly to a past life remembered, a memory, a dream. In this seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how that process works. How does an author carve a living, changing world out of print and paper? How do we carve our lives out of past lives our own and others? What do we choose to remember and what "to forget"?

We will, as the seminar progresses, find ourselves asking: "What actually did we hear and see in the past," both in our personal lives as well as in the lives of the characters we meet in the texts and films we read and view, respectively. It will be a fascinating story for us to unfold and we will find some fascinating authors to help us unfold it.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 002 Telling Stories on the Eve of the Millennium.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"We tell ourselves stories in order to live," says Joan Didion. We need "stories" narratives as well as essays to help us explain ourselves and explain things to ourselves. We also need stories to help us explain ourselves and events and ideas to others. On this, the eve of the millennium, this class will pay particular attention to those topics which raise interesting issues about the "brave new world" we are about to enter. This course will be reading texts and viewing films which illustrate some of the "stories," those that are enthusiastic as well as those that are cautionary about the coming twenty-first century. We will also be looking at those that explain where we are right now. You will fashion your own topics based on the readings. Requirements include twenty-five pages of formal, polished prose which has been revised several times, ten 2-page critiques and informal writing using e-mail and the Internet.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Heininger

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 004, 005.

Instructor(s): John Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Much like the English 225 courses I have taught over the last dozen years, this course will focus on: (1) improving your vocabulary; (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills; and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [ mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 006 A Nation of Immigrants. This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Central to the myth of the American Dream is the construct of the immigrant, those "tired" and "poor," welcomed to our shores, expecting to find "streets paved with gold," and "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness," limited only by their own energy and desire. Not surprisingly, some of America's most compelling literature is about and by immigrants who write of the promise and disappointment of that dream and of the inevitable conflicts between old-world ethics and new. This composition course will make their writings and the essays you compose in response to their ideas its focus. Our texts will be by Alvaraz, Doctorow, Hong Kingston, Coppola, P. Roth and other professional writers and by the writers in this class. Requirements: four 6-8 page essays; weekly writings on the readings; responses to each others' essays; active participation in class discussion; and regular attendance.

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Engl. 327/Theatre 327. Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Wendy Hammond (wham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Engl. 227. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 327.001.

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Engl. 350. Literature in English to 1660.

Section 001 This course meets the Pre-1600 Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Michael Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is the first of a two-term sequence designed to study the historical development of literature in English. Most of our attention will be devoted to close analysis of a dazzling variety of texts from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. We will work to foreground the historical, social, cultural, and intellectual issues to which these texts respond, and to interrogate our criteria for designating a text as "major." Writers to be studied include Chaucer, Marlowe, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, and Milton. The course features three hours a week of lecture; groups of twenty-five students will meet a fourth hour under the leadership of doctoral students to discuss the material further and to work on their writing for the course. There will be three essays of approximately five pages each, a midterm and a final examination.

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Engl. 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 001 This course meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Steven Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mullaney/Shakespeare.html

A study of Shakespeare's dramatic works, selected to represent his exploration of major genres over the course of his career. Although we will be reading the plays intensively as literary works, we will also be considering social and political issues in Elizabethan and Jacobean England in order to clarify the complex engagement of Shakespeare's stage with cultural controversies of his period. Our goal will be to appreciate Shakespeare and to examine the impact of his drama in its own day and its ramification for ours. The plays likely to be studied: A Midsummer Night's Dream; The Merchant of Venice; Measure for Measure; Hamlet; Othello; King Lear; The Tempest. The text used will be The Riverside Shakespeare. There will be a midterm and a final exam, as well as three relatively short essays.

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Engl. 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 002 Self and Society in Early English Literature. This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Karla Taylor (kttaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Some of the most fascinating and challenging works in earlier English literature worry about the problems that arise when people seek to find and understand themselves, both as inwardly defined individuals and as socially defined members of various groups: a marriage; a noble court; or a nation, for instance. Do self-discovery and social identity confirm and support one another? Do they undermine or even endanger one another? How does literature contribute to the quest for a self, whether in or out of society? We will read a variety of literary versions of the relation of self and society, including works by Marie de France, Chaucer, the Gawain-poet, Spenser, and Shakespeare. Requirements include class participation, several moderate papers and presentations, and a final examination.

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Engl. 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 003 Questioning Heroic, Singing Romance. (Honors). This course meets the Pre-1600 Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will focus on the reading and enjoyment of the dazzling variety of texts which made of the English tradition one of the major cultural streams in the West. At the same time we will explore the implications of these texts in and for political, social and cultural history more generally. We will give special attention in 1996 to the ongoing rewriting of the heroic, with its shifting models of male and female excellence and to Romance with its artful fables of desire. Readings will range widely from Beowulf to Roxanna, perhaps even to Blake's America. Major time will be devoted to Chaucer, Marlowe, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton. There will be two essays of approximately six pages each, a midterm, and a final examination.

