Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in History (Division 390)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for History.


History 110. Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Europe.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael Wintroub (wintroub@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4;3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~wintroub/

The first half of the European history survey course covers a sweeping period of over a millennium. The course is designed to expose students to general outlines and chronology of European history and to encourage critical, skeptical analytical thinking. To anchor our flying coverage of this long and varied time, we will focus on developments in culture (art, architecture, literature), social organization (family, community, gender relations), and in political organization and theory. Readings will include a textbook, primary sources, challenging interpretive essays. Lecture time will be punctuated by small-group discussions, and active participation is strongly encouraged. Slides will frequently accompany lectures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 121/Asian Studies 121. Great Traditions of East Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Holcombe

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


History 132/AAPTIS 100/ACABS 100/HJCS 100. Peoples of the Middle East.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary Beckman (sidd@umich.edu), John Turner (persons@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://cgi.www.umich.edu/~proflame/nes100/

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 100.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

History 151/Asian Studies 111. South Asian Civilization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sumathi Ramaswamy (sumathi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the civilization of India, that is, the region of South Asia consisting of the modern nation-states of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka. We will begin with the first Indian "civilization", that of the Indus Valley, and then go on to consider the political history of the sub-continent in terms of the formation of empire systems from 6th c. B.C. through the "classical" period and the establishment of Muslim rule in the 13th c. C.E. Against this background, we will study the following themes: kingship and polity; social and religious identities; the development of urban cultures, and commercial relations with a wider world; cosmography, geography and maps; and gender and sexuality. We will close with a consideration of India's encounter with the European world, the establishment of colonial rule in the subcontinent, and the formation of the nation-states of today. Course requirements include a midterm and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 152/Asian Studies 112. Southeast Asian Civilization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Victor Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most culturally diverse regions, home to Buddhist, Muslim, Confucian, and Christian civilizations. It boasts ancient monuments of surpassing grandeur and symbolic complexity. It was the scene of the bloodiest conflict since 1945, the Vietnam War. Until recently it had the world's fastest growing regional economy, and it remains an area of great importance to Japan as well as the United States. This course offers an introduction (and thus assumes no prior knowledge) to Southeast Asian history from the earliest civilizations, through the colonial conquest, the indigenous political reaction of which Vietnamese Communism and the Vietnam Wars were one expression and the contemporary economic scene. The course seeks to define Southeast Asia's uniqueness as well as its evolving ties to the rest of the world. Midterm, final, and optional paper. Two lectures, one discussion section per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

History 160. United States to 1865.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maris Vinovskis (vinovski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This lecture/discussion course will examine central issues and events in the history of the territories that became the United States, and the peoples who lived there, from the late 16th to the middle of the 19th centuries. Among the topics that will be considered are the territorial expansions of Europeans into the Americas; the creation of Anglo-American colonies; the social, political, and cultural orders of British North America; the creation of an independent American republic in the Revolution; and the destruction of that first republic in the War Between the States. The required readings will include both primary and secondary sources, and will be examined in weekly discussion sections. There will be both a midterm and a final examination, and active class participation will be expected in the sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 161. United States, 1865 to the Present.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mmontoya/hist161/

This course is an undergraduate survey of U.S. history from 1865 to the present. We will examine major social, cultural, political, and economic events that shaped the United States after the Civil War. We will focus particularly on: Reconstruction, Westward Movement, Industrialization, Progressivism, World War I, Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the Sixties, and Reagan Republicanism. This survey introduces the students to urban, labor, ethnic, and women's history of the time period through extensive use of primary sources. The students will be examined in weekly discussion sections over their readings of both primary and secondary sources. There will be a midterm and a final. Active class participation will be expected in the sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 171/German 171. Coming to Terms with Germany.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Fredrick Amrine (amrine@umich.edu), Geoffrey Eley (ghe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See German 171.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

History 195. The Writing of History.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"The Writing of History" courses offer students the opportunity to learn writing through the study of historical texts, debates, and events. Each "Writing of History" section will study a different era, region, and topic in the past, for the common purpose of learning how history is written and how to write about it. Students will read the work of modern historians as well as documents and other source materials from the past, such as historical novels, letters, diaries, or memoirs. In each case the goal will be to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level analytic papers. History 195 satisfies the first-year writing requirement. Each section will enroll a maximum of twenty students.

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History 195. The Writing of History.

Section 001 Christianity and Political, Social, and Economic Revolutions in Nineteenth-Century Europe.

Instructor(s): Edward Mathieu (eccm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Christianity has been throughout its history a driving force in society, and while the nineteenth century was "the archetypal period of secularization," it was also "a great age of religious revival." In this course students will explore the place of Christianity in the political, social, and economic 'revolutions' of the nineteenth century in Europe. Specific issues we will address are: 1) the ideas of the French Revolution and religiously based opposition to the Revolution; 2) the importance of religion in the formation of European middle classes; 3) religion and middle-class social thought and action, including middle-class mission work aimed at the lower classes; 4) proletarian responses to religion, and religion as a basis for resistance; 5) religion and the rise of the modern welfare state; 6) the place of religion in the awakening or inventing of national consciousness. Reading assignments will pair writings of historians with historical documents. Students will write short critical reviews focusing on three main issues: 1) grasping a historian's primary argument; 2) assessing a monograph's use of sources; and 3) examining the biases and circumstances of production of an individual source. As a midterm assignment, students will amplify one of these reviews into a larger critique, taking account of class discussions. A term project will focus on the analysis of a primary text such as a pamphlet or speech, a law, a set of images (such as political cartoons or pictures of religious parades), a novel, or a memoir.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 195. The Writing of History.

Section 002 The History of Childhood and Adolescence in Europe and North America in the 19th and 20th Centuries.

Instructor(s): Andrew Donson (donson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What was it like to be a young person in the 1950s, the 1920s, or the 1850s? What was it like to go to school then? Did teenagers date? Did they engage in politics? Is it possible that children and adolescents influenced history just like adults? These are some of the questions we will try to answer in this first year writing seminar. The course will introduce students to the burgeoning scholarship on the history of childhood and adolescence. It will also teach critical reading of childhood memoirs and other primary sources. Students will learn the art of historical argumentation and narrative as they design a final research project of their own choice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 195. The Writing of History.

