Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in Lloyd Hall Scholars (Division 445)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for Lloyd Hall Scholars.


Lloyd Hall Scholars 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The personal, political, and philosophical roles of community service and service learning in the university and the world. Students will perform and reflect upon a service activity of their choosing. A strong writing component forms part of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 101. Academic and Professional Development.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

LHSP 101 is intended for first year students and is designed to prepare them for success both at the University and in the professional world. The focus of the course is upon the great variety of resources available at the University of Michigan for academic and professional growth and development, and its aim is to show students how to navigate the multitude of options available to them, and how to use them to best advantage. Examples of available resources include the library system, the Media Union, various advising and counseling services, museums, opportunity for internships and for study abroad, the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program, and the Office of Career Planning and Placement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 114. Literature and the Arts in Society, I.

Section 001 Presenting Yourself for 200 and Beyond: Developing Verbal Power and Killer Graphics.

Instructor(s): Tanya Topolewski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (3). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

At universities today and in any career you choose it's a given: YOU will have to give presentations, whether it be presenting work to teachers, teaching concepts to your classmates or interviewing for a job. This does not neeed to leave you dreading life and shaking in your boots!

Professional presentations are not boring and dull; the best are verbally persuaive and visually striking! This course is designed to make your presentations stand out verbally and graphically by developing

  1. your critical thinking skills through evaluating and presenting writing done by yourself and others
  2. your verbal presentation style to ensure that you present yourself with confidence, and
  3. your graphic skills to clearly convey information and ideas in a visually exciting and professional manner

In this course you will develop your talents in the art of public speaking and the fundamentals of graphic design to ensure that you present yourself, your work, and your ideas in a clear, poished, professional manner.

Get ready this ain't no speech class, baby!!!!!

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course emphasizes argumentative writing and related skills that are needed for success in college work. Various themes are determined by the instructors who come from many different academic backgrounds. This course makes full use of the close living-learning environment of the Lloyd Scholars Program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 001 Beyond O.J. And Nicole: The Realities of Sexual and Domestic Violence.

Instructor(s): Melissa Drewling

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Everyone has his or her opinion about the guilt or innocence of O.J., but how many have thought about the complicated dynamics of domestic violence that led to the brutal murder of Nicole Brown? In this class we will examine the cultural and legal history of domestic and sexual violence and explore how this type of violence affects families, communities and individuals.

We will also explore a variety of issues that many people identify as the sources of sexual and domestic violence like pornography, prostitution, media representations of women, and gender roles of men and women.

Many sexual assaults that happen on college campuses involve acquaintances and go unreported. We will explore questions such as why women are not reporting assaults. We will also look at how other factors, like alcohol, play a role in campus assault and examine some of the myths about sexual assault. For example, is acquaintance rape just a matter of women not being forceful enough when saying no? Assignments will include three short papers and one research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 002 Educational Roads: How I got to College and What I'm Going To Do Now That I'm Here.

Instructor(s): Jocelyn Flint

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

You have arrived! As a first-year college student, you have made it though 12 years of schooling, standardized tests and applications. About to embark on four pivotal years at a university, and at an age where grammar and secondary school experiences are not too distant memories, you are at an ideal position from which to engage in a critical look at the education system through which you have traveled. How were you taught in grammar school? Were your school's educational standards fair to all students? What did your high school English curriculum contain and how useful a curriculum was it? What are your expectations of a college education and can they be realized? All of these questions touch on educational debates of recent public interest.

This course will allow you to trace your educational path, from grammar school to the first year of college, while targeting some of the more critical issues that arise along the way: affirmative action in college admissions, multi-culturalism in the classroom, standardized testing, public funding and government responsibility, tracking and its effectiveness and finally, the academy and its organization. Students will be asked to accompany class readings with reflections on personal experience. We will use these experiences as starting blocks for class discussion, while working to effectively integrate such personal anecdotes into argumentative writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 003 The Sixties: Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll...and Your Parents.

Instructor(s): Joe Gonzalez

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What did your parents do in the Sixties? Did your father serve in Vietnam? Did your mother take birth control pills? Did they experiment with drugs or go to Woodstock? In this course, you the children of the Baby Boomers will explore the world your parents encountered when they were your age: the politics, the war, the popular culture, even the sexual revolution of the Sixties.

In order to explore the Sixties, we will read autobiographies, memoirs and works of history. But we will do more than read; we will also experience. We will watch some of the movies and television of the period and listen to some of its music. We will also experience the Sixties through the eyes of real people, like a Vietnam veteran and a social activist who live here in Ann Arbor and will visit our class.

