Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in University Courses (Division 495)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for University Courses.


University Courses are sponsored by the College or University rather than by individual departments or programs and may be taught by members of the faculty in any academic unit on the Ann Arbor campus. The College offers as University Courses both full-term courses and mini-courses.

The University Courses Division sponsors a number of First-Year Seminars (UC 150, 151, 152, 153) that provide a unique small-class educational experience open to all first-year students. (A complete list of seminars offered this term by the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts can be found in the first section of this Course Guide.) These seminars are taught on a variety of topics by regular and emeritus faculty from many different departments. The small-class size (approximately 18-20 students) facilitates deeper learning through more active participation and increased opportunities for interaction between student and teacher as well as dialogue among students. First-Year Seminars provide a stimulating introduction to the intellectual life of the University by exposing new students to engaging subject matter; some may discover a subject to pursue in further courses. It is hoped that students who take a seminar will find in it a sense of intellectual and social community that will ease the transition to a large university.

All First-Year Seminars can be used to complete part of the College's general requirements. UC 153 meets the Introductory Composition requirement. Other seminars count toward satisfying the Area Distribution requirements: Humanities (UC 150); Social Sciences (UC 151); Natural Sciences (UC 152), Quantitative Reasoning or Race & Ethnicity.

The University Courses Division occasionally offers Collegiate Seminars, open to any student who has completed the Introductory Composition requirement. Intended especially for lower-division students and taught by regular professorial faculty members, Collegiate Seminars provide additional opportunities for first- and second-year students to personalize their education through a small-group course.

All Collegiate Seminars count toward satisfaction of the College's Area Distribution requirements in one of the three major divisions: Humanities (UC 250); Social Sciences (UC 251); Natural Sciences (UC 252). All emphasize critical thinking about important and central topics and feature further instruction in writing.

University mini-courses are one-credit, special interest offerings that center upon a conference, group of lectures, or special exhibit, appear on short notice in a term, and are usually of 2-to-8-weeks duration. Mini-courses are offered mandatory credit/no credit and are normally excluded from area distribution and concentration credits. Information about upcoming UC mini-courses is available by dialing POINT 10 (764-6810). No more than two University mini-courses may be elected in one term.


UCourses 102. The Student in the University.

Section Restricted to participants in the Michigan Community Scholars Program.

Instructor(s): Pasque, David Schoem

Prerequisites & Distribution: Michigan Community Scholars Program participant. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide students with an opportunity to critically review their role in the university. It will allow students to consider the expectations of their experience at the university within a framework of theoretical perspectives. It is hoped that students will develop a broad understanding of what their university experience can include and how they can shape it to realize their academic potential and intellectual development. The course will focus on the transition from high school to college, role of the liberal arts, critical thinking, intergroup relations and social change. The issues and challenges of living and working in a multicultural society will be examined. This discussion will include a focus on student perceptions, relevant research and university resources. The small discussion groups will focus on the readings and areas of practical concern. This course is open only to participants in the Michigan Community Scholars Program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 104. Introduction to Research.

Section 001 Restricted to Participants in UROP in-Residence Program.

Instructor(s): Sandra Gregerman (sgreger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participant in UROP-in-Residence Program. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide students with an overview of important topics related to research. This course is designed to help students: (1) understand the history of the research university; (2) explore different questions and modes of inquiry researchers use in different academic disciplines; (3) learn about ethical issues in research including the responsible conduct of research, the use of animals in research, data ownership and interpretation; (4) explore issues of creativity, risk-taking, and critical thinking in research; (5) discover the importance of multiculturalism in research across academic disciplines and some of the controversy of braking new ground; and (6) develop a student's research skills through workshops. Researchers will visit the class and share their perspectives on research, their educational and professional pathways, and research interests, and related topics. Librarians will conduct workshops for the class on advanced library searchers, Internet exploration, and research as a process. Students will be asked to: (1) keep a research journal to include both reflections on their own research projects and reactions to assigned readings; (2) read an article on one of the proposed topics and write a critical review; and (3) give a 15-minute presentation on their own research project. Evaluation will be based on class attendance and participation in and completion of all tasks including a research journal, article review, and presentation about their research. A course pack of reading related to the topics listed above will serve as the required text for the course. Lecture and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 110/AOSS 171/Biol. 110/Geol. 171/NR&E 110. Introduction to Global Change I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Timothy Killeen (tkilleen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.sprl.umich.edu/GCL/

Have you ever considered the future consequences of current stresses being put on Earth's environment by humankind's consumption and pollution patterns? Are you interested in discussing critical issues relating to the role of international business, resource economics, human development, and the individual person's responsibility in global change? Funded by grants from NASA and The National Science Foundation, Introduction to Global Change I is an interdisciplinary team-taught introduction to the evolution of the physical Earth and the evolution of life and the human species on our planet. You'll gain state-of-the-art knowledge from some of America's foremost scholars in space physics, biology, geology and Earth ecology. The Web-based course curriculum provides unparalleled opportunities to conduct on-line Internet research. You will even create your own home-page. The interactive laboratory exercises provide you the opportunity to use computers to examine how natural systems function as well as develop projections of the future consequences of the stresses being put on the environment. You will use multi-media tools for graphing and computer researching. And, perhaps most important of all, you will have ample time for discussion of the critical issues in human development and how they relate to the international business community, society as a whole and the individual in global change. All topics are developed in a manner that students will find both accessible and enjoyable. The course grade is based on two midterm exams, a final exam, completion of laboratory modules, and a course poster project based on some aspect of global change. There are no prerequisites for the course and no science background is assumed. The course is appropriate for all undergraduate students, irrespective of intended concentration.