Section 003 Transatlantic Encounters: The European Discovery, Conquest, and Colonization of the Americas.

Instructor(s): Kathy Camp (ckcamp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class will examine the creation of the Spanish Americas as an act of imagination and as the result of actions by Spanish settlers and indigenous inhabitants. Before 1492, there existed no place named "America." During the sixteenth century, thousands of Spaniards immigrated there. How was America both as an idea and a society brought into existence? We will begin with an examination of European and Amerindian societies prior to 1492 in order to understand the beliefs as well as the social and economic pressures present in each when they met. We will examine the figure of Christopher Columbus and ask how historians have interpreted his role over the centuries. We will look at the conquest through the eyes of both Spanish and indigenous chroniclers and seek to understand how historians' use of one or the other of these sources could lead them to different conclusions about Amerindian society and about why the conquest succeeded. And we will examine the creation of colonial Latin American society, asking how it blends institutions and practices from Spanish and Amerindian contexts. In pursuit of answers to these questions, we will read both texts written in the sixteenth century as well as more recent scholarship from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Course requirements will include roughly 150-200 pages of reading per week, several short reaction papers, and a longer term paper to be handed in at the end of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 195. The Writing of History.

Section 004 German Nationalism, 1806-1945.

Instructor(s): Jeff Wilson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The history of German nationalism is a compelling subject. It is at once a story of the triumphs and the tragedies of the modern world. This course will examine the development of various forms of German national identity and nationalism from their growing influence among intellectuals during Napoleonic Wars to their cataclysmic explosion under Nazism. Through the examination of several documents from the period (available in translation) and current historical scholarship, this seminar will introduce students to the critical analysis of texts and the use of evidence to construct arguments. These lessons will be reinforced by a number of writing assignments culminating in a research paper.

The aim of this course is to understand the history of German nationalism: who were nationalists, what were their beliefs, why were these ideas attractive to the German public, how did their appeal spread, and how did they change? In answering these questions, students will not only gain valuable insight into one of the central issues of German history, but will also develop an understanding of the workings of nationalism in general (an important project in light of recent events in the Balkans). In order to gain access to these themes, we will examine a variety of documents from the period, ranging from works of jurisprudence, folklore and history (itself an important element in the national project) to poetry, architecture and film. Alongside these primary texts, we will read the work of contemporary scholars to both contextualize our discussions and to examine how historians construct arguments. -

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 195. The Writing of History.

Section 005 Women and the Surrealist Revolution.

Instructor(s): Don LaCoss (donlacos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class is designed to teach students the skills needed to write an argumentative essay about the effects of ideas and images on the human experience over time. Exercises center on the crafting of paper topics, historical research technique, and the effective organization of primary source material. The course is organized around the history of women's participation in the revolutionary surrealist movement; we will study the ways in which surrealist women disrupted the dominant conventions of "good," "normal," and "beautiful" in the service of political and social liberation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 195. The Writing of History.

Section 006.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

No Description Provided.

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History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 History of Jewish Women from Talmud to Tekhines.

Instructor(s): Stefanie Siegmund (siegmund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this first-year history seminar you will be introduced to fundamental historical questions such as the relationship between law and social reality and the interplay of class and gender. You will do this while developing skills in reading primary (prescriptive and descriptive) sources, studying the history of Jewish women in pre-modern Christian and Muslim contexts (mainly North Africa, Spain, Italy and western Europe). Specific topics we may examine include: marriage, dowry, and inheritance; divorce, the 'agunah; widowhood; marital and extra-marital sexuality; concubinage, child marriage, slavery, and polygyny. We will also step outside of social history to examine the image of women in rabbinic texts written by men, the roles assigned to women in some aspects of rabbinic culture and the qabbalah, and the history of Jewish women's piety (including kashrut) and prayer in different Jewish sub-cultures. Grades will be based on active participation in the seminar and from a series of short papers and oral reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 Criminal Responsibility in Anglo-American History. (Honors).

Instructor(s): Thomas Green (tagreen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar deals with several fundamental issues in western civilization as they have manifested themselves in the Anglo-American past: the requisites for criminal guilt; the means of determining whether one possesses those requisites (typically, the criminal trial); and the most common justifications for imposition of punishment (retribution, deterrence, and reform). We shall study these matters in relation to two central ideas of freedom: political liberty and human free will. Special attention will be given to: the history of the jury as a "buffer" between the state and the individual or the community; the manner in which challenges to the presumption that humans possess the ability freely to control their behavior have shaped the institutions and ideas of Anglo-American criminal justice. Students will analyze and discuss primary sources and recent historical writings and will write several short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5; E-mail instructor (tagreen@umich.edu) expressing interest. DO NOT attend unless given permission to do so.

History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 003 Politics and Culture of Race in Post-1945 U.S. Meets with American Culture 102.001. Evening Meetings. on Sept. 13 & Nov. 11, 7-10 P.M. Required As Part of First-Year Intergroup Relations Seminars (FIGS).

Instructor(s): Matthew Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 102.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 197. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 The Rise of Environmentalism and Radical Science in Cold War America.

Instructor(s): Nicholas Steneck (nsteneck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Science, technology, and engineering were crucial components of American life in the decades following World War II. The Atomic Bomb, radar, electronic computers, space travel, penicillin, the Polio vaccine, open-heart surgery, pacemakers, and the discovery of the role of DNA in inheritance provided ample evidence of the power of science and the capacity of engineering to put science to work, presumably for the good of society.

This seminar will explore the disillusionment with science and technology that first emerged in the 1950s at a time when support for science and technology were supposedly at their peak. Throughout the term, the class will read in common one book on the 1950s, either David Halberstam, The Fifties, or another shorter work, and view several videos about the '50s. Additionally, teams of two or three students will study in common books or collections of articles from the 1950s that in one way or another criticized science, technology, or the institutions that supported them, such as the early writings of Rachel Carson. The class will also work jointly as a research team to categorize major political, social, and cultural trends of the 1950s for use in reaching conclusions about the forces that slowly changed the way Americans thought about science and technology.

