Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in Political Science (Division 450)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for Political Science.


Poli. Sci. 101. Introduction to Political Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Wingrove (ewingrov@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to some classic accounts of politics in the Western tradition, and to some critiques thereof. Readings include: Plato, Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Arendt, and King. Among the themes to be addressed: What, if anything, makes state authority legitimate? Do people benefit from political participation, or is it inevitably corrupting, confusing, irritating, and/or tiresome? What constitutes a public, rather than a private, concern?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 111. Introduction to American Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a broad survey of government and politics in the United States which explores a wide range of topics including elections, interest groups, the presidency, Congress, and the courts. The kinds of questions considered might include the following: What impact do interest groups have on governmental policy? Are there real differences between the two major political parties? What accounts for swings in voting behavior and election outcome from one time to another? How do members of Congress decide how to vote? In what ways do presidents and bureaucrats affect public policies? This is not a comprehensive list but suggests the kinds of issues that are discussed in this course. There are two lectures and two discussion section meetings each week. There is generally a midterm, a final examination, and some other written work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 140. Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines how democracy evolves and functions in different settings around the world. We start with the emergence of democracy in Western Europe, examining the factors that give rise to it and help it survive. We then examine the origins of fascism in Germany and Japan; and the rise of communism in Russia and China, attempting to understand why these alternatives to democracy flourished in those settings and why they later collapsed. This leads to an analysis of the current struggle between reformers and hardliners over the move to market economies and liberal democracy in Russia, China, and Eastern Europe, and an assessment of the prospects for democracy in Mexico and Nigeria. Finally, we examine the probable evolution of democracy in advanced industrial societies. In addition to two lectures, there are two meetings a week in relatively small discussion sections, designed to encourage active discussion of these topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 160. Introduction to World Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Douglas Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and ideas that are used in social science efforts to understand politics in an international setting. As such, it stresses theory and inference and uses historical anecdote and contemporary events only as illustrations to illuminate behavior in larger classes of events. The course begins with consideration of who the actors in world politics are, and what the international system they interact within looks like. We then turn our attention to influences on those actors arising from a variety of levels of social aggregation (e.g., the overall international system, the characteristics of states, domestic politics, and idiosyncratic factors). After that we will focus on the military, economic, and diplomatic tools with which the actors can express themselves, and end the class with detailed consideration of the prospects for collaboration and cooperation in world politics. There will be one midterm examination, one 8 to 10 page writing assignment, a final exam, and such additional assignments as may be made by individual section leaders.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1, 4

Poli. Sci. 300. Contemporary Political Issues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gmarkus/syllabus.html

This course will help you think about the relationships between yourself and politics in the United States. Learn about: (1) important social, economic, and political issues of the day, including how an issue becomes "important". (2) the political values and attitudes of the American public; (3) the conduct of political campaigns and elections. Confront these subjects from the perspectives of "What is..." and also "What ought to be...." Given our goals, scholarly readings are intermixed with articles about current issues, and our discussions often move freely from assigned readings to the latest news. Although intended primarily for non-political science concentrators, this is a serious course for serious students. The readings are extensive, and occasionally difficult. You will be expected to: stay current and master what you have read, attend lectures faithfully, participate in sections actively, and engage in additional learning activities outside of the classroom. You will write papers, and you will be examined carefully and regularly (two midterms plus a final). Recommended: at least one prior political science course. Grades are based on a no-curve system.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 312. Freedom of Speech and Press.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lee Bollinger

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the constitutional right of freedom of speech and press in the United States. Various areas of law are examined in depth, including extremist or seditious speech, obscenity, libel, fighting words, the public forum doctrine, and public access to the mass media. Classes are conducted according to the law school model, with readings focused on actual judicial decisions and students expected to participate in discussions.

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Poli. Sci. 390. Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science."

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission of the chair.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course allows students to gain experience working on the journal under the direction of the chair or other appropriate faculty member. This experience involves editing the Michigan Journal of Political Science. In addition to taking part in working on the year's issue, students wishing credit for working on the journal would do readings and write book reviews and research notes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: Please note; THIS COURSE IS FOR MJPS EDITORS ONLY. For information on how to become an Associate Editor, please email mjps.editors@umich.edu or inquire in the Poli Sci office.

