Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in Russian (Division 466)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for Russian.


Russian 101. First-Year Russian.

Language

Section 001, 002, 003 Students must also register for one grammar section (004 or 005).

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103 or 111. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course the student is introduced to the basics of Russian pronunciation and grammar. The course begins with an intensive study of the Russian sound system and orthographic rules (the alphabet and correct spelling). Students spend an average of 1.5-2 hours per day working with tapes and writing exercises. The class is supplemented by video shows. Students who intend to concentrate in Russian Language and Literature or in Russian and East European Studies might consider taking the intensive class, Russian 103. Textbook: Nachalo I. Must also register for required grammar section 004 or 005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Russian 101. First-Year Russian.

Language

Section 004, 005 Required grammar lecture. Must also register for REC section (001, 002 or 003).

Instructor(s): Herbert Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103 or 111. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is the required grammar section for Russian 101 (You must also register for REC section 001, 002 or 003). Please see description for REC sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Russian 102. First-Year Russian, Continued.

Language

Prerequisites & Distribution: Russian 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103, 111, or 112. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, the sequel to Russian 101, students complete their survey of Russian grammar, expand their vocabulary, and learn to express themselves in Russian about topics of interest including Russian history and culture. The class is supplemented by video shows. Students are expected to complete 1-2 hours of oral and written homework every night.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Russian 103/RC Core 193. Intensive First-Year Russian.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Baliasnikova

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, 111, or 112. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course covers in one term what is ordinarily covered in two terms of Russian 101 and 102. The course carries eight credit hours and is designed for highly motivated students who wish to acquire rapid mastery of Russian. It is especially recommended for students intending to choose a concentration in Russian Language and Literature or Russian and East European Studies. Students are expected to complete approximately 16-20 hours of homework per week, including 3-4 hours in the language laboratory. Students are also required to participate in four hours of core-curricular activities outside of the classroom per week (daily Russian lunch table; weekly Russian tea).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

Russian 201. Second-Year Russian.

Language

Prerequisites & Distribution: Russian 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 203. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course reviews and expands grammatical concepts first covered during the First-Year Russian (101 and 102) courses, focusing on verbal aspect, declension, and the verbs of placement. The course also emphasizes speaking and listening skills. Students are expected to complete 9-12 hours of homework per week. Textbook: V Puti by Frank Miller and Olga Kagan and workbook; cost is $73.00 and covers two terms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Russian 301. Third-Year Russian.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Khan

Prerequisites & Distribution: Russian 202, and satisfactory scores on a proficiency test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 303. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Third-Year Russian starts with the assumption that the basic aspects of the language have been assimilated, and therefore emphasizes practical skills reading, writing, and speaking. Difficult grammatical points are reviewed, vocabulary is greatly enlarged, idiomatic constructions are studied. It is a recitation course, and students are asked to participate in class discussion and give oral reports. Students are evaluated on the basis of their oral and written skills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Russian 351. Introduction to Russian Literature.

Literature

Section 001 Taught in Russian.

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Russian 202. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to Russian prose. Classes, readings, and writing assignments are in Russian. There are journals, essays, and in-class examinations. Class discussion is encouraged. The course increases vocabulary, reading speed, written and oral fluency, while developing literary-analytical skills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Russian 355. Supervised Reading of Russian Literature.

Literature

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students develop a term-long reading and writing project on a topic or topics in Russian literary or linguistic studies, in consultation with a member of the faculty. Readings may include substantial amounts of Russian. Weekly meetings with the supervisor may be conducted in English or Russian. Writing assignments made according to the number of credits elected, but must correspond to writing expectations of upper-level department courses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Russian 401. Fourth-Year Russian.

Language

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Baliasnikova

Prerequisites & Distribution: Russian 302. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 403. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Russian 401 is offered during the Fall Term and Russian 402 is offered during the Winter Term of every academic year. Prerequisites: three years of Russian (minimum). Classwork, homework, and labwork include: grammar and word formation; reading and listening (films and TV news included); discussions; oral reports and compositions. Bi-weekly grammar tests and final oral presentation. Textbook: Let's Talk About Life! by Emily Tall and Valentina Vlasikova; cost is $42.00 and covers two terms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Russian 413. Business Russian.

Language

Section 001 Taught in Russian.