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Engl. 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 005 This World and the Other in Medieval English Literature. This course meets the Pre-1600 Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Beaston

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We shall read a number of medieval literary masterpieces including Beowulf (in translation), Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Piers Plowman (selected portions), and the Book of Margery Kempe as well as selections from Middle English lyric and drama with an eye toward the writers' attitudes toward this world and the other. In our discussion of medieval views of this world and visions of the other, we shall explore literary conventions, sources (theological and popular), and cultural contexts. Coincidentally, we shall consider how these views and visions survive today. You will gain a great deal of experience reading Middle English. Texts will include Beowulf; Middle English Lyrics; Middle English Literature; English Mystery Plays; and The Book of Margery Kempe. Four short papers (3-4 pages), several in-class writings, and two examinations will be required. This course meets the Pre-1600 Literature requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 003 Augustan and Romantic Culture. (Honors). This course meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Andrea Henderson (akhender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is twofold: to sharpen students' interpretive skills in a variety of media and to introduce them to eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century British literature, visual arts, and history. We will begin by exploring the arts of the early eighteenth century. We will, for instance, discuss prosody and notions of social order in Pope's Essay on Man, read Defoe's Robinson Crusoe along with some of his economic writings, and read Reynolds' aesthetic theory alongside his paintings. As the course proceeds we will trace the development of Romantic aesthetics, reading Wordsworth's "Preface" to Lyrical Ballads and Shelley's Frankenstein while studying Romantic poetry and painting. Requirements include papers, a group presentation, and a final.

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Engl. 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 001 What Was Modernism?.

Instructor(s): Gorman Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore Modernism the style/movement that dominated the "high" art of the first decades of this century. While we will read a few poems (Eliot, Yeats) and glance briefly at some of the art and music, the focus of the course will fall primarily on fiction. Works to be read include Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Mann's Death in Venice, Joyce's Portrait of the Artist, Kafka's The Metamorphosis, Woolf's To the Lighthouse, Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover, Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, and Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. Course grades will depend on two essay exams, and frequent short, informal writing assignments. Regular attendance is essential.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 003 The Monologue in Fiction, Poetry, and Drama.

Instructor(s): Mary Zweip (mnz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will explore a variety of "monologues" from Victorian and Modern works, thinking as we go why a writer would choose to work with such a technique, discussing its advantages and limitations. The approach also allows a historical perspective, covering works written from the late 19th century to the other day. Readings will concentrate on fiction, but will also include poetry and drama, perhaps an autobiography. A tentative reading list will cover the dramatic monologues of Tennyson and Browning; the "interior" monologues of James Joyce (with selections from Ulysses), of William Faulkner (The Sound and the Fury) and of Louise Erdrich (Love Medicine); the first-person narratives of Henry James (The Aspern Papers), Ernest Hemingway (The Sun Also Rises), and Ford Madox Ford (The Good Soldier); and the third-person limited point of view in short stories from Dubliners. We will look at the "dramatic soliloquies" of Virginia Woolf (The Waves); a play by Samuel Beckett (Krapp's Last Tape); and the story-telling of Isak Dinesen (Seven Gothic Tales). We might make a case for a single speaker in T.S. Eliot's "The Waste Land," and explore the uses of the first-person in poetry (with W.B. Yeats and a confessional poet such as Robert Lowell or Sylvia Plath). Requirements: two papers, midterm, final, assorted informal "exercises."

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Engl. 386. Irish Literature.

Section 001 Inventing Ireland: 100 Years of Irish Cultural Production, 1898-1998.

Instructor(s): Eileen Morgan (emmorgan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

It is often said that Ireland has produced some of the finest and most prolific writers of the twentieth century. In this course we will study an array of literary and cinematic texts in an attempt to understand better the relationship between the nation's history of conflict and its rich imaginative life. Our particular focus will be the images and mythologies of the island and its inhabitants, through which Irish writers and filmmakers have attempted to define Irish national identity and aspirations, and spur social and political change.

Our survey will include works by figures who have achieved "canonical" status, or at least international reputations Yeats, Joyce, Edna O'Brien, Seamus Heaney, Roddy Doyle, and filmmaker Neil Jordan, for example. We will also read texts by lesser-known but important writers, such as Anne Devlin and Marie Jones. Students will be asked to write two essays of medium length (4-6 pages) and one longer essay on a research topic of their choice, and also to complete frequent pop quizzes, a midterm, and final.