Poli. Sci. 395/REES 395/Hist. 332/Slavic 395/Soc. 392. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephanie Platz (splatz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 395.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 400. Development of Political Thought: To Modern Period.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arlene Saxonhouse (awsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing or two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is two-fold: (1) to give the student a sense of the history of political philosophy from the ancient Greek period to the end of the sixteenth century; and (2) to help the student become aware of the complexities and assumptions entailed in the articulation of a coherent political theory. We will be reading the works of such major political philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Thomas Aquinas, and Machiavelli. We will be concerned with such issues as the relation between nature and convention, the sources of legitimacy, the role of the individual in the political community and the value and purpose of political life. Readings will be from primary sources. Class meetings will include both lectures and discussions. Course requirements will include two exams during the term and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 402. Selected Topics in Political Theory.

Section 001 Democratic Theory and Deliberation.

Instructor(s): Claudia Ritter (ritterc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 101 or 400 or 401. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is intended as an introduction to political theory through readings of current approaches to democratic theory. Concepts of democracy are challenged by political changes like the ongoing globalization, the transition to democracy in former state socialist countries, and by new shapes of socio-cultural standardization and heterogeneity, while everything turns out to be political. Moreover, the terms in which the preconditions of a democratic decision making process are discussed got questioned in recent debates in political theory. Communitarian, republican, and liberal thoughts criticize and redefinein different ways the role of political institutions and civil self-regulation. These thoughts can be interpreted as a part of the modern discourse, while the postmodern discourse opposes the rationality of deliberation the modern heart of democratic culture with a claim for difference and aesthetic politics. The main work for the course will be an oral midterm and a written final exam. Students will also have several short written assignments. Regular attendance, reading of the texts, and participation in the discussion are requested.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 409. Twentieth Century Political Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dennis McEnnerney (dennismc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 101 or 401. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dennismc/F99-PS409.htm

A survey of political thought in the 20th century, focusing on the controversies and tensions that characterize recent philosophy and politics. Topics to be discussed include those of cultural relativism and universalistic humanism; realist analysis and normative inquiry; and communitarianism, individualistic liberalism, and group-oriented multiculturalism. Readings will likely consist of selections by Max Weber, Albert Camus, Joseph Schumpeter, Hannah Arendt, John Rawls, Frantz Fanon, Jean-François Lyotard, Iris Marion Young, and Charles Taylor. Written assignments will include some mix of papers and exams, though the exact character of that mix will depend upon what is feasible given final course enrollments. Course meetings will consist of a mixture of lecture and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 411. American Political Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Howard (meghow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Be prepared for Campaign 2000: Take Political Science 411, American Political Processes. We'll study U.S. campaigns and elections, public opinion, political parties, interest groups and the mass media. We'll discuss how race, gender, education, and class affect our politics. Part of the required reading will be The New York Times and The Washington Post, so we may compare political science theories to current events.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 412. Courts, Politics and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Noga Morag-Levine (noga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Courts, what they share with and what distinguishes them from other political institutions, are at the center of this course. The term will be divided into four sections. Part I will examine the structures, practices, and organizing principles of central actors and institutions within the judicial process (court structure, judicial selection, juries, and the legal profession). Part II will follow the evolution of primary legal theories regarding the impact of political constraints and choices upon judicial reasoning. Particular emphasis will be put on the relationship between political controversies and attendant legal theoretical debates during the New Deal and Warren Court era. Part III will provide an introduction to interdisciplinary studies of courts and society and will draw upon contributions from Political Science, Anthropology, Sociology, Economics, and Literature. Finally, Part IV will incorporate diverse methodological and disciplinary perspectives in the context of two important contemporary legal theoretical debates. The first pertains to the relationship between state law and alternative mechanisms of dispute resolution. The second concerns the viability of law as an instrument of social and political change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