Grades will be based on class participation, three short papers, and one oral presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 200. Greece to 201 B.C.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah Humphreys

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course presents a survey of history from human beginnings through Alexander the Great. Primary emphasis is on the development of civilization in its Near Eastern and Greek phases. Students need no special background except an ability to think in broad terms and concepts. In view of the extent of historical time covered in the course, a general textbook is used to provide factual material. There are two hour examinations plus a final examination. Discussion sections are integrated with lectures and reading.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 210/MARC 210. Early Middle Ages, 300-1100.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paolo Squatriti (pasqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to the transformation of the Roman Empire into Byzantine, Islamic, and west European successor states between A.D. 300 and 1000. The course focuses on the social, cultural, and economic developments in the barbarian kingdoms of Europe. Lectures are integrated with weekly discussion of early medieval texts; two short papers and two tests are the basis of evaluation of performance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

History 220. Survey of British History to 1688.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to the sweep of English history from Roman times until the Glorious Revolution. The first half of it is devoted to the Middle Ages and focuses on the formation of the English monarchy, the role of the church in politics and culture, and basic social and economic structures. The second half treats the early modern period (c.1450-1700) and concentrates on the growth of the state, the Protestant Reformation, the English Revolution, and the social and economic changes that followed the Black Death and played themselves out during the reigns of the Tudor and Stuart monarchs. No prior knowledge of English history is assumed in this course, and it is intended to serve as the basis for more advanced work in British history and to provide background and comparisons for courses in English literature and European and American history.

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History 250. China from the Oracle Bones to the Opium War.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chung-shu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course consists of a survey of early Chinese history, with special emphasis on the origins and development of the political, social, and economic institutions and their intellectual foundations. Special features include class participation in performing a series of short dramas recreating critical issues and moments in Chinese history, slides especially prepared for the lectures, new views on race and gender in the making of China, intellectual and scientific revolutions in the seventeenth century, and literature and society in premodern China.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 265. A History of the University of Michigan.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas Steneck (nsteneck@umich.edu) , Margaret Steneck (msten@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The University of Michigan has been a leader in shaping the modern American university. The course will examine this heritage and history from the perspectives of students, faculty, fields of study, administration, etc. It will explore the factors that have shaped the University and place it within the larger social, political, national, and international context. The only prerequisite is an interest in your University and its place in history. Presentation will be through lectures with slides. Grading will be based on essay/ objective exams; term project or research paper; photo quiz to acquaint students with central campus, its architecture and embellishment. Readings will be from a course pack and 2 or 3 required texts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 266(366). Twentieth-Century American Wars as Social and Personal Experience.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan Marwil (jmarwil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the American experience of war in this century. Lectures, readings, films, and discussions will focus not only on the military experience itself, but on how America's wars real and imagined have shaped the country's economy, politics, and culture. The course will also examine the processes of transmission and memory: how Americans who did not fight learned about those who did, and what all Americans have remembered or have been taught to remember about the wars of this century. Finally, we will consider how the nation's wartime conduct, at home and on the battlefield, has fit into long-standing social patterns and behavior such as our alleged propensity for violence. In brief, we will be looking at the American experience of war as inclusively as a term will allow.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 275/CAAS 231. Survey of Afro-American History, II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed as a survey of African-American people, politics, and culture since emancipation. From Reconstruction to migration, from world wars to mass social protest, we will assess how large-scale demographic and political phenomena shaped the daily lives of Black women, men, and children. As much as we shall focus upon the ways in which a unified Afro-American experience has been forged through ongoing forms of oppression, we will also consider how various factors including class, region, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and ideology contributed to substantial diversity within Black communities by the mid-twentieth century. Moreover, a major goal of the course is to complicate "race". at the same time we explore the rigid yet arbitrary practices of racial segregation ("Jim Crow") we shall also endeavor to discuss racial dynamics in the United States beyond binary notions of Black and white.

Throughout the term we shall work with the artifacts and crafting of history as well. Not only will we read primary documents and analyze cultural expressions, then, we are also going to spend time thinking about how scholars have written African-American history. Whereas this course is not a theory seminar, it is nonetheless concerned with theoretical and methodological approaches to understanding the past. Students who take this course should be somewhat familiar with the contours of African-American and/or U.S. history but prior work in either field is not a prerequisite. Furthermore, it is not necessary to have taken African-American History I in order to enroll in African-American History II.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 284. Sickness and Health in Society: 1492 to the Present.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin Pernick (mpernick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year students must obtain permission of the professor. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

From devastating infectious epidemics to the quiet suffering of malnutrition, health problems have both affected and reflected the evolution of modern society. The course will study four different historical periods, exploring such issues as: the effects of individual habits, environmental conditions, and medical innovation on public health; the role of ethics, economics, and politics in medical decision making; the changing health problems of the disadvantaged, including Native Americans, women, Blacks, immigrants, and workers; the changing meaning of concepts like "health," "disease," "cause," and "cure"; the dissemination and impact of medical discoveries; and the changing organization and power of the healing professions. We will focus on American history, although comparisons will be drawn to other societies. The course is a basic introduction, however, first-year students must obtain permission of the professor to enroll. Classes are taught in lecture format, and will include a variety of audio-visual sources. Reading assignments will range from modern histories to poetry and old medical journals. There will be two essay-style examinations, and frequent short quizzes. This is a challenging and demanding course. Those who miss the first meeting without advance permission will be dropped from the course. Required purchases cost $15, but additional required reading assignments, available on reserve or for optional purchase, cost up to $110 additional if bought.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

History 286/Rel. 286. A History of Eastern Christianity from the 4th to the 18th Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Fine

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course traces Eastern Christianity from the 4th through the 18th century. A broad survey course aimed at undergraduates of all concentrations, there are no prerequisites; the course focuses on both Church history and theology. It begins with Constantine's conversion and traces the growth of the Church, the rise of monasticism, the creation of the creed (the Councils of Nicea and Chalcedon), and the secession of the Eastern churches (Coptic and Syriac), the role of religious pictures and the iconoclast dispute and relations with the West (Rome) which were frequently strained before the official break in the 11th century. We cover the conversion of the Slavs and the eventual formation of independent Slavic national churches. We treat the fall of the Byzantine and Medieval Slavic states to the Turks and the position of the Orthodox under the Turks. Attention is also given to the Russian Church from the 9th century to the Old Believer schism and Church reforms of Peter the Great. Readings are varied. There is no textbook. A relevant paper of the student's choice, an hour exam, and a final are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 318. Europe in the Era of Total War, 1870-1945.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~baporter/syl31899.html