We will also write. You will write five papers in two drafts, four relatively shorter ones and one longer one. You will also be expected to actively participate in class discussions about the material and the writing of other students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 004 Free Markets, Free Minds: Exploring the Power of Economics.

Instructor(s): Sheila Gudiswitz

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Studying economics should lead one to wonder "Who thought of this?" and "Why is it here...besides to cause me pain?" Our course will give you a glimpse into the minds and times that produced the foundation of modern economics. We will focus on the last 200 years, starting with Adam Smith; you will also have opportunities to explore political economies from hundreds or thousands of years earlier. Conversely, we will touch upon the practical side of modern economics as we learn how it is used by business people, policy analysts, and other professionals. In addition to our primary texts, our readings will be drawn from academic critiques and popular magazine articles.

Although you will learn about the topic of economics, the purpose of this class is to develop your argumentative, college writing skills. To achieve this end, you will write four essays, each with drafts, and some smaller weekly writing exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 005 The Psychopathology of Everyday Life: Writing about Psychology and Culture.

Instructor(s): Jean Leverich (leverich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~leverich/syllabus.htm

What does it mean to be "normal"? How do communities decide who or what is normal? Likewise, what does it mean to be "abnormal" or deviant, and how far from the norm does one need to stray to be labeled deviant by the community? For example, are tattooing and piercing "normal" today? More seriously, what sense can we make of the recent high school shootings and bombings? Are these boys monsters or ordinary teenagers?

This course asks you to hone your writing and critical thinking skills by examining the complicated relationships among individuals, community, conformity and deviance. Although the main focus of this course will be on your own writing, we will also explore a variety of challenging, provocative, discomforting, and otherwise engaging essays, stories and films. Expect to read essays from psychology (like Freud's "Totem and Taboo"., anthropology (Geertz's "Deep Play: Notes on the Balinese Cockfight"., and sociology (Goodman's "Growing Up Absurd".. We'll also read articles from the popular media and view recent films such as "Paris Is Burning" and "Surburbia." Everything we read and discuss in this class is intended to serve as a springboard for you to develop and articulate your own arguments and analyses about the normality/deviance continuum, how individuals fit into communities, how communities define norms, and how communities scapegoat those who seem "different."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 006 From Designer Babies to Jurassic Park: The Future of Genetic Ethics.

Instructor(s): Karine Mauprivez

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Ever see Jurassic Park? Ever wonder if it could happen? If it could happen, would you want it to? All of these questions are valid in the ever-growing world of genetics. With Dolly, the cloned sheep, and the Human Genome Project, the possibilities are endless.

This introductory course in genetic ethics will cover the issues that can be seen in the headlines on a daily basis. We will discuss values, morality and personal stances regarding everything from designer babies and cloning to the rights about privacy for individuals, employers, and whole communities concerning an individual's genetic make-up. Classroom initiatives and current events will prompt discussions for the forum that will be connected to the writing assignments. Four main topics will be covered: scientific advances and uses of genetic research, individual versus community rights of genetic testing, legal proposals (current and future), and theoretical or fantasmic possibilites (e.g., Jurrasic Park and dinosaur revival.)

Coursework will include writing essays and conducting an in-class debate. There will also be required readings. In-class participation will provide discussions from which the essays will be drawn.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 007 Personal Environmental Activism.

Instructor(s): Lani Pascual

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"On the morning of August 16, 1996, Greenpeace divers slipped into Seattle Harbour carrying chains to wrap around the propellers of five U.S. factory trawlers which fish off the northwestern shores of Washington State. While the divers were in place twelve more protesters attatched themselves to a floating boom and formed a human barricade."

In this course we will explore the personal reasons that inspire ordinary people to work on environmental causes from recycling to ecoterrorism. We will also discuss the many definitions of "environmentalism." We begin by reading Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, the book which launched the environmental movement, and end with a class survey project that explores why people do or do not consider themselves environmentalists. Not only will you leave the class with a greater understanding of how you can personally affect your relationship to the environment, but you will also leave with a strong understanding of college writing. We will compose five critical essays on the impact of environmentalism on policy, populations, groups, and individuals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 008 Censorship and Social Reform in American History.