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Engl. 406/Ling. 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an advanced survey of descriptive English grammar. We will look closely at the formal and semantic motivations for basic grammatical categories and processes in English (words, phrases, clauses, and sentences) and we will discuss how these structures contribute to the expressive potential of the system. There will be daily practice in grammatical parsing, weekly quizzes, and a final exam. The course should be attractive to those professionally interested in English education, practical criticism, or further work in linguistic theory as well as those generally interested in becoming more articulate about the structure of our language. Texts: Randolph Quirk and Sidney Greenbaum, A Concise Grammar of Contemporary English and John Algeo, Exercises in Contemporary English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 Reading Old English. Meets with English 501/German 501. This course mets the Pre-1600 Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Thomas Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the earliest texts written in English over a thousand years ago. We will begin with Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the first object of this class will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. We will conclude with the study of the later texts which continue the Anglo-Saxon tradition alliterative tradition. My chief aim is to help you develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

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Engl. 412/Film-Video 412. Major Directors.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for a total of nine credits with department permission.

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 Television Discourse Analysis: Narratology, Cinematography, And Response.

Instructor(s): Barbra Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How does television mean? How does television create meaning? What are television viewers engaged with? In what significant ways do viewers differ about the meaning of a text? In what ways are symbols, signs, and forms that represent people" lives, subcultures, and places in society made sense of through the articulation of values, priorities, and issues in the dynamic television landscape? Who and what rarely appear on the scene and how can we account for these absences? How do preference, pleasure, and creativity intersect with the forbidden, the dangerous, and censorship? There are three papers (5-6 pages of description and analysis, plus appended logging data) during the term; this includes two papers requiring content research and analysis, and one collaborative study which requires focus group research. At the end of the term each student designs and develops an individual content research and interpretation project of 8-10 pages. Oral reports on research findings are mandatory. Readings in the course pack accompany each of the projects; discussion of differing research methods and interpretive frameworks often require one page analytic critiques by class members, who lead discussion.

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Engl. 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 002 Research and Technology in the Humanities. Meets with English 516.

Instructor(s): Eric Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lsarth/RTHf99/415f99syl.html

This upperclass and graduate-level course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities, both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., Web sites and CD-ROMs). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that question the impacts of technology. By the middle of the term, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include at least information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, the meaning of the digital revolution, text analysis, and image manipulation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 001 Samuel Beckett.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Although Beckett is largely known as the author of a landmark play, Waiting For Godot, this seminar will examine his artistic accomplishment as a writer of BOTH drama and fiction. The accent will be placed on the relationships between the two genres as they inform the meaning of his work as a whole. After reading exemplary works selected from Beckett's "classical" period, class sessions as well as frequent writing assignments will be based on the problematic late works for stage and prose. This is a class about problems of genre, close reading, and experimental writing. The seminar will culminate in the writing of a final term project.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 002 Women and Space.

Instructor(s): Anne Herrmann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the relationship between women and space in twentieth-century writings by women as a way of thinking through issues of geography and identity. As elite women experience greater mobility, how do they represent their relationship to settlement, as settlement worker in Chicago or as colonizer in a settlement colony in East Africa? How are spatial metaphors used to describe the place of the woman writer, both inside and outside dominant culture, as in Woolf's A Room of One's Own or Steedman's Landscape for a Good Woman? How do experiences of dislocation, due to migration, travel, or transciency, enable relocation within written narratives? Readings will range from Jane Adams Hull House to Sandra Cisneros' House on Mango Street, from Jamaica Kincaid's A Small Place to Gretel Ehrlich's The Solace of Open Spaces. Writing assignments will include a short essay and a research paper.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 004 Literature in the Americas.

Instructor(s): Lem Johnson (eljay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The United States, Cuba, and Brazil, Argentina, Jamaica, and Mexico as well as Haiti, Peru, and Colombia these are places and cultures that have laid claim to and transformed the "New World" into various forms of "The Americas." Is there anything that they share? Are there certain basic images, certain kinds of cultural features, that "New World-ness" imposed on the art forms that each one these places has produced? What about the differences? How much of, say, Walt Whitman's "I hear America singing / The varied voices I hear" is there in Jose Marti's "Our America"? What does the Japanese Brazilian of Karen Yamashita's Brazil-Maru mean for the Japanese Canadian in Joy Kogawa's Obasan. And how does the Jewish America in Anzia Yezierska's How I Found America mean in relation to the Francophone Caribbean of Maryse Conde's I, Tituba, the Witch, or to Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior? Other writers, like Emily Dickinson and García Márquez, Arthur Miller and George Lamming (Barbados), will help us through a term of sorting these things out. The FINAL PROJECT for the term will involve a COMPARATIVE ESSAY, of about 15 pages, in which you deal deal with at least TWO of the cultural areas in "The Americas".