In 1945 Europe lay in ruins. Entire cities had been leveled by the destructive powers of modern warfare, and the cultural, political, and social norms of the pre-war world had been shattered. What made such violence possible, and how did ordinary men and women experience it? History 318 will explore the ideological, political, economic, social, and cultural forces that both caused and were destroyed by the savagery of the early 20th century. We will not only study the origins and consequences of World Wars I and II, but also the ways in which everyday life was transformed during this turbulent era. We will look at Europe from the inside (by studying relations of class, gender, and nationality), and from the outside (by tracing the ideology and practice of imperialism). Grading will be based on a midterm and a final exam, on active participation in a discussion section, and on two take-home essay assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 320. Britain, 1901-1945: Culture and Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kali Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine British culture and politics from the death of Queen Victoria through the Second World War, with particular attention to the nature and structure of politics and the state; the First World War and the processes through which the war experience of mass participation and trauma were understood; cultural and political debates in the interwar years; the growth of mass media; gender; the empire and colonial subjects; the Great Depression; British politics during the rise of Nazi and fascist governments in Europe; and the experience of the Blitz and World War II. Students will be asked to think critically about the various means by which national and personal stories are constituted, repressed, re-imagined, and deployed in debates about the meaning and uses of the past. Readings and other course materials will include autobiographies, novels, films, and photographs, and class sessions will include extensive discussion. No previous knowledge of British history will be assumed or required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 332/REES 395/Poli. Sci. 395/Slavic 395/Soc. 392. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephanie Platz (splatz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 395.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

History 346/NR&E 356. Environmental History and the Tropical World.

Section 001 Meets with RC Social Science 306.001 and SNR&E 556.001.

Instructor(s): Richard Tucker (rptucker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Social Science 306.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 350/Great Books 350/Amer. Cult. 360. Great Books of the Founding Fathers.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mills Thornton (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Great Books 350.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 361. U.S. Intellectual History, 1750-1940.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Carson (jscarson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jscarson/Hist361.html

America, one historian has remarked, is a nation of words. In this lecture course we will examine some of the words and concepts that have been central within American culture from the Enlightenment to World War II and how they have been articulated, debated, instantiated, and used at a variety of times and by a variety of people. Our approach, derived from the cultural history of ideas, will examine not just the world of thinking, but how those thoughts get translated into doing and making, and in the process are themselves transformed.

Our reading will include such major figures as Thomas Jefferson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, William James, and Langston Hughes, as well as a host of less well known writers, scientists, political thinkers, popular commentators and the like. We will focus throughout, however, as much on how the words are used in producing arguments, laws, social movements, consumer goods, and machines and on the technologies that make them available, as on the language itself.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

History 368/Amer. Cult. 342/WS 360. History of the Family in the U.S.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course aims to help students gain a perspective on the contemporary family by studying the development of this important institution in the American past. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing attitudes toward and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, childrearing, work patterns, and relationships between men, women, and children. We will explore race, ethnicity, and class; cover economic developments as well as shifting conceptions of the role of the state; and ask about the impact of these factors on family life. We will want to examine how much the family has changed over time and try to project, on the basis of historical evidence, whither the family is going.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 370/WS 370. Women in American History to 1870.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carol Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the history of American women as a group, as individuals, and as members of different classes, and racial, regional and ethnic communities. Using work, politics, and sexuality as organizing concepts, it focuses particularly on the significance of gender in determining women's experiences from the early seventeenth century to 1870. Special attention is paid to initial and continuing encounters of Native Americans, Euro-Americans, and African-Americans; to evolving constructions of "womanhood" and their significance for different groups of women; to the meaning of religious movements, wars, economic transformations, and demographic shifts for women's individual and collective efforts to determine the course of their own histories.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 374/Amer. Cult. 374. The Politics and Culture of the "Sixties."

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/F99/AMC374/

See American Culture 374.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 379/RC Soc. Sci. 379. History of Computers and Networks.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul Edwards (pne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Familiarity with computer concepts helpful but not required. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.si.umich.edu/~pne/rc379.htm

See History 379.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

History 381. History of the Jews from the Muslim Conquests to the Spanish Expulsion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stefanie Siegmund (siegmund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey major historic developments in medieval Jewish society under both Islam and western Christendom. Broadly, the course will look at the divergence of Judaism and Christianity, the rise of the Babylonian geonim, the social and cultural history of Jews in the Arab Mediterranean world, the emergence of Jewish communities in Medieval Ashkenaz, and the impact on Jewish society of the Crusades, the Reconquista, the emergence of the mendicant orders, and the Black Death. The course will examine the interaction of Jews with the majority culture, political structure, and economy, as well as changing cultural trends within Jewish society. The distinctive religious climate of the medieval period will serve as a unifying theme throughout. We will study primary sources as well as recent historical scholarship, and our focus will include the history of women as well as that of men. Class is conducted as lecture and discussion of texts with an occasional film or slide lecture. Requirements for the course: several short written and oral assignments, tests, and final examination. Prerequisites: None. History 110 and some familiarity with Judaism or Jewish civilization (Religion 201, Judaic Studies 379/HJCS 379, or similar) is recommended background.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

History 383. Modern Jewish History to 1880.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Todd Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course surveys Jewish history in Europe, America, and the Middle East from the mid-seventeenth century to the 1870s. It begins with the emergence of West European Jews from cultural and social isolation, discusses their political emancipation, and traces their efforts to modernize Jewish ritual and belief. The focus then shifts to Eastern Europe, where the world of tradition persisted much longer. The lectures on Eastern Europe will focus on the religious and social character of Jewish life in Poland and Russia, the development of Hasidism, and the first glimmerings of enlightenment in the mid-nineteenth century. The course will conclude with a look at the Jewish communities of North Africa and the Middle East. There will be an essay-type midterm, a 10-12 page paper, and a comprehensive final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 393. Topics in U.S. and Latin American History.

Section 001 History of the Civil Rights Era, 1940-Present. Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 358.003.