Instructor(s): Alyssa Picard

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Should Howard Stern be allowed to say the words "penis" and "vagina" on the radio? Who is responsible for the Columbine High School massacre, or for the death of Jenny Jones talk show guest Scott Amedure? Was there once a time when decent people didn't flock to media depictions of sex and violence when we didn't discuss sex or personal problems in public?

In this class, we will discuss whether the media should be held responsible for behaviors which may be a result of the information and messages they broadcast. We will explore, among other issues, the ironic possibility that broadcasting talk about social problems like pornography, racism and violent crime might actually make those problems worse.

Our context for exploring these questions will be the history of American censorship in the late 19th and 20th centuries. We will focus our reading, writing, and class discussion on the arguments made for and against censorship by social reformers throughout this period, and we'll explore how censorship has affected American history from the birth control movement of the early twentieth century to today's shock radio and the Internet. Our goal is to contextualize and better understand modern debates about who is allowed to speak in a public forum, and what he or she is allowed to say.

Because this class is also designed to introduce you to the critical analysis and rhetorical principles of college writing, you will compose and revise several substantial essays, and write weekly journal assignments and short in-class exercises. Your final grade will be based on a portfolio of your written work, and on your participation in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 009 Rebellion, Reflection, and Revenge.

Instructor(s): Cecilia Infante

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Sometimes we feel so emotionally explosive about an issue that we find ourselves in the heat of a discussion standing dumb and silent, while our mind privately races to defuse the opponent and defend our beliefs. And for some people, when words don't come and time and tempers are short, the only option is violence. If you've ever wished you could return to a moment in an argument you would have won if only you'd thought of the right counter-point; if you've ever been misunderstood and had no opportunity to explain yourself then you should know how powerful and satisfying the reflection and revenge of writing can be.

This class is for passionate people who want to defend their ideas but have difficulty finding the right words. Like any means of effective communication, it's the ability to forge our own language that translates into the political force of self-definition and self-defense. And writing is most effective when it violates the laws of time and space by continuing to champion our ideas long after we're gone.

We will study a vast range of celebrated writers who use writing as a means of rebellion, reflection, and revenge. We'll also explore historical and contemporary uses of the essay to challenge status quo thinking. In addition, we'll look at how the essay currently functions as a political surrogate for physical violence and vengeance. Finally, we'll explore how an extended form of the essay the memoir has the power to expose the lies of the past to justify the truth of the present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 001 Merging with Michelangelo: Introduction to Painting, Drawing, and Thinking About Art.

Instructor(s): Annie O'Kane

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What's more important: individualism and self-expression, or working in a rich tradition? Are great artists self-made, or do they build upon their predecessors? Certainly Michelangelo studied Cimabue and Giotto; and Monet surely studied all three. But none was held captive by the past; each did something new. Most artists are indebted to those who preceded them, but not slavishly so; predecessors serve best as sturdy partners in an ongoing dialogue that helps to inform one's present creative vision.

This course provides you with two things: studio experience in drawing and painting, and an opportunity to explore the concepts and language of art criticism. Not only will you become familiar with the tools and techniques of painting, you will also explore your thoughts and feelings about art in a series of informal writing assignments designed to bolster your knowledge and authority on the subject of art.

LHSP encourages all of you to develop your artisitc talents, especially if you're not in the School of Art. Because studio art classes at the University are restricted to art majors, we offer you professionally-taught classes, taught in the Alice Lloyd art room. This class is open to all LHSP students in all colleges, and requires no previous training or experience in art.

All students are responsible for providing their own art supplies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 150. Focused Studies.

Section 001 Life and Death Decisions: First Aid Training for Common Student Emergencies. Meets Sept. 22-Nov. 10 (Drop/Add deadline=October 6).

Instructor(s): Natalie DeNooyer, Sarah Smith

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of four credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Your friend is passed out, lying in a pool of vomit. What do you do?

Your roommate suddenly begins choking at dinner. What do you do?

This class will prepare you to deal calmly with those emergency situations that punctuate college life. This is not a pre-med class; instead, this is a class where you will learn to how to handle situations that you might encounter on a Thursday night in the dorm, or at your own house, or in the dining hall. You will also learn how to perform CPR and rescue-breathing on adults and infants. (Don't get too excited, we use dummies!!) We will cover a lot of emergencies and have tons of fun acting them out. And for passing the class, you will get official certification cards from the Red Cross.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 150. Focused Studies.

Section 002 Street Art and Mural Painting: Destroying the Barriers and Preconceptions around Making Art. Meets September 15-November 3 (Drop/Add deadline=September 28).

