Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in History of Art (Division 392)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for History of Art.


History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


Hist. Art 101. Near Eastern and European Art from the Stone Age to the End of the Middle Ages.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mireille Lee

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/101-001.html

This course offers an introduction to major monuments and periods of art from antiquity through the Middle Ages. Its purpose is not only to acquaint students with key works of Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Islamic, Romanesque and Gothic art and architecture, but also to help them develop a vocabulary for the description and analysis of works of art, and to provide them with a basic understanding of the methods and aims of art historical study. Lectures will be supplemented by weekly discussion sections on readings drawn from a general art historical survey and a course pack. Written work will consist of two short papers on objects in the Kelsey Museum and the Museum of Art; there will be a midterm and a final examination. This course, with History of Art 102, is meant to provide a foundation in the history of western art and will be useful to students taking higher level courses in the department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 108/CAAS 108. Introduction to African Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dana Rush

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/108-001.html

This course offers a general introduction to the arts of African cultures south of the Sahara desert. It reviews the history of African art from about 10,000 B.C. through the twentieth century. The survey is based on a carefully selected corpus comprising prehistoric rock paintings and engravings, old and recent sculptures in terracotta, metal, wood, and ivory; and textile and bodily arts. While it adopts an historical approach, it will also explore some prevailing themes in African art, such as African approaches to representation and the social function and meaning of art. Last, it will highlight a number of significant cultural transformations that resulted from contact between African peoples and western societies. Scheduled lectures will be supplemented with written and reading assignments, videofilms, and tours of African art exhibitions in museums and private collections in the Detroit area.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 112/Art and Design 112. History of Photography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew Biro

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/112-001.html

This course will explore the history of photography in the 19th and 20th century through a comparative study of photographs, photographers, and theories about the nature of photography. The goal is to create an understanding of the themes and issues, concepts and contexts associated with photographic image-making from American and international perspectives. One intent is that at the end of the study the student should be aware of some of the diverse concerns in present day photography and be able to identify their origins and influences. The class should interest students from a wide range of disciplines. Class structure combines three hours of lecture sessions a week for general structured presentation of material, with one hour of discussion section that meets weekly for deeper study of the main theories about the nature of photography and its role in shaping our understanding of the world. Assignments will include readings from course texts and completion of some computer-based tasks using special programs developed for use with this program. Grades will be based on participation in discussion sections, three essays, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 113/Art and Design 113. Introduction to the Visual Arts.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael Kapetan (nbva@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: This course is for non-art majors only. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/113-001.html

Visual arts are a part of the human experience in all cultures and all time periods. The ability to appreciate, to understand, and to assess the quality of visual art can enrich a person's life and broaden one's thinking. This course will introduce students having no formal art or art historical background to the major forms of visual expression through human history from the Stone Age to the present. We will examine works of art in various media such as painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, sculpture, architecture, graphics, and industrial design. Students will learn how artists use the language of form to communicate information, to express emotion, and to explore the world of nature and the world of the mind. Students will learn the basic techniques of the various media. Students will learn how the art of a time and place defines and expands the boundaries of that culture. Assigned readings and visits to museums and galleries will help students become critical consumers of the visual culture as they learn to see, appreciate, and assess art forms. Requirements include periodic quizzes, a final exam, and a term paper. Students will also make some ungraded drawings and paintings as analytical tools.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 151. Art:Ideas::East:West.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Walter Spink (wspink@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/151-001.html

In this course, a comparative study is made of eastern and western cultural forms, ideas and values as these are reflected in examples of painting, sculpture, and architecture as well as in poetry, music, and other forms of creative expression. This course also compares western and eastern attitudes toward significant cultural themes such as time, nature, death, God, love, and action.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 001 Art and the City in the Medieval West.

Instructor(s): Robert Maxwell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/194-001.html

The medieval city, with its colorful market squares, decorated churches, and drab domestic spaces, was a magnificent hothouse of artistic and social activity. How were these cities constructed and organized and how did the lords, monks, artists, laborers and lepers all negotiate their social interaction through the built space? Which interpretive models will permit us today to enter into this space?