Instructor(s): Kevin Gaines

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will use a lecture-discussion format to survey the modern civil rights movement, in both its southern and northern phases, from 1945 to the present. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, with required texts including literature, memoirs, nonfiction, historical studies, drama, and documentary films. Required texts include Von Eschen, Race Against Empire; Carson, SNCC: In Struggle; Walker, Meridian; Baldwin, The Fire Next Time, No Name in the Street; Moody, Coming of Age in Mississippi; King, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community; Bell, Gospel Choirs; Carew, Ghosts in Our Blood; Riggs, Black Is, Black Ain't; Cade, The Black Woman. Requirements: One 2-page research assignment, 3 take-home essays, 5-6 pages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

History 394. Reading Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman.

Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Individual reading program under the direction of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Permission of instructor

History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 001 Jewish Responses to Antisemitism, 1870-1933. Enrollment Limited to Senior History Concentrators By Override Only. Check for Override Information At History Dept. 1029 Tisch Hall Before March 1.

Instructor(s): Todd Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The theme for this colloquium is how Jews in Europe and the United States responded to social and political antisemitism in the period between mid-nineteenth and the mid-twentieth centuries. Students will be introduced to a broad spectrum of individual and collective responses, including radical assimilation, "passing," self-hatred, conversion, emigration, anti-defamation activities, cultural nationalism, political nationalism, and revolutionary socialism. The course will consider the relationship between Jews' understandings of antisemitism and their responses and between these responses and the larger political and social contexts in which they took place. Prerequisite: a survey course in modern Europe or modern Jewish history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: WL: 2 for history majors; 4 for all others.

History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 002 Witchcraft in Europe. Enrollment Limited to Senior History Concentrators By Override Only. Check for Override Information At History Dept. 1029 Tisch Hall Before March 1.

Instructor(s): Valerie Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Attitudes toward witchcraft prove to be extremely revealing as a way to understand early modern society, community structure, gender relations, intellectual and religious attitudes, and legal culture. The phenomenon of witchcraft has produced an enormous array of modern reactions, ranging from historical and anthropological analyses, to satanic and feminist revivals of witchcraft practice, to popular, sensationalized novels and movies.

This course is designed to expose students to the wide variety of mystical, political, literary, historical, and anthropological approaches taken toward the subject of witchcraft. Students will read and interpret trial records, diaries, sermons, and modern popular and scholarly works, from the fifteenth-century Hammer of Witches to The Wizard of Oz. Geographically, material ranges from Salem, Massachusetts, to Russia. Requirements: participation in weekly lecture and discussion sections, oral presentations, several short papers, and a longer research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 2

History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 003 Medicine and Health in U.S. Culture Since 1875. Meets with American Culture 496.002. Enrollment Limited to Senior History Concentrators By Override Only. Check for Override Information At History Dept. 1029 Tisch Hall Before March 1.

Instructor(s): Martin Pernick (mpernick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Unprecedented technical advances and cultural changes transformed the health of Americans and the power of the healing professions since 1875. This course examines how gender, race, ethnicity, economics, politics, and changing cultural meanings of disease and science combined with new technical discoveries to alter medicine, health, and society. Class is discussion format, with occasional brief lectures. Students are expected to read and discuss thoughtfully about 150 pages per week, drawn from often-divergent sources. A 15 page paper based on original historical research, a weekly journal, and two 5-page book review papers are required. Those absent from the first class without advance permission WILL BE DROPPED from the course. Cost:1-5. Required purchases cost about $25 but additional required reading available on reserve may be purchased for about $125.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1-5. Required purchases cost about $25 but additional required reading available on reserve may be purchased for about $125. Waitlist Code: WL: 2 for history majors; 4 for all others.

History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 004 Court Narratives: Gender and Justice in the U.S. Meets with American Culture 496.003. Enrollment Limited to Senior History Concentrators By Override Only. Check for Override Information At History Dept. 1029 Tisch Hall Before March 1.

Instructor(s): Carol Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will focus on a series of trials and other matters of law that illuminate the history of women and gender relations in the United States. Beginning with prosecutions involving slander, rape, infanticide, illicit sex, heresy, and witchcraft in 17th-century British and Spanish colonies and ending with 20th-century legal battles over employment discrimination, reproductive rights, sexual harassment, and surrogate mothering, our approach will be to examine judicial proceedings as sites of competing "stories in the law" told about gender, race, class, and ethnicity. A primary concern will be how these stories have been narrated in and beyond the courtroom. We will also ask what they tell us about continuities and changes in constructions of womanhood and manhood, in the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and in the relations of power within families and among different groups of men and women.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: WL: 2 for history majors; 4 for all others.

History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 001 History of Children in Japan. Enrollment Limited to Senior History Concentrators By Override Only. Check for Override Information At History Dept. 1029 Tisch Hall Before March 1.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Uno

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Has childhood been constant in history? Part of an answer can be uncovered through examination of continuities and change in historical experiences of children in Japanese households and society. In the first unit of the course we will analyze a variety of approaches to children's history in Japan and other societies. In units two and three, we will consider the culture and social institutions surrounding Japanese children in premodern and modern times through documents, literature, and secondary readings, with particular attention to nineteenth- and twentieth-century developments in unit three. Open to nonspecialists and specialists in Asian or Japanese history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: WL: 2 for history majors; 4 for all others.

History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 003 Orientalism and Western Film. Enrollment Limited to Senior History Concentrators By Override Only. Check for Override Information At History Dept. 1029 Tisch Hall Before March 1.

Instructor(s): Juan Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syls.htm

This course will involve a study of Western cinematic depictions of episodes in Middle Eastern and South Asian history. It will involve showings of the films, readings in the academic historiography surrounding those episodes, readings in film criticism, and consideration of issues in the representation of the Other along the lines of Edward Said's classic Orientalism. Students will write weekly short precis on the film topics, as well as a longer 10-page term paper, and will participate in a weekly discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: WL: 2 for history majors; 4 for all others.

History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 004 African Americans and the Politics of Culture. Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 394.001.

Instructor(s): Penny von Eschen

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the politics of African American cultural production from the turn of the century through the 1970s. We will emphasize Black artists' historic stuggles over race and representation. We will look at a range of the expressive and visual arts and consider the interconnectedness of these forms of cultural expression.

Texts will include:

Hazel Carby, Race Men
Angela Davis, Blues Women: Feminist Legacies
Samuel Floyd, The Power of Black Music
Sterling Stuckey, Going Through the Storm
Brian Ward, Just My Soul Responding

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 005 European Peasants. Enrollment Limited to Senior History Concentrators By Override Only. Check for Override Information At History Dept. 1029 Tisch Hall Before March 1.