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 006 Poetic Form.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Why do blues and rap have the same meter as English medieval alliterative poetry and Vedic chant? Why does a sonnet have fourteen lines? What are the varieties of free verse, what do they do, and why do they exist? What is the essence of the villanelle? If you are interested in such questions, and want to explore them rigorously, this is your course. It's a course designed for poets, poetry-lovers, and scholars. By midterm, everyone will need to choose a research topic for a long essay and a report to other members of the seminar. Our range of consideration will include: meter; the poetic line; phrasal rhythm; stichic form; and strophic form. We will spend a lot of time trying to anatomize free verse, and most of our energy will be devoted to art poetry, but we will also look at listen to popular poetry, including songs and nursery rhymes. We will briefly consider world poetry in translation, but of course our primary focus will be on English poetic form. In terms of reading volume, the workload will be light (a course pack of 200 pp. and 4 scholarly books on reserve) but the reading itself will be intense (close, exact).

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 007 Epic and Romance in the Middle Ages. This course satisfies the pre-1600 requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Karla Taylor (kttaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Epic usually depicts war and the public, political emergence of nations, while romance focuses on private experience, love, and self-building. But many medieval narratives intertwine love and war, private and public, individual and social to give imaginative shape to the aspirations and anxieties of the aristocracy (12th-15th centuries). We will attend particularly to ways in which literary works resolve, negotiate, or suppress conflicts of dearly-held values: Does love foster reconciliation to one's social group? or is it profoundly antisocial? Can one temper the raw violence of knightly prowess with civilized courtly refinement? Readings include works by Chretien, Marie, Chaucer, and Malory, and a selection representing major stories (such as Tristan and Isolde), characters (such as Gawin, Lancelot, Guinevere, and Arthur), and varieties of epic and romance. Middle English works will be read in the original language. Writing: frequent short responses and a substantial research paper. Middle English works will be read in the original language; you should come to class prepared to learn Middle English.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 010 Rhyme & Time: A user's guide to prosody.

Instructor(s): Richard Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course offers you a chance to learn virtually all there is to know in one term about rhyme, meter, stanza forms, etc. This is a "singing school." We will approach the subject the way poets, professional and amateur, have always approached prosody by "studying/ Monuments of its own magnificence," as Yeats put it, and then trying to set up our own lean-tos.

The course has two aspects: one, historical and explanatory; the other, practical. The professor will offer a historical survey of versification in English, beginning with Old English alliterative poetry and moving all the way to contemporary free verse and beyond. On the practical side, each student will be asked, each week, to write in the verse form that is being studied.

Paul Fussell's Poetic Meter and Poetic Form will be a primary textbook. There will also be a course pack. Expect to read a lot and have a lot of fun.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 012 "The Pillager Smile". Communities of Ethnic and Indigenous Women at the End of the 20th Century. This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Betty Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The narration of Louise Erdrich's Tracks focuses on the post-colonial education of a native woman. In this course, we will explore how ethnic and indigenous women writers create communities of racial and gender compliance, without sacrficing "the Pillager Smile" the sign of ancestral histories and cultural resistance. We will do close readings of a selection of novels by Asian-American, Native American, African-American, Chicana, and Jewish-American to trace the thematic concerns and cultural anxieties that inform and shape these communities. There will be one class presentation, and a research paper due at the end of the term.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 013 Texts of U.S. Slavery, Race, and Labor. Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 495.001. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Xiomara Santamarina

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 495.001.

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Engl. 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Nicholas Delbanco (delbanco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A workshop course in the nature and technique of prose fiction. Classroom discussion will focus on student work with an average expectation of 10,000 words to be submitted during the term. Revision, written critiques of the work of other seminar participants; attendance at the Visiting Writer Series of readings will also be expected. Permission of Instructor required. Students who wish to enroll in the course should get on the Wait List at CRISP, then bring a manuscript for review to the first class session. A list of admittees will be posted soon thereafter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 3: Permission of Instructor Required.

Engl. 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and, to come up with fifty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required. Students who want to enroll in the course should get on the waitlist at CRISP and bring a manuscript to class the first evening. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 3: Permission of Instructor Required.

Engl. 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 001 My Life/Our World: The Arc of Narration in Essay Writing.