Instructor(s): Vitalij Shevoroshkin (vvs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Russian 302. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is planned for advanced Russian students (3rd year and above) who are oriented toward economics or business. In particular this would target seniors seeking experience in international business and graduate students in the Center for Russian and East European Studies Master's Degree program (or in various departments, who either wish to pursue employment opportunities in business or government or who wish to get a Ph.D. in economics, political science, or history). The course will focus upon the vocabulary and locations of commercial Russian, both oral and written. Students will be expected to learn format and jargon for various types of business communication. No final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Russian 451/RC Hums. 451. Survey of Russian Literature.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Khan

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on the masterpieces of Russian fiction written between 1820 and 1870, including such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. Evolving fast from Romanticism to High Realism, this period marks a blossoming of Russian culture, despite strained relations with political authorities. We will trace how writers treated the political, social, intellectual and religious issues dividing their contemporaries, creating a unique kind of literature that claimed authority over society in settling these problems. Topics include romantic self-fashioning and posturing (including such risky aristocratic games as dueling and gambling), gender relations, the fate of the educated in society, violence and repentance, reform and stagnation, history and the private self, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. Participation in class discussion, two short papers, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Russian 462. Dostoevsky.

Literature

Section 001 Meets with Russian 856.001.

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A detailed examination of the literary career and major fiction of Fedor Dostoevsky. His novels and short stories, including Poor Folk, The Double, Notes from the Underground, Crime and Punishment, The Devils, and The Brothers Karamazov are read and analyzed. His contribution to literary and literary-political discussions of the time is assessed. Two papers, two examinations. Lectures, with discussion encouraged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Russian 480. Popular Sub-Genres in Modern Russian Literature.

Literature

Section 001 Satire: A Town and Its Dwellers As Depicted by Russian Satirists. A knowledge of Russian is required. Meets With Russian 861.001.

Instructor(s): Boris Katz (bkats@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course offers multifaceted elucidation of satire as an important part of Russian literature. Different aspects of the genre will be presented: its history, poetics, dependence on and influence upon Russian social, political, and psychological contexts. Emphasis will be placed on the images of Russian towns and its dwellers as reflected in the mirror of satirical works both in prose and poetry. The representatives of various urban social strata, ranging from the highest authorities and bureaucracy to the lowest classes, their interrelations, patterns of behavior, their moral values, their public and private life, ways of thinking and speaking served as favorite targets for sarcastic, farcical, burlesque, or ironical attacks of many writers who ridiculed the social and political life whether in the Russian Empire or in the Soviet Russia. Novels, stories or poems by Gogol, Saltykov-Shchedrin, Nekrasov, Chekhov in the 19th century, and Bulgakov, Platonov, Zoshchenko, Ilf and Petrov in the 20th century being united by the topics mentioned above provide an excellent material for deep understanding of Russian history, society, and national psychology on the one hand, and that of literary satirical means expressed in Russian language on the other. These problems will be discussed during the seminar meetings. This course will be taught in English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Russian 482. Ten Masterpieces of Russian Literature.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Boris Katz (bkats@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (2). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Is it true, as one Russian undergraduate has stated, that the only difference between a novel and a short story is the fact that love in the latter is shorter than in the former? Is it true that love in Russian literature is strongly marked by certain particular features of national characteristics? Is it true, finally, that Russian writers during the 1820s and 30s developed a special way of composing love stories?

Such questions make clear that the proposed course will elucidate its subject in, at least, three aspects:

  1. in the context of the poetics of a short story as a specific literary genre;
  2. in comparing the presentation of love in Russian prose to what love was really like for Russian people of different ages, and social and cultural backgrounds in different periods of Russian History;
  3. in discovering those literary traditions which help (or, perhaps, do not) Russian writers to create around their literary love stories a specific atmosphere which proved so attractive both to Russian and Western readers.

An infinite variety of happy/unhappy lovers, multiform stages and nuances of male/female falling in love, the difference between the positions of men and women in love and marriage, attitudes of different generations toward love, conflicts and rivalry in love triangles of many kinds as well as manifold emotions and situations provoked by love (from admiration to hatred, from awesome self-denying to fatal jealousy, from struggling with sexual temptations to plunging in reckless love adventures, etc.) all this and more will be discussed as the life material for highly individual (serious or ironic) versions of sentimental, classical, romantic, realistic or pre(post)modernist short stories composed by famous Russian storytellers such as Karamzin, Pushkin, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Chekov, Bunin, and Nabokov. The stress will be made on how Russian writers turned real love stories into literary ones.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Russian 491. Senior Honors Course.

Literature

Prerequisites & Distribution: Approval of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of Russian 491 and 492.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The first half of the two-term Honors course. Honors students, working in consultation with the Honors advisor and a thesis supervisor conduct research on an area of literary or linguistic studies. By the end of 491 the students should have a detailed bibliography and a prospectus for a thesis. Regular meetings with the advisor are expected. Studies continue with 492.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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