Instructor(s): Paolo Squatriti (pasqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course investigates one of the crucial elements in the development of European cultures, peasantries. It treats the history of this "people without history," the workers in the fields and forest of Europe, from the Middle Ages to modern times. It thus focuses on agriculture and agricultural practices; village and community life; rural religiosity; relations between peasants and the state, including rural rebellion; and the image of the peasantry held by other social groups. Several brief reports, oral and written, and a term paper are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: WL: 2 for history majors; 4 for all others.

History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 006 Witchcraft in Europe. Enrollment Limited to Senior History Concentrators By Override Only. Check for Override Information At History Dept. 1029 Tisch Hall Before March 1.

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Attitudes toward witchcraft prove to be extremely revealing as a way to understand early modern society, community structure, gender relations, intellectual and religious attitudes, and legal culture. The phenomenon of witchcraft has produced an enormous array of modern reactions, ranging from historical and anthropological analyses, to satanic and feminist revivals of witchcraft practice, to popular, sensationalized novels and movies.

This course is designed to expose students to the wide variety of mystical, political, literary, historical, and anthropological approaches taken toward the subject of witchcraft. Students will read and interpret trial records, diaries, sermons, and modern popular and scholarly works, from the fifteenth-century Hammer of Witches to The Wizard of Oz. Geographically, material ranges from Salem, Massachusetts, to Russia. The course is designed as a Junior/Senior seminar for History majors and other interested students, with stress on analytical discussion and writing. Requirements: participation in weekly lecture and discussion sections, oral presentations, several short papers, and a longer research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: WL: 2 for history majors; 4 for all others.

History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 007 Race, Gender, and Empire in the Nuclear Age. Meets with RC Social Science 374.001.

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Hecht (hechtg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/1999/fall/lsa/rcsocs/374/001.nsf

See RC Social Science 374.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 399. Honors Colloquium, Senior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudi Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors student, Hist. 398, and senior standing. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: permission of instructor

History 400. Problems in Greek History I.

Section 001 Democracy in Classical Athens: Anything to do with Modern Democracy?.

Instructor(s): Beate Dignas

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will treat origins, developments, and facets of Greek democracy. We will look at constitutional, administrative, and social factors that shaped Athenian society in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. Topics will include the role of political leadership, religion, women, law and courts, and slavery. A central aim of the course will be to explore the evidence. How do ancient philosophers and historians, how do inscriptions, art, and architecture reflect and explain the workings of ancient democracy? How do we interpret these pieces of information? Towards the end of the semester the focus will be on comparison and retrospective. Where do we place ancient democracy with regard to modern political thought and moral values? Does classical Athens enhance our understanding of politics today?

Participants will be asked to engage deeply with primary and secondary sources, to give presentations on a chosen topic, to contribute to all discussions, and to write some papers or tests. Readings will include ancient texts in translation, such as Aristotle's "Constitution of Athens," Thucydides' "History of the Peloponnesian War," Xenophon's "A History of my Times," some comedies by Aristophanes, and Plato's "Apology" and "Gorgias" (all available in Penguin translations). Modern scholarship will include J.K.Davies, Democracy and Classical Greece, M.I.Finley, Democracy Ancient and Modern, and J.Ober, Mass and Elite in Democratic Athens.

No prerequisites, everyone welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 412/MARC 414. Social and Intellectual History of the Florentine Renaissance.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Diane Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How did a medieval city of bankers and cloth merchants become, in the fifteenth century, the center of an original humanist culture that offered Europeans new ways of seeing and portraying themselves and their society from artistic perspective to the writing of history? The course will trace the history of renaissance Florence not only as a chronicle of its development but also as the process by which it self-consciously constituted itself as a society and a history. Among the topics taken up will be the reshaping of the city, both physically and constitutionally; the transformation of the Medici from bankers to humanist rulers; the development of humanism into an enabling code for civil life; the new valuation of wealth and the civic use of magnificence (from palaces to wedding and funeral processions); social organization and changing attitudes toward the disempowered (slaves, Jews, the poor, women); and forms of religious expression, from confronternal devotions and processions to the fire and brimstone of prophetic preachers (e.g., Savonarola). Considerable use will be made of original sources (historical, literary, and visual). This is designed as a lecture course, but there will be ample time allotted for discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

History 430. History of the Balkans from the Sixth Century to 1878.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Fine

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A general survey of the Balkans (including Medieval Greece, Bulgaria, Serbia, Croatia, and Bosnia and the relations of these states with Byzantium and Hungary) from the arrival of the Slavs in the 6th and 7th century through the Turkish period to the 19th century independence struggle and state creation of the Serbs and Greeks. The reading list consists of monographs, articles, and a few translated sources. The reading list can be altered (with permission of the instructor) and to accommodate special interests. There will be an hour exam, a paper (topic to be chosen by student with permission of the instructor) of about 15 pages, and a final exam. Students who prefer to write a major paper (ca. 25 pages) can skip the hour exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 433. Imperial Russia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Deborah Field

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A history of Russia from Peter the Great to 1917, with emphasis on society transformations and continuities in elite and popular cultures, autocratic and opposition politics, economic and social structures. Students will read and interpret political documents and fiction, in addition to secondary works. Requirements: participation in discussions, two short essays, midterm exam, final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 or 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 438. Eastern Europe from 1500 to 1900.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~baporter/syl43899.html

This course will survey the history of Eastern Europe up to 1900, concentrating on the lands now included within Poland, Lithuania, Ukraine, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary. We will explore the development and collapse of a political and social system marked by both unparalleled liberties for the nobility and crushing oppression for the peasantry. East European history has been shaped by the interactions of two great religions Christianity and Judaism and we will discover some of the rich diversity within each tradition. In this course we will see how the cultural and ethnic divisions of the region took shape over the centuries, and how the sometimes violent, sometimes creative force of nationalism assumed its modern form. By looking at a region which always sat precariously on the boundaries of that elusive concept called "Europe," we will critically examine the questions of economic and social underdevelopment which remain so important in our own day.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 442/AAPTIS 461. The First Millennium of the Islamic Near East.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu), Rudi Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/F99/HS442/