Instructor(s): Brian Tubbs

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of four credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The primary objective of this class is to overcome inhibitions with creative energy. Everyone is an artist. Our first exploration using charcoal will create the ability to express yourself, build your confidence and motivation, while learning some technical skills in the process. Then we will focus on the investigation of street art and public art, discovering what it is, why it is, and how we can participate. This is a simple class including some research into topics you find interesting, like graffiti, performance art, and carnivals. You will also experiment with materials, like paint, found objects, and costumes.

The purpose of this class is not to create a materpiece, but to develop the mental skills required to produce work that is uniquely your own. Here, you can break open the lock to your imagination, and learn to trust creative intuition. We will then be using these skills to design a mural as a final project. Two field trips and two short papers will be required, in addition to creating big messes (so wear painter's clothes.) $10 lab fee.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 001 In Your Face: A Class About Comedy. Meets Sept. 20-Nov. 8 (Drop/Add deadline=September 28).

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Steiger

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Incidentally, in this class you will explore comedy as it relates to own your life, both as a student, and as a human being. We will discuss the meaning of comedy in different cultures and contexts, by looking at plays, art, and videos. We will examine art and videos of comedians such as Lenny Bruce, Chris Rock, and Andrew Dice Clay to help define what is funny, crude, or honest or all three. We will also explore techniques for overcoming stage fright; so if you have trouble being youself in front of an audience, this class is the answer. Ultimately, you will use humor to tell your own truth, by performing stand-up, or in scenes, in a small showcase that presents your own idea of what is funny. Everybody's a comedian.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 002 Real Eyes: Photo-Outlook On Your Life. Meets Sept. 21-Nov 9 (Drop/Add deadline=September 28).

Instructor(s): Lisa Powers (lspowers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this black and white photography course, we will explore the basic concepts and techniques of capturing our unique perspective of the world on film. You will increase the control you have over your art by developing your film and printing your photographs from your negatives. You will discuss your final photos in formal critique sessions and attempt to incorporate your classmates' suggestions for improvement.

Experience in photography is helpful but not required for this class. Although we will emphasize artistic expression over technical mastery, knowledge of darkroom usage is preferable.

REQUIREMENTS:

  1. You must provide your own 35mm camera, preferably a SLR. Point-and-shoots are NOT acceptable. Flash is optional. If you have any questions about what camera is acceptable, please call #734-668-4044 or send me email at lspowers@umich.edu
  2. Lab fee of $30 (includes three rolls of film, paper, chemicals, and supplies.)
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 003 Jewelry Making and Metal Working. Meets Sept. 20-Nov. 8 (Drop/Add deadline=September 28).

Instructor(s): Annie O'Kane

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Have you ever wanted to design your own necklace? Or give a good friend a ring you made especially for her or him? Or sculpt an object in metal? In this class, you will learn the basics of metal working by designing and constructing your own pieces of jewelry or metal objects. You will receive instruction in designing, forming, joining, and stone setting using copper, brass, nickel, silver, and semi-precious stones. All students are responsible for providing their own art supplies.

LHSP encourages all students to develop artistic talents, especially if you're not in the School of Art. Because studio art classes at the University are restricted to art majors, we offer you professionally taught courses, held in your own art room in Alice Lloyd Hall. Our studio art classes are open to all students and require absolutely no previous training or experience in art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 200. Advanced Leadership and Service Learning.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. No credit granted to those who have completed LHSP 100. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

LHSP 200 is intended for second year students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program; students who have taken LHSP 100 may not enroll in this course. The focus of the course is the student's engagement with, and assessment of, community service in any one of a variety of forms. Engagement will require that a student identify and serve with a community service agency for a sufficient period of time to gain an insight into the strengths and weaknesses of the particular activity. Assessment will require group discussion and a series of written essays that evaluate both the individual experience of service and the variety of political and philosophical arguments offered both for and against such service.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 201. Advanced Academic and Professional Development.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. Required of all second-year students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. No credit granted to those who have completed LHSP 101. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses upon personal and professional growth, using a guided series of workshops and seminars, in tandem with individual research, to explore the richness of University resources in the fields of academic and professional development and preparation. There is a writing component.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 229/English 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott Kassner (skassner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the introductory composition requirement. (4). (HU). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~skassner/Eng229.html

See English 229.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Lloyd Hall Scholars 299(200). Independent Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Lloyd Hall Scholars Independent study.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

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