Instructor(s): Lillian Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Why you're only a sort of thing in his dream.. If that there King was to wake you'd go out BANG just like a candle!" says Tweedledum to Alice in Through The Looking Glass. We will, in this writing seminar, be exploring ways in which we can conceive of the relationship between imagination and reality as a continuing spectrum of experience: we want to, for example, see how we "write" our own characters of life and our own worlds within which we play the roles we write. Moreover, we want to learn how the blurring of distinctions between imagination and reality, between MY life and OUR worlds, can evoke a creative process in us that allows for superb analytical writing. Although our writing may begin with our own experience, we want to find ways in which we can create a rhetorical "I" who tells our tales with a convincing voice, a voice that finds a home in our reader's heart.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Eileen Pollack (epollack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an advanced writing course based on the premise that nonfiction can be as creative, moving, provocative, and eloquent as our best stories, novels, and poems. We will read a great many essays, articles, and books to see how masters of the genre use the various forms, styles, and voices of fiction and poetry to handle nonfiction material. For our own pieces, we will draw on personal experience as well as research, interviews, excursions to new places, and scientific (or not-so-scientific) experiments and inquiries. Students may shape the course around subjects that interest them (literature, the arts, popular culture, history, politics, science, travel); everyone will be held to the same high standards of literary creativity and rational thought. Our time will be evenly divided between mining published work for inspiration and critiquing student essays (each student will write and rewrite forty pages of new material).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): John Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Much like the English 225 courses I have taught over the last dozen years, this course will focus on: (1) improving your vocabulary; (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills; and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [ mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 426. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 427/Theatre 427. Advanced Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): OyamO (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 327. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 427.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, Permission of Instructor required.

Engl. 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This intensive workshop is for students whose poetry is so promising it would benefit from continued serious consideration. This advanced writing course is designed to help students produce poems of greater ambition and greater significance through the use of techniques and strategies that I hope fortify the commitment that the selected student writers have already made to craft and to the necessity of poetry in the lives of writers and readers/listeners. Poetry that matters is the goal. Poetry that strives to be memorable. Poetry that's not afraid to know something. While the emphasis will be on poems students write for the course, there will also be two required texts of contemporary poetry. At the end of the term, students will submit a bound chapbook of their work and will give a public performance. Permission of the instructor is required. Please submit five pages of poetry to my mailbox in the Dept. of English (3161 Angell Hall) by the first night that the workshop meets.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

Engl. 432. The American Novel.

Section 001 This course meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course surveys the American novel from its post-colonial beginnings through the closing of the American frontier, from its setting of pioneer farm to that of city tenement. We will ask such questions as: What makes a work "American"? What traits or themes do the texts in this course share? How does each book address such themes as work and leisure, community and alienation, home and wilderness, immigration and settlement? To what extent is a work's "American-ness" related to issues of gender, race, and class? What kinds of presumptions and assumptions about national identity do we as readers bring to bear on the American novels we read? What, finally, might such works reveal about the novel form as well as human experience in general? Including standard works by Hawthorne, Twain, Fitzgerald, and Faulkner, this course will also feature more recent additions to the American literary canon, such as Kate Chopin's The Awakening, Willa Cather's Death Comes to the Archbishop, Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, John Steinbeck's Cannery Row, Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony, and Toni Morrison's Beloved. Students will write six one-page papers-either close examination of a specific passage or a thought question. We may have impromptu quizzes on the readings, if needed. Class participation and discussion will be an important aspect of the course. This course meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Virginia Shelton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine important, influential, and sometimes just plain strange novels of the early 20th century. Centered around Joyce's Ulysses, the course will include readings of American, British, and Irish novels. The tentative reading list includes Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Forster's A Passage to India, Lawrence's Women in Love, Toomer's Cane, Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, and Barnes' Nightwood.

Requirements: one short paper (5 pages), a long paper, weekly participation in an electronic discussion list, and a final. Students should also be aware that I typically require additional ad hoc writing. Such writing (and the email discussion list) is less formal than the two required essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 434. The Contemporary Novel.

Section 001 Contemporary Gay Fiction. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for Englihs concentrators.

Instructor(s): David Halperin

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A broad survey of novels and short fiction by and/or about gay men written in English since the Stonewall riots of 1969, with special attention to the last decade. Has the possibility of an "open" (uncensored, unexpurgated) gay male literature permitted a better or truer representation of gay men and gay male life? What experiences does this literature take in and what does it leave out? To what extent does it function as a means of defining or fashioning gay male identity and to what extent does it resist or refigure that identity? What literary structures does it employ, and what is the relation, if any, between gay male desire and literary form? Is this a minority literature or is it a universal literature that happens to be gay? What are the political or moral responsibilities, if any, of gay male writers in the age of AIDS? How do they write about sex, and why? Where are the happy endings that gay liberation promised us? Novels to be read will include Neil Bartlett, Ready To Catch Him Should He Fall; Melvin Dixon, Vanishing Rooms; Alan Hollinghurst, The Swimming-Pool Library; Mark Merlis, American Studies; V.S. Naipaul, In A Free State; Dale Peck, Fucking Martin; and Christos Tsiolkas, Loaded. Two short essays, a longer final essay, and a final exam. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 440. Modern Poetry.