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 461.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

History 443/AAPTIS 487. Modern Middle East History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juan Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syls.htm

This lecture course surveys the emergence of the modern Middle East from the three great Muslim empires of the early modern period, the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal. It discusses both indigenous developments and the Western impact in the nineteenth century, looking at reform bureaucracy and millenarian movements as responses to these changes. We then examine the rise of nationalism and the break-up of the Ottoman Empire during and after WW I, and these phenomena are seen as the context for the beginnings of the Palestine issue. Attention is paid to the interwar efforts at building strong states in the region, whether in the Turkey of Ataturk, the Iran of Reza Shah, or Wafdist Egypt. The last part of the course looks at the rise of socialist and pan-Arab ideologies, as well as of opposing ideologies such as Islamic activism after WW II. The impact of petroleum, the Palestinian issue, the turn toward bourgeois liberalism, and Shi'ite movements such as the Iranian Revolution and the Hizbullah phenomenon in Lebanon, and the Gulf War of 1991, will all be addressed in this section. Students will take a midterm and a final examination, and will write a ten-page term paper on a subject of their choosing. Reading in this course comes to about 150 pages per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 446/CAAS 446. Africa to 1850.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mamadou Diouf

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is an introduction to the peoples and cultures of sub-Saharan Africa. It begins with a survey of the origins of man and early African civilizations and concludes with the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 451. Japan Since 1800.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Uno

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will explore the history of Japan from the dissolution of a semi-feudal system in the 18th and early 19th centuries to Japan's rise as a world economic power in the latter half of the 20th century. We will address both the major historical themes during these two centuries of radical transformation and the issues at stake in historical interpretation. The course covers:

  1. the decline of official power during the Tokugawa era and the rise of a new plebeian public sphere;
  2. Japan's coerced entry into the world market;
  3. the consolidation of a modern nation-state, industrialization, and the beginnings of Japanese imperialism in Asia;
  4. the rise of social protest and mass culture;
  5. political reaction and militarism;
  6. defeat in the Pacific War and the U.S. Occupation;
  7. postwar recovery and the contested emergence of a conservative hegemony;
  8. myths and realities of Japan's new affluent "information society."

Class sessions will combine lecture, discussion and audio-visual. Assignments: brief critical summaries of readings, discussion panels, in-class midterm, final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The major theme of this course is "emancipation" of Southeast Asia, a historical confrontation between the societies of the region and the imagined global community of "developed" nations. Geographic coverage will include the principal countries of the mainland (Burma, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos) and the island world (Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore, and the Philippines). Lectures and reading assume no prior knowledge of the region. There will be a midterm, a final, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

History 454. The Formation of Indian Civilization to 320 A.D.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas Trautmann (ttraut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/humin/TT/course.html

This course is about the beginnings of Indian civilization, from about 2500 BC when it first appeared in the Indus valley to the start of the Gupta empire in which it reaches its classic form. It is a lecture survey, which will deal with all aspects of Indian civilization in its formative phase. It presumes no prior study of India on the part of any of its participants (except the professor). Both undergraduate and graduate students are welcome. (The subsequent history of classical India and the coming of Islam will be dealt with in History 455, to be offered next year, but each course is self-contained and you need not elect the other.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 460. American Colonial History to 1776.

Section 001 Peoples of Early America.

Instructor(s): Susan Juster (sjuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. (3). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Colonial America" focuses on the people of the time, often encountered speaking in their own voices, and on their broad cultural characteristics and problems as settlers first encountered the New World and its inhabitants and matured into colonial societies. Through weekly discussion of primary documents and historical studies, we will explore some of the key themes of early American history from the vantage point of the historical actors themselves: the clash between Puritanism and capitalism; the confrontation between Native American and European cultures; the emergence of a native gentry in the colonial South; and the enslavement of Africans and their transportation to the New World. History 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. Students will be expected to read closely each week (average 150 pages/week), take a midterm exam, and write several short essays and a long research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 466. The United States, 1901-1933.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sidney Fine (sidneyf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is concerned with the progressive era, the era of World War I, the 1920's, and the Great Depression. The emphasis is on political history and foreign relations, but considerable attention is given to social, cultural, and economic factors and to the position of minority groups and women in American society. There is no textbook for the course, but several paperbacks are assigned. Course requirements include a midterm, a final examination, and a paper. History 466 is a lecture/discussion course. Undergraduates electing this course must register for Section 001 and one discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 476/Anthro. 416. Latin America: The Colonial Period.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Frye (dfrye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dfrye/

See Cultural Anthropology 416.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Section 001 Literature and Social History, Brazil: 1850-1920. Meets with Portuguese 474.001 and Latin American and Caribbean Studies 455.002. Students electing this course for Language Across the Curriculum Credit must also register for UCourses 490.002.

Instructor(s): Sidney Chalhoub

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In writing their stories, 19th- and early 20th-century Brazilian novelists sought to describe and interpret the history of the nation since independence. As is the case elsewhere, such novelists thought that writing fiction was to analyze social transformations, to debate the meaning of history and to project the future of the nation. The course will focus primarily on the evidence regarding changes in the politics of social dominance prevailing in the period from slavery and paternalism to the worlds and meanings of "free" labor. Thus, questions of race, class, and gender in the more general context of defining and setting the new limits of citizenship rights will be emphasized. Authors and books to be studied include (tentatively): Manoel Antônio de Almeida, Memórias de um Sargento de Milícias; José de Alencar, Tronco do Ipê; Aluísio Azevedo, O Mulato and O Cortiço; Adolpho Caminha, O Bom Crioulo; Lima Barreto, O Triste Fim de Policarpo Quaresma; Machado de Assis, Helena, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas, Dom Casmurro, and Papéis Avulsos (short stories).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Section 002 Epidemics and Social History. Meets with Latin American and Caribbean Studies 455.001.