This course introduces students to major issues in the study of medieval urbanism and to related areas of medieval art. We will examine how specialists define cities, as well as how cities might be "un-defined" or deconstructed. We will look to historical and economic models, but our focus will be on the built environment the architecture of churches, palaces, and fortifications-and on issues of planning and topography. Case studies will be drawn from well-known examples (Paris, London, Florence) and lesser-known examples (new towns, late antique settlements, Carolingian outposts). One of our challenges will be to assess the role of other types of art e.g., sculpture and the minor arts-in the "urbanization" of medieval society. Special topics will include pilgrimage and urbanization; utopian and imaginary cities; relics, rituals and urban processions; ancient and medieval urban theory; the politics of urban art; public order and disorder; the rhetoric of public and private space; and medieval visions of cities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 002 Sex, Politics and Visuality in Chinese Cinema.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/194-002.html

This course introduces and interprets Chinese cinema by focusing on three themes: "the color of sex, violence and revolution (Red Series);" "the symbol of women (Water Series);" and "the dream of a strong China (Modernity Series)." Varying methods of cinematic analysis will be introduced with case studies. The goal is to explore the issues of gender, politics and visuality in Chinese films and society. Requirement: weekly readings, class participation, multiple writing assignments and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 221/Class. Arch. 221. Introduction to Greek Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lauren Talalay (talalay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~classics/ca/221/

See Classical Archaeology 221.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2, 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 230/Amer. Cult. 230. Art and Life in 19th-Century America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Diana Linden

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/230-001.html

This course will examine painting, sculpture, and material culture produced in the United States during the nineteenth century and use isolated examples of 19th-century Canadian and Mexican art as comparison. This century saw the transformation of the United States from a rural to an industrial, urban nation; a Civil War that divided the country, Westward expansion that enlarged it, and waves of immigration and border movements that changed its population; the rise of a middle class, and the emergence of women into public and professional life. While the general outline of the course is chronological, we will not be attempting a complete survey, but will focus instead on certain artists (and media) within the context of broader themes. As a course in social art history, rather than art appreciation, the emphasis will be on developing a critical analysis of how images function within specific moments in time. Through lectures, discussion, and visits to see original works of art, among the topics we will examine are: the West as viewed from the painter's easel, the photographer's lens, and the frontier homestead; the creation of Civil War and other public monuments; the representation of African Americans and Native Americans by Anglo-American artists, versus self-representation; mass-produced images and the dissemination of art for middle-class tastes; and imagery which upheld traditional gender roles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 251/MARC 251. Italian Renaissance Art, II.

Section 001 Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo.

Instructor(s): Erika Naginsky

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/251-001.html

Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo. The course will take a new look at the three most celebrated artists of the Italian Renaissance. It will focus on the relation between their achievements in architecture, sculpture, and painting, and the crisis-ridden historical conditions in which the works were produced it will be shown how artists exploited contemporary circumstances, and drew upon ideas of genius and divine inspiration to ensure their own reputations of universal mastery and originality. Through these figures, Renaissance and modern myths of artistic independence and individuality can be subjected to a critical scrutiny. Lectures will deal with the interpretation of the works themselves, and with the artists' careers, their interactions and rivalries, their relation to patrons and other artists.

Sections will introduce some of the best of the latest scholarship on the High Renaissance, together with writings by the artists and their contemporaries. Some of these texts, which produce each artist as a "universal genius," continue to affect the perception of these artists right down to the present day. Two papers, midterm, final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 271. Origins of Modernism: Nineteenth Century Visual Culture.

Section 001 Visual Culture in the Nineteenth Century: Development of Painting in France.

Instructor(s): Jasmine Alinder

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/271-001.html

This course examines visual culture in the nineteenth century with a focus on the development of painting in France. Art played a formative role in nineteenth-century life and culture and was intimately related to other dramatic transformations of the period in realms such as industry, social theory, science, and colonialism. The course addresses the role of visual culture in the construction of the past, the negotiation of gender, racial and sexual difference and the representation of social class. In addition to painting, we will analyze the invention and uses of photography, the birth of the motion picture, developments in sculpture, and the mass publication of prints. Artists discussed include: Goya, David, Ingres, Gericault, Delacroix, Turner, Daguerre, Daumier, Courbet, Bonheur, Manet, Cassatt, Monet, Rodin, Van Gogh, Seurat, and Cezanne.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

Hist. Art 386(410). Painting and Poetry in China.