Poli. Sci. 413. American Constitutional Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Brandon (mbrandon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 111, 410, or 411. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Prerequisites: Some background in American history, American institutional politics, or political theory is desirable. This is a course in political science and political theory concerned with law. The course focuses on one of the most vital aspects of politics: interpreting and applying the nation's fundamental principles. It addresses: (1) the role of language in grounding the legitimacy of the political order; (2) the ways (if any) in which that language is translated into reality; and (3) how those translations are justified. In connection with those general themes, we shall focus on three additional questions: (1) WHAT is the (or a) Constitution; (2) WHO are to be its authoritative interpreters; and (3) HOW are those interpreters to go about the business of interpreting? We shall take up topics such as judicial review, interdepartmental relations, federalism, the power to wage war, and constitutional crisis. Assignments will include participation in a Moot Court.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 415. The American Chief Executive.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin Laracey (mlaracey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 111, 410, or 411; or junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the office of the American Presidency, both in terms of its historical development and its current characteristics. The course begins with the foundations of the office, and then moves on to the processes by which presidents get elected, organize their administrations, manage the executive branch, and pursue their domestic and foreign agendas. The second half of the course considers how administrations manage the executive branch and pursue their domestic and foreign agendas. The second half of the course considers how presidents function in a complicated system of shared political power and intense public interest, focusing on interactions between the presidency and Congress, the courts, interest groups, the media, and the American public.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 420/Comm. 484. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nick Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Communication Studies 484.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 421. American State Government.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barry Rabe (brabe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore state, local, and regional politics, as well as intergovernmental relations across all levels of American government. It will provide historical overviews of each of these areas, apply a variety of political science perspectives to them, and consider some of the most pressing current questions in subnational politics. It will also include a comparative focus, examining the differences in politics and policymaking between federal and non-federal systems, and will place special emphasis on health care and environmental policy. This course will be intended for undergraduates with some prior coursework in political science and American government. It will encourage students to conduct research in subnational politics, culminating in a research paper. In addition, students will complete an essay-style examination, as well as one or two brief papers focused on discussion-related topics. Readings will include selections from the traditional political science literature on state and local politics and intergovernmental relations, but will also include a variety of areas not commonly associated with or applied to subnational politics, including regulatory theory and game theory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 423. Politics of the Metropolis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gmarkus/ps423f99.html

This course will examine local politics in America, with a particular emphasis on urban issues and civic engagement around those issues, such as suburbanization, urban sprawl, the shifting character of economic and racial conflicts in American cities, and the interrelationships among these and other issues. As part of the course, students will engage and study these issues both in and out of the classroom.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 428/Asian Studies 428/Phil. 428/Soc. 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 001 Politics & Development in China.

Instructor(s): Joffe

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is built around the theme of China's search for a development model that addresses its basic problems and fits the predilections of its leaders. This search began with the establishment of the communist regime in 1949 and continues to this day. The course traces its evolution and the convulsive changes which it has generated. Although the approach is chronological, the narrative is interlaced with an analysis of these changes, the reasons behind them and their implications. Requirement: exam at the end of the course

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 431. Public Administration.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laracey

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the world of public organizations in the American governmental system from three fundamental yet sometimes conflicting perspectives: management, politics, and law. The focus is on how public organizations function, the various societal interests they serve, and how they can be managed effectively. Guest speakers and actual case studies add a "real life" component to the course, so that public administration can be understood from the dual vantage points of theory and practice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 456. Government and Politics of Japan.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Campbell (jccamp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 140, 440, or 450. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Japan is an ever-more interesting country to study, due to both its obvious importance, and the fact that it is the only post-industrial non-western country. This course offers an overview of contemporary Japanese politics, designed for students with a general interest in Japan as well as political science concentrators. Special attention is given to how politics has affected, and has been affected by, cultural patterns, social organization, economic growth, and Japan's position in the world. Grading will be by examination and short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 459/CAAS 449. African Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Widner (jwidner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent study of the Third World; Pol. Sci. 465 is recommended but not required. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the institutions, processes, and ideas that shape political life in Africa. The first part of the course provides some historical background and considers the effects of environment on political structure, the differences between segmentary societies and kingships, and the effects of international contact on the character of the state. The second part explores some of the bold initiatives of independence leaders and their consequences. The third part explores contemporary struggles for democracy and the management of elections. A final segment of the course addresses several important policy issues, including war-peace transitions and government effectiveness.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 460. Problems in World Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul Huth (phuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice with permission of the instructor.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/F99/PS460/

This course will address a range of issues which confront state leaders as they seek to ensure their country's military security and economic development in a competitive international system. Special attention will be given to foreign policy problems confronting the U.S. in the post-Cold War era. The course will be conducted largely as a lecture with some opportunity for discussion. Students will be graded on the basis of three in-class exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 463. International Organization and Integration.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Harold Jacobson (hkj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 160. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Documents.center/ps463.html

This course deals with ways of managing issues arising from increasing interdependence among nation-states. It examines the role of international organizations in the contemporary global political system. It considers the historical development of international organizations, their political processes, and their activities. It explores the consequences of the growth of international organizations for the global political system, particularly the extent to which international integration is being achieved. Primary attention is devoted to international governmental organizations such as the agencies of the United Nations system and the European Union, but international non-governmental organizations are also considered. Responsibilities of students taking the course for credit include: (1) studying the assigned readings and participation in class discussions; (2) writing four papers of no more than 2,500 words in length; (3) writing a midterm examination; and (4) writing a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 or 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 483. American Political Parties and Electoral Problems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Howard