Instructor(s): Sidney Chalhoub

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will consider different ways that urban populations and policy-makers responded to epidemics such as yellow fever, cholera, and smallpox, that ravaged diverse urban centers in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. A major focus will be the role of epidemics in the construction of theories of "civilization" and "scientific" racism in Latin American, U.S., and European cities. Finally, the course will consider popular healing practices that competed with official methods of disease control in Brazil, particularly those derived from Afro-Brazilian medical knowledge and practices.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 491/Econ. 491. The History of the American Economy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 or 102. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/1999/fall/lsa/econ/491/001.nsf

See Economics491.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

History 551. Social and Intellectual History of Modern China.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ernest Young (epyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~epyoung/ModChina.html

In this course we will treat a selected set of major aspects of Chinese history from the 18th century to the present. A central task will be to sort out the roots, processes, and consequences of the Chinese revolution. We shall examine the testimony of conservatives as well as revolutionaries, of Confucians as well as Marxists. Among the topics will be: secret societies and religious cults; trends in Confucian thought and the role of popular culture; Christian missions and imperialism; nationalism and ethnicity; women's liberation; cultural iconoclasm and neotraditionalism; Marxism and the Chinese peasant, Maoism and its debunking. Previous familiarity with the broad outline of events will be useful but is not required. Readings will be drawn from analytical literature and translated documents. Participants will be asked to write two papers and take a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

History 569/LHC 412 (Business Administration). American Business History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Lewis (lewisdl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior, senior, or graduate standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A study of the origins, development, and growth of business. The course traces the beginnings of business enterprise in Europe and describes business activities during the American colonial, revolutionary, and pre-Civil War periods. It then discusses economic aspects of the Civil War, post-Civil War industrial growth, business consolidation and the anti-trust movement, economic aspects of World War I, business conditions during the 1920s, effects of the 1929 depression and the New Deal upon business, economic aspects of World War II, and a multitude of recent business developments and trends.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

History 572/Amer. Cult. 533/CAAS 533. Black Civil Rights from 1900.

Section 001 The Origins of Black Studies.

Instructor(s): Kevin Gaines

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 533.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

History 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 001 France, Africa, and Genocide: A Focus on Rwanda. (2 credits). Meets Sept. 13- October 25 (Drop/Add deadline=September 28). Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 490.001 and French 636.001. Undergraduates with Permission of Instructor Only.

Instructor(s): Jose Kagabo

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Seminar-style mini-course devoted to considering the history and politics of France's relations with Africa, with a particular focus on genocide and human rights in Rwanda, including France's involvement therein. Course will be taught by the Rwandan historian, Dr. Jose Kagabo, visiting UM from the Ecole des Hautes Etudes in Paris. Several other faculty with relevant expertise, including Frieda Ekotto of the French Department, Fred Cooper and Nancy Hunt from History, and Mamadou Diouf, Visiting Professor in History and CAAS (from CODESRIA in Dakar, Senegal), will be seminar participants. Discussion will be in English. About one third of the readings and films will be in French. A knowledge of French is not necessary, though French speakers and readers are encouraged to take this course. Course readings will include historical, contemporary political, and literary texts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 002 Narrative, Case Files, and Women's Health. (1 credit). Meets September 30-October 21 (Drop/Add deadline=October 6). Meets with Women's Studies 698.002.

Instructor(s): Nancy Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu) , Timothy Johnson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This one-credit mini-course will meet jointly with a one-month intensive rotation for fourth-year medical students, and these medical students will also be taking a Rackham Interdisciplinary Seminar on the Body entitled "The Body and Its Disciplines" (799.570, sec. 002/ German 379.499, sec. 001/ Comp. Lit. 354.750, sec. 001), taught by Prof. Silke-Maria Weineck. "Narrative, Case Files, and Women's Health" will consider issues of medical practitioners' stories and patients' illness narratives as revealed in diaries and ethnographic, medical, and social work case files. The approach will be historical, anthropological, multicultural, and biomedical. For each of the four weeks, we will consider a different body of doctor stories, illness narratives, and/or medical case files related to a particular theme in women's reproductive health. We will (1) go back in time to at least the 1920s through an Ann Arbor obstetrician's patient notes; (2) go explicitly transcultural by looking at women's health care among non-white, non-Anglo women in this country and/or to a non-Western region of the world; (3) have one session where we read recent social work and medical case files and discuss them with some of the health professionals who were involved; and (4) consider the new kinds of narratives and case files that will emerge as reproductive technologies continue to move in a high-tech direction.

This course is intended for Ph.D. students in LSA, Nursing, and Public Health, especially those who are enrolled in the Rackham-sponsored seminar on the Body. Upper-level undergraduates may enroll with the permission of Prof. Nancy Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 003 Agriculture and Japanese Society and Political Economy, 1700 to 1930. (1 credit). Course meets 10/25-12/6/99 (Drop/Add deadline=November 5). Meets with Asian Studies 491.001.

Instructor(s): Stephen Vlastos

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


History 592. Topics in Asian History.

Section 001 China and Early East Asia: Han to Tang.

Instructor(s): Charles Holcombe

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/F99/HS592/

This course will explore East Asian history during the period of crisis following the collapse of the Han dynasty in 220. While China was torn apart by war and nomadic invasions, and struggling towards eventual reintegration under the Sui and Tang dynasties (581-907), the first independent native states began to coalesce in Korea and Japan through a process of dynamic interaction with the Chinese model and what we think of as East Asia was born.

Course format: lectures interlaced with discussions of selected short readings. Assigned readings are available on Reserve at the Library.

Grading Criteria: two hour long examinations (30 points each); one 5-10 page original paper (30 points); class participation (10 points).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 593. Topics in U.S. History.

Section 001 Theories of Race/Practices of Difference. Meets with CAAS 558.001.

Instructor(s): John Carson (jscarson@umich.edu), Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This undergraduate/graduate seminar will examine some of the intellectual constructions of the notion of race over the course of the last two centuries and at how those formulations have intersected with practices of marking differences among and between people. Rather than attempting a comprehensive chronological survey, we will instead choose a series of particular moments and investigate how race was understood and acted upon as both an intellectual construct and lived reality. Starting with formulations of difference before the existence of real theories of race, we will examine, among other topics, the development of scientific constructions of race in the nineteenth century and their relations to the practices of slavery and segregation; African-American appropriations of eugenic discourse at the beginning of the twentieth century; racialized discourses around immigration to the United States from Eastern and Central Europe, Latin America, and Asia; medical constructions of race and difference and African-American responses to them; and attempts to delegitimize race as a concept in the post-World War II period and their relations to an emerging politics of identity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

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