Section 001 This course meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Laurence Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we shall study the major poetry in English of the period 1900-1940. Our principal subject matter will be work by the most important poets Thomas Hardy, W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, D.H. Lawrence, H.D., W.C. Williams, Marianne Moore, Robert Frost, Hart Crane, Wallace Stevens but we will also devote some time to special topics like Imagism, the poetry of The Great War, and the Harlem Renaissance, as well as to the social, historical, and literary backgrounds of modern poetry. The objective of the course is a clear understanding of the techniques and themes of modern poetry, which are especially significant because they continue to influence and inform the poetry of our own time. The format is lecture and discussion. Requirements include two papers, a midterm, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 443/Theatre 321. History of Theatre I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Knopf (robknopf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~robknopf/thtr321.html

See Theatre and Drama 321.001.

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Engl. 443/Theatre 321. History of Theatre I.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Leigh Woods (lawoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 321.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 447. Modern Drama.

Section 001 From Ibsen to Brecht.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the rise of modern drama in the Western world by concentrating on the work of Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Shaw, and Brecht. Emphasis will be placed on learning how to read a dramatic text for its performative qualities and its potential for enactment. Although no previous experience in the study of drama or theater is required, the course will begin by concentrating on the differences between the modern repertory and the forms we associate with Classical and Shakespearean dramatic conventions. Other topics of consideration include: the transformation from melodrama to modern drama; the social consciousness of the twentieth-century stage; and the rise of the female figure as subject of dramatic inquiry. Requirements: There will be three papers of 5-7 pages each; a midterm; and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 449/Theatre 423. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bert Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 423.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 4

Engl. 461. English Romantic Literature.

Section 001 True Lies: British Romantic Literature.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

I offer this course for a generation of students who would like a reason to take seriously the dusty fictions of the past. I invite them to experience a literature that established the norms of feeling, thought, and action structuring both "The English Patient" and most of the videos on MTV. This is (among other things) a quest literature, and the quest is for a more various, authentic, and intense career in living (and dying) than any social structure could accommodate. I teach this course in order to explore the pleasure-principle threading through the poetry and fiction of the age, and to see what it can teach us about the pleasures on offer in our own cultural economy. I call the course "True Lies" as a double reference: first, to the entertainment industry of our own time, and second, to both Sir Philip Sidney's and Percy Bysshe Shelley's definition of poetry as a higher form than history and philosophy, not despite the "lies" or fiction that poetry trades in, but because of them. Poetry "feigns images of virtue and vice" to show both the reality behind the appearance and the ideal beyond it. Readings: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Byron. Fiction: Scott, Radcliffe, De Quincey, Austen.

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Engl. 469. Milton.

Section 001 This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Linda Gregerson (gregerso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will study the work of a poet whom many consider to be the most compelling, and the most maddening, in the language. His subjects were large: the loss of paradise; the origins of sin; the interdependence of free will and obedience; longing and intellect; sex and the state. His technical mastery his sheer prosodic command is unsurpassed. His career confounds our latterday theories of separate realms: Milton was at once an ivory tower intellectual and a practical servant to the Commonwealth, a poet of empire and an anti-imperialist. His prose tracts make the case for regicide and revolution, for radical reform in religion, governance, and relations between the sexes, but he was also a consummate spokesman for unreconstructed patriarchy. Reading broadly in the major poems (especially Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes) and selected prose, we will try to understand how this poet and his era the complex social, political, and religious unfolding of the English Reformation transformed the written word. Student contributions will include regular class particiapation and two essays. The longer second essay will involve use of secondary critical sources.

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Engl. 470. Early American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 American Literature to 1830. This course meets the Pre-1830 and American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Scottie Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will offer you a broad introduction to the literature of North America from the first Spanish contacts through the period of the Early Republic. We will read, for example, the impassioned theological expressions of New England, narratives of captivity, conversion, and enslavement that emerged from the often violent crossing of cultures and races throughout the colonies, seduction novels by women, and the foundational documents surrounding the Revolution. My interest lies not in defining an American form or story, but in asking why certain forms emerged or were invoked and altered in response to unique historical situations. As texts which you discover yourself are often the most compelling, you will pursue a subject of your own choosing through research in microfilm and rare books, present your finds to the class, and incorporate them into a final paper. There will also be a short paper, a reading journal, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 471. Nineteenth-Century American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 Classic American Literature. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): James Mcintosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A course in some of the most engaging and demanding texts in nineteenth-century American literature, including Hawthorne's short stories and The Scarlet Letter, Melville's Moby-Dick and "Bartleby," Douglass' Narrative of a Slave, Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, Thoreau's Walden, major poems by Dickinson and Whitman, Twain's Huckleberry Finn and James' Daisy Miller. We will read good books rather than just study a historical period, but at the same time will pay attention to the historical trends and circumstances that inform the texts. Some subjects to be explored are: the willful originality of much American literature; the religious longings and skeptical character of the literature in an age in transition between faith and unbelief; the literary representation of landscape; the political strains of this literature in a society racked by slavery. Requirements: class participation and three papers.