Section 001 Meets with Asian Studies 380.001.

Instructor(s): Martin Powers (mpow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/386-001.html

Many Chinese paintings can be "read" as visual poetry. Every image resonates with centuries of poetic writing, where each poem addresses human issues of interest to most of us even today: poverty, childhood, the loss of loved ones, individual against the establishment, family fights, unrequited love, injustice Each of these topics was addressed in both the painting and the poetry of China. Teaching students to understand the human drama underlying such paintings and poems is one major goal of this course. As a pedagogical aid, we will read a fair amount of modern American poetry, especially by authors who refer to or admire the Chinese tradition, including Wendell Berry, Hayden Carruth, and Gary Snyder. At another level, the relationship of pictures to words is a more general art historical problem that occupied some of the finest minds in both Europe and China. The problem continues to generate new and insightful writings by contemporary students of these cultural traditions, and so we will sample some Chinese critical literature on painting and poetry as well as some more contemporary approaches to work/image issues. By the end of the course, students should have a store of analytical methods for relating pictures and poetry generally, but will also understand a good deal about how to read a Chinese painting. There will be a midterm, a final, and two short papers (roughly 7 pages). There is no prerequisite.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 001 Crossing Erotic Boundaries: Representations of Lesbianism in Early Modern Western Art. Meets with Women's Studies 347.001.

Instructor(s): Pat Simons

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/394-001.html

We will examine the varieties of representations of women who desired other women in Western Europe from the 15th-17th centuries. Focusing on England and Italy, with forays into France, Germany, Spain and Holland, we will read early modern texts (poems, drama, opera, mythology, prints, paintings, domestic artifacts, pornography, and medical writing), as well as contemporary theorizing about lesbianism. Charting continuities and discontinuities between early modern conceptions and twentieth century ones, we will investigate the extent to which a coherent history of lesbianism exists.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 003 Baroque Architecture. Meets with Architecture 528.001.

Instructor(s): Lydia Soo (lmsoo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/394-003.html

The course examines the architecture of the Baroque period in the buildings and cities of the late 16th to the mid-18th centuries in Italy, France, England, and Central Europe. They will be discussed in relationship to contemporary theoretical writings, addressing issues of function, structure, and beauty, as well as in relationship to the cultural context of the Baroque period, including philosophical, religious, political, economic, and environmental factors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 004 Displaying Culture: The History and Politics of Museums.

Instructor(s): Jasmine Alinder (jalinder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/394-004.html

This course examines the ways that museums shape visual culture and produce public history. We will begin by looking at the origins of museums in sixteenth-century cabinets of wonders and discuss a contemporary analogue, the Museum of Jurassic Technology in Los Angeles. We will then consider the division of museum into distinct types and the founding of Europe's major art museums during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. A significant portion of the term will be dedicated to the analysis of local museums including the Kelsey, Natural History and Art Museum (on the University campus) and the Henry Ford Museum, the Museum of African American History, the Detroit Institute of Arts, and the Motown Historical Museum (in Detroit). Class topics include: the blockbuster exhibition/"Tutmania"; the museum status of photography; the construction of art history in the Museum of Modern Art; museums as memorials; museums on the Internet; strategies of museum display in the National Museum of American History; and critiques of museums leveled by contemporary artists such as Fred Wilson and the Guerilla Girls.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 005 Ben Shahn: Content and Context.