Prerequisites & Distribution: Poli. Sci. 111, 140, 410, or 411. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Documents.center/campfin.html

In this course we seek a broad understanding of what the American political parties are, how they operate and how they evolved, and how they compare to parties in other countries. We will study them mainly in the context of presidential and congressional elections, although we will also consider local parties, party organization, and parties in legislatures. There will be two exams (short answer and essay), and one short paper. Students will be expected to read assigned books and articles and be prepared to discuss the material. Lecture and discussion will be the format.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher Achen (achen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://polisci.lsa.umich.edu/courses/PS486/

This course will cover the history of the American party system, with a special emphasis on the state of Michigan. Beginning with the pre-Civil War period, the readings and lectures will treat the shifts in public opinion that give rise to new popular movements and pressure groups, which then modify or destroy the contemporary party system. The course will be taught with a research emphasis. Several computer-based assignments will introduce students to the historical study of electoral politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 001 Environmental Politics and Policy. (3 credits). Meets with SNRE 480.

Instructor(s): Barry Rabe

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Environmental Politics and Policy (SNRE 480, Pol Sci 489) is an advanced course offering on environmental politics and the environmental policymaking process. The course will draw heavily on theoretical perspectives from the discipline of political science in examining the processes of environmental policy formation and implementation. It will examine enduring impediments to successful policy but will also emphasize factors contributing to successful initiatives. In particular, it will examine the political viability of alternative approaches to environmental policy, including pollution prevention and regulatory integration across medium (air, land, and water) and jurisdictional (state and regional) boundaries. Case applications will be drawn from a wide range of environmental issues, including air and water pollution, hazardous and radioactive waste, pesticides, and greenhouse gases.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 491. Directed Studies.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term with a supervising faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3: Permission of department

Poli. Sci. 493. Senior Honors Proseminar.

Instructor(s): John Campbell (jccamp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to senior Honors concentrators. (4). (Excl). No more than four Honors credits may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Documents.center/psjr/slide1.htm

This is a seminar for seniors who are working on Honors theses. Students must be admitted to the Honors program before enrolling.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5 students must be admitted to the Honors program before registering

Poli. Sci. 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 001 Decision-Making In Organizational Settings.

Instructor(s): Martha Feldman (msfeldma@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course presents and explores theories of organizational decision-making and various features of the context in which decision-making takes place. We start by considering the rational theory of decision-making and then several alternatives to this theory. We then consider the perception of risk (as influenced by individual cognition, cultural and structural features of the decision-making context), the effects of national and/or ethnic culture and organizational culture on decision-making and the effects of hierarchical and groups relations on information exchange and, ultimately on decision-making. At intervals throughout the course we discuss how the theories we are discussing play out in an actual situation. The Challenger Launch Decision by Diane Vaughan gives us a basis for such exploration. Excerpts from the book provide information about the case so that we can discuss the relationship between the theories we are learning and what happened in that case.

Assignments include reading several articles or book chapters per week, writing five short (500 1000 words) papers, one longer (2000-3000 words) paper and giving 1 oral presentation based on the longer paper. Activities in the course include discussion (readings and short discussion papers written by students will provide basis for discussion), one video-tape and two in-class exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 002 Issues in Higher Education.

Instructor(s): Edie Goldenberg (edieg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will focus on selected topics of great concern to the U.S. higher education community today, such as public attitudes toward universities, sources of funding for higher education, athletics student athletes or pre-professionals in training, affirmative action in admissions and hiring, information technology and the virtual university. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussion, write a series of short papers and one term paper, and make an oral presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 001 Ethnicity and Politics in the Former Soviet Union.

Instructor(s): Zvi Gitelman (zvigitel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is designed for those with some background in Soviet or East European politics. It examines the nationalities of the former USSR, policies which affect them, the ideology which informs those policies, and the reactions of the nationalities to state policies. We examine the historical and ideological development of Soviet nationality policy and then analyze several aspects of ethnopolitics: language and personnel policies, resource allocation, ethnicity and religion, ethnic relations, and demography. The seminar concludes with an examination of the current crisis in post-Soviet ethnopolitics. The course emphasizes reading and the writing of papers, including a major research paper. There are no examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 002 Understanding Political Developments in India.