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Engl. 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 Class and Money in American Fiction. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Gorman Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the interrelationships of class and money in some American fiction. These will range from the rags-to-riches success formula of Horatio Alger's Ragged Dick of the 1880s to Tom Wolfe's satire of the glitzy get-rich 1980s, Bonfire of the Vanities. In between we will read W.D. Howells' A Traveler from Altruria, Henry James' The American, Jack London's Martin Eden, Theodore Dreiser's Sister Carrie, Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth, F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Sinclair Lewis' Babbitt, John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, and Philip Roth's Goodbye Columbus. Grades in the course will be based on two hourly exams frequent short writing assignments.

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Engl. 478/CAAS 476. Contemporary Afro-American Literature.

Section 001 The African-American Novel. This course satisfies both the New Traditions and the American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Arlene Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The African American novelist Ralph Ellison wrote "I believe that true novels, even when most pessimistic and bitter, arise out of an impulse to celebrate human life and therefore are ritualistic and ceremonial at their core. Thus they would preserve as they destroy, affirm as they reject." This course explores the African American novel from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, investigating the ways in which these works "preserve as they destroy, affirm as they reject" aspects of the genre and its sub-categories (e.g., the Bildungsroman). As we examine the formal and thematic elements of the novels, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which Black folk culture, music, religious practices, and popular culture make their way into literary works. Some familiarity with African American literature and history will be beneficial to students enrolling in this course. Course requirements include two papers and a take-home final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 479/CAAS 489. Topics in Afro-American Literature.

Section 001 African-American Literature and the Politics of Civil Rights, 1954-1974. This course meets the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Marlon Ross (mbross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 274 and/or 320 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines ways in which the civil rights and Black Power movements shaped and were shaped by African-American writing from 1954 to 1974. We'll read a wide range of texts that voice conflicting views on the problem of race in America, and that demonstrate the changing attitudes toward strategies and solutions over the two decades. In addition to exploring major controversies like desegregation, interracial relations, nonviolence, patriotism and exile, nationalism, relations between Black men and women, we'll also consider the role of the mass media in creating or disturbing a sense of racial community. Some of the writers to be studied include: Lorraine Hansberry, James Baldwin, Paule Marshall, Alice Walker, Eldridge Cleaver, Amiri Baraka, Gwendolyn Brooks, Ishmael Reed, and Chester Himes. Several short writing assignments and a comprehensive final exam. This course meets the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 Samuel Johnson. This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Emily Cloyd (ecloyd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Samuel Johnson remains among the most eminent figures of English literature, whether we consider him as a contributor to or a subject of that literature. Coming out of the struggles of poverty and handicap, he rose through his own often despairing efforts to produce the first comprehensive dictionary in English, and some of the finest poetry, literary criticism, and fiction in English. The course will be built around Johnson, but we'll read and discuss the works of his friends as well: James Boswell's London Journal and Life of Johnson, Edmund Burke's Enquiry Into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, and Fanny Burney's Evelina. Computer conference, "Notes and Queries," a couple of essays, and a final exam. And, oh yes, an eighteenth-century dance seminar.

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Engl. 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 004 (Virginia Woolf and) Bloomsbury.

Instructor(s): Sara Blair

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In a 1923 memoir, Virginia Woolf asks of the literary movement she has come to embody: "Where does Bloomsbury begin? And where does Bloomsbury end?" In this course, we'll be concerned with the geographical, social, and imaginary place of Bloomsbury in metropolitan London and in modernity. Woolf's fiction will be at the center of our study; we'll also attend to the fiction, criticism, visual art, political writings and lifestyles of Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant, Johyn Maynard Keynes, and E.M. Forster, in order to raise certain questions: How do these figures position themselves with respect to traditional high culture as well as new forms of urban mass culture? What's the relationship between aesthetics and politics in their work and lives? How do the kinds of formal experimentation with associate with Woolf and Bloomsbury register or respond to the fluidity of urban or modern experience? Course requirements may include several short essays; a long final essay; midterm; active course participation.

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Engl. 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 Romantic Nature. This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Tobin Siebers (tobin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~tobin/html/E484.html

We all know that the Romantics loved nature, but how did they change the meaning of it? How did their love of the earth contribute to our love of nature, for example, to the ecology movement? We will study how the idea of nature changes within Romantic literature and its criticism. More importantly, we will study how the Romantic idea of nature transformed modern art and ecological consciousness. We will begin by looking at the writings of Rousseau, Goethe, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and their critics. We will end by looking at current ideas about land art, deforestation, strip mining, and the bomb. The course will also include visits from local artists interested in the relation between art and the environment. Each student will do a major project.