Instructor(s): Diana Linden

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

*"[Shahn's] Sacco & Vanzetti paintings are technically within the school of modernistic painting, but they posess the necessary qualities, accessiblity, and power, to make them important to the proletariat."
-Diego Rivera, 1932

*"This [Shahn's work] is not important, it is essentially beside the point as ambitious present-day painting is concerned, and much more derivative than it seems at first glance."
Clement Greenberg, 1947

*"Almost more interesting that the Ben Shahn retrospective that is now at the Jewish Museum is the public that comes to see it."
Hilton Kramer, 1976

Three takes on Ben Shahn, his work, his contribution to American art, and his relationship to his audience. We are fortunate (or cursed, if you ask Hilton Kramer) that the Detroit Institute of Arts will be hosting the exhibition Common Man, Mythic Vision: The Paintings of Ben Shahn this fall (until Oct. 31). In this course, we will examine the art, career, reputation and recent reappraisl of Ben Shahn. We will consider Shahn's own writings, primary source documents, recent critical assessments, and the history of Shahn's exhibitions. Using Shahn as a starting point, we will explore social realism, the New Deal mural projects, the representation of white-ethnic and working class identity in art, the FSA photography program, and debates over the viability of realism in the post-war era when abstraction dominated American art. Finally, we will consider why critics and historians are both fascinated with and dismissive of Shahn's appeal and his audience. Working in collaboration with the DIA's Educatio Department, we will create an audience survey to find out more about who is looking at Shahn and why.

This course is open to graduate students. Lecture/discussion format.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 006 History of Architecture. Meets with Architecture 313.001.

Instructor(s): Anatole Senkevitch (senkanat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is the first in the undergraduate two-course sequence (Arch 313/323) surveying the history of architecture from antiquity to the present. The course introduces students to leading developments in the history and theory of architecture and urban design from ancient times through the Renaissance. Innovation and change in architectural conception, stylistic expression, building typology and construction technique are examined. Attention is also paid to the way architecture has historically been shaped by varying combinations of the formal and theoretical intentions of the architect, the preferences and needs of the client and the particular mix of social, economic, cultural and technical factors operating to define the specific characteristics of a given time and place.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 435/Class. Arch. 435. The Art and Archaeology of Asia Minor.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Pedley (jpedley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/435-001.html

See Classical Archaeology 435.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 439/Class. Arch. 439. Greek Vase Painting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/439-001.html

See Classical Archaeology 439.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 468. Sculptural Practices of the 20th Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria Gough (mgough@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/468-001.html

This course will examine the manifold ways in which avant-garde sculptors from c.1900-c.1970 have theorized the relationships between art and technology. Stimulated by the technological optimism of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, many sculptors in Europe and North America sought to close the gap between these two realms, upholding the utopian belief that technnology could rescue sculpture from academicism and that, in turn, this newly generated sculptural sensiblility could help humanize technology itself. With the destruction of the Second World War, however, sculptors became more circumspect about technology's utopian promise, but nevertheless continued to bridge the divide between the two domains through their introductions into sculptural practice of systems aethetics and serial production, their renewed interest in kineticism and the problem of motion in an art form traditionally theorized as static, their increasing pursuit of collaborative projects with engineers, and their appropriation of early video technologies. The course seeks to provide the student with a sense of the philosophical and historical traditions that not only predate the current fascination with the interface of visual culture and electronic media, but also underpin it. Classes will be part-lecture, part-discussion. Course requirements: weekly readings, regular contributions to discussion, short in-class presentations, and two papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 536/Class. Arch. 536. Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elaine Gazda (gazda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 101 or 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/fall99/536-001.html

This course will follow the stylistic and iconographic developments in public and private sculpture from the late 4th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D. The theories underlying the reconstruction of these developments will be examined, and there will be discussions of new approaches to these problems. Lectures will consist mainly of slide presentations, although original sculptures will be examined whenever possible. There will be one midterm and a final examination. A research paper of approximately fifteen pages or a lecture is required for graduate students. Undergraduates may choose between a research paper and TWO short essays as their writing requirement. In general, the instructor emphasizes a critical approach to secondary sources on Hellenistic and Roman sculpture and encourages students to develop skills of analysis, both textual and visual. It is recommended that students have some previous exposure to Greek and Roman civilization. Foreign languages are not required for undergraduates, but it is expected that graduate students will read assignments in German, French, and/or Italian and will use foreign language sources in their research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

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