Instructor(s): Pradeep Chhibber

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/F99/PS497/index.html

This seminar, which focuses mostly on the domestic politics of India, has multiple aims. In addition to providing an overview of political developments in India since independence, the seminar assesses the various perspectives used to understand Indian politics. It will also attempt to develop and alternative way of approaching the study of Indian politics by stressing the role played by political parties in political developments in India and examine the limits of such an approach.

The seminar will begin with a discussion of some the characteristic features of Indian politics such as how does one build a polity in an extremely diverse nation with multiple cross-cutting cleavages? Why is that democracy and collective violence seem to accompany each other in India? The next segment will focus on the formal institutional structure of the Indian state that was developed in the decade following independence-the role of the state in economic development; the creation of linguistic states; federalism; the bureaucracy and the judiciary. This institutional framework will be used to develop a framework for understanding party politics in particular the organization and subsequent decline of the Congress party and the electoral success of the BJP. This background in party politics will be used to address contemprary issues such as the rise of fundamentalism, separatism, and ethnic conflict. After examining the politics of social policy and economic reform the course will conclude with a brief discussion of the nuclearization of India.

While the readings have India as their sole focus, seminar participants are encouraged to think comparatively. A comparative focus can allow us to better understand the nature of Indian politics as well as assess the validity of various theories develope to understand Indian politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

Section 001 The Global System.

Instructor(s): J. David Singer (jdsinger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The objectives of this course are to provide the advanced undergraduate student with (a) an understanding of global, demographic, social, technological, economic, and political trends; (b) alternative interpretations of policies to deal with these trends; (c) methods by which these interpretations can be compared and tested against the empirical evidence; and (d) the ability to evaluate past policy decisions and propose future ones. We are also interested in our ability to express orally and on paper the concepts, hypotheses, realtionships, and methods used in pursuit of the substantial objectives; as a famous grammarian put it, "if you don't write, good, you don't think good!" It all goes together: careful conceptualization, close reasoning, procedural clarity, and effective communication. Course requirements include three papers and class participation. We will use two or three texts and read independently in the scholarly journals. There will be three written assignments and no final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 529/Public Policy 529. Statistics.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior coursework in calculus or concurrent enrollment in Math 413, and permission of instructor. Previous coursework in statistics is not required. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Public Policy Studies 529.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 585/Public Policy 585. Political Environment of Policy Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Hall (rlhall@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Public Policy Studies 585.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 585/Public Policy 585. Political Environment of Policy Analysis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ann Lin (annlin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Public Policy Studies 585.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Poli. Sci. 591. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course. The form is available in 7609 or 7621 Haven Hall.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 591. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Section 003 Internship Seminar. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Helen Graves (hmgraves@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

University of Michigan Political Science department invites junior and senior political science students to apply for placements with legislators (Democratic/Republican in Lansing), Michigan Senators and Representatives; the Michigan Executive, the Courts, the Bureaucracy; interest groups; legal profession; private sector (governmental affairs offices of the major auto companies); international (Ontario Provincial Legislature, Canadian Consulate); and the Media. Three hours of political science credit (involves 16 hours per week in placement, five seminar sessions with Director, journal assignment, and interview). What do I get out of the Political Internship program? (1) Preview a career in the political world. (2) Visible, unique work experience for your résumé. (Job interviewers always take note of Political Internships.) (3) A letter of recommendation for Law/Graduate School or job. (4) Networking and leadership training experience. Personal interview is required, contact Helen M. Graves, Ph.D., 5629 Haven Hall, (734) 647-7995 (office) or call (734) 994-5563 (home). E-mail: hmgraves@umich.edu. First come, first serve basis.

Prof.Graves will be interviewing for Fall 1999 internship opportunities beginning this Friday, March 19th. Placements are available with legislators, senators, representatives, courts, interest groups, and govenmental offices. You MUST BE a Polical Science concentrator to participate and you may earn three hours of credit toward degree which requires sixteen hours per week in placement. An application (available at 5629 Haven Hall) and a 3-5 page writing sample should be turned in at the interview. Interviews times are:

Friday, March 19, 11:00-2:00 pm
Monday, March 22, 11:30-2:00 pm & 3:00-6:00 pm
Tuesday, March 23, 11:00-2:00 pm
Wednesday, March 24, 3-5:00 pm
Thursday, March 25, 4-6:00 pm
Friday, March 26, 11:00-1:00 pm

Call 647-7995 or email hmgraves@umich.edu to set up an appt.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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