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Engl. 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 002 Rhetoric and the Achievement of Woman's Rights.

Instructor(s): Alisse Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL484.html

The vote for American women: was it a civil right or what some women called "an official endorsement of nagging as a national policy"? Women who wanted the vote in the United States argued that it was a civil right; women opposed to their own right to vote (and there were thousands who felt this way) argued that the ballot would give women "the opportunity to annoy and pester" political leaders. Most nineteenth-century American women had little or no access to political leaders, nor to higher education or the wages they earned, nor were they allowed to sign contracts or own property in the United States. But despite these rigid constraints and tremendous opposition, over a span of eight decades American women generated massive social and political changes. How? By using the only tool available to them: language. Clearly, what we say, how we say it, and to whom it is said can and does change the world. In this class, you'll learn to use rhetorical theory as a way to critically examine persuasive appeals. You'll also study speeches, actual letters and petitions sent to Congressmen, and newspaper and magazine articles and editorial cartoons from women and men who argued for radical changes during the nineteenth-century woman's rights movement. Together, we will consider the power of language to define, reform, and even revolutionize politics and society. Students will participate in class discussions and write brief response essays as well as one longer paper.

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Engl. 486. History of Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This will be an introductory survey of literary theory from the romantics to the present, but with emphasis on the exciting and absolutely fundamental changes that have taken place in the past twenty-five years. Major areas of study will include Romanticism, Modernism, New Criticism, Post-structuralism, New Historicism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism. We will be using various kinds of literary theory to help us answer basic questions about what and why we read, questions like: What gives us literary pleasure? Do authors determine the meaning of their texts, or do readers? How is literature related to society and politics? Can pornography be literature? Is there a difference between literature and propaganda? How are male readers/writers different from female readers/writers? On what principles was our literary canon established, and should it be revised? Mix of lecture/discussion, but with a strong emphasis on student participation. Two, possibly three short papers, and a final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 489/Education 440. Teaching of English.

Section 001 Concurrent Enrollment in Education 307.008 Required.

Instructor(s): Rex

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 489/Education 440. Teaching of English.

Section 002 Concurrent Enrollment in Education 307.014 Required.

Instructor(s): Anne Gere

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 489/Education 440. Teaching of English.

Section 003 MAC Students Only.

Instructor(s): Reeves

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arlene Keizer (arkezier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course assists you in conceiving and writing an Honors thesis your most important piece of work in English Honors. In the initial weeks we examine research methods in the humanities and clarify the nature of the Honors thesis (how it differs from a term paper, for example). The remainder of the course is devoted to nurturing and strengthening your individual project through a linked series of tasks (topic statements, notes on secondary sources, bibliographies, drafts of sections). You present your work in progress to the class, and read and critique your classmates' drafts. By the end of the term, you will have a 20- to 30-page draft of your thesis and a strongly focused sense of what changes and additions are needed before you turn in the final version in March. You should also have a clear sense of the demands and rewards of advanced work in literary studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Michael Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course assists you in conceiving and writing an Honors thesis your most important piece of work in English Honors. In the initial weeks we examine research methods in the humanities and clarify the nature of the Honors thesis (how it differs from a term paper, for example). The remainder of the course is devoted to nurturing and strengthening your individual project through a linked series of tasks (topic statements, notes on secondary sources, bibliographies, drafts of sections). You present your work in progress to the class, and read and critique your classmates' drafts. By the end of the term, you will have a 20- to 30-page draft of your thesis and a strongly focused sense of what changes and additions are needed before you turn in the final version in March. You should also have a clear sense of the demands and rewards of advanced work in literary studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 497. Honors Seminar.

Section 001 Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and Literature: Reading Freud Critically. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Suzanne Raitt (sraitt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Freud's theories have had an enormous influence on the way Western societies think about personal development, psychological processes, and family and sexual relationships, and they have also been central to many approaches to literary criticism. Our reading and discussion will be organized around Freud's understanding of sexual difference (and some feminist responses to it), and you will be introduced to a number of key Freudian concepts: the unconscious; castration; the Oedipus complex; fetishism; and the death instinct, for example. We will also be thinking about the usefulness of Freudian theory as a tool for the analysis of literature and language, and our reading will include some psychoanalytic criticism and some literary texts, probably by Henry James, Virginia Woolf, and Thomas Hardy. Other authors will include Melanie Klein, Juliet Mitchell, and Jacques Lacan. Students will be required to make an informal in-class presentation, and to write a final research paper. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 498. Directed Teaching.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 499. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

No Description Provided.

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