You will learn about...

The Universe:

  • Big Bang Theory
  • Birth and Death of Stars
  • Radiation Laws
  • Origin of the Elements

Our Planetary System:

  • Primitive Atmospheres
  • The Age of the Earth
  • Continental Drift
  • Chemical & Biological Evolution
  • The Building Blocks for Life

Earth's Atmospheric & Oceanic Evolution:

  • Life Processes and Earth Systems
  • The Great Ice Ages
  • Atmospheric Circulation
  • Climate and Paleoclimate
  • Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming
  • Sea Level Changes
  • El Niño

The Tree of Life:

  • Emergence of Complex Life
  • Extinction and Radiation
  • The Five Kingdoms
  • Natural Selection
  • Respiration and Photosynthesis
  • Ecosystems

Projected Ecological Consequences:

  • Elevated Carbon Dioxide Levels
  • Environmental Pollutants
  • Ozone Depletion
  • Likelihood of Global Climatic Change

You will discuss...

  • The Role of the Individual as a Citizen of the Planet
  • Case Studies of Regional and Global Change Issues
  • The Historical Context for Current and Projected Global Change

You will create...

  • Models of Interacting Systems that Give Insight into the Collision Between Natural and Societal Processes

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 001 Fictional World of Ernest Hemingway.

Instructor(s): Edward Shafter

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"All stories, if continued long enough, end in death, and he is no true storyteller who would keep that from you." This stark observation by Ernest Hemingway pinpoints his basic pessimism regarding the human condition. For him, the harsh realities of that condition are violence, suffering, absurdity, disorder and, finally, death. Nevertheless, despite its tragic nature, life still can often be a delight love and friends are especially rewarding. You will enter this compelling Hemingway world through the reading of short stories plus such longer works as, The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, and For Whom the Bell Tolls. Since this course is discussion and not lecture, your active oral participation at each meeting is a non-negotiable expectation. There will be in-class impromptu writing as well as several outside papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 002 What is Man Saint Or Sinner?.

Instructor(s): Edward Shafter (eshafter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The English novelist Somerset Maugham once observed, "He who thinks he knows what a man is capable of is a fool." Through the engaging world of imaginative literature you will be introduced to a range of vivid personalities who behave in ways not only admirable and reassuring but also revolting and perplexing. You will be drawn emotionally to the quiet eloquence of Elie Wiesel's account of his agonizing experiences as a young boy in the Nazi concentration camps of World War II. You will be fascinated by Conrad's Kurtz who discovers the horrifying truth of man's "heart of darkness." Too, you will meet Fitzgerald's Jay Gatsby whose unwavering confidence that he can recapture a past romance produces unexpected and violent consequences. Finally, you will be shocked and confused by the seeming bizarre behavior of Meursault (The Stranger) who is doomed to execution because he failed to cry at his mother's funeral. Since the course format is discussion rather than lecture, you are expected to prepare assignments carefully so that you can contribute orally at each class session. Study questions are distributed for each work; they will help guide and focus both the individual reading and the class discussion. At the start of any class hour you may be asked to write a one-paragraph response to one of the questions for the reading for that day.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 003 The Arts Alive: An Introduction to The Arts in Ann Arbor.

Instructor(s): Susan Nisbett (snisbett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"The Arts Alive" is an introduction to art, architecture, and the performing arts in Ann Arbor for first-year students. Given the tools for appreciating the arts, students feel empowered to hold opinions about the arts and entitled to access. They no longer find going to a play, a dance concert, or an art exhibit scary because they no longer feel ignorant of what to look for. By making this a first-year class, the University can give students four years and then a lifetime of arts access. Through class discussion, attendance at performances, tours, visits with artists and critics, and post-performance debriefings, students sharpen their eyes, ears, and critical acumen as they think and write about the arts. As students prepare for each event of the term they read relevant critical works and discuss what to look and listen for. Then, through essays on what they have seen and heard, students put these critical principles to work themselves, as they ponder the issues aesthetic, ethical, economic affecting artist and audience. Through refining and revising these essays, students hone the writing and composition skills important to all intellectual endeavors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 005 Hopes and Fears of the Modern Self.

Instructor(s): Paul Sunstein (sunstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will examine the modern self, in its ideal, as a self-determined, compassionate, and self-aware individual who has thrown off the shackles of comforting myths. Yet there also exists a shadowy version, the self as a member of a "lonely crowd," self-involved, disenchanted, devoid of grand passion. We will consider this figure in its pronounced contrast to Christianity and Greek antiquity, the two most significant traditions that helped shape it.

The course begins by examination of the Christian background through selections from St. Augustine's Confessions. We then consider a few short classic statements of the modern aspiration in thinkers who first conceived it, Machiavelli, Bacon, Hobbes and Kant. These thinkers conceived of their thought as a kind of secularized Christianity. Next comes Rousseau's anti-Augustinian Confessions, designed to provide a more honest and liberating self-knowledge. We will see how Rousseau constructs the paradigmatic life history of the creative and dynamic "modern individual."

Flaubert's Madame Bovary and Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground display the turmoil of the modern self in an era in which Nietzsche proclaimed "God is dead." We then read a few classic statements of the "crisis of modernity" in Marx, Nietzsche and T.S. Eliot. Finally, we turn to Aristotle's Ethics to examine the Greek alternative and debate the merits of Aristotle's understanding of the healthy individual and the sources of misery against its modern counterparts.

This course is designed to teach students how to read closely and patiently, both critically and appreciatively. Paper topics are formulated with this goal in mind. Writing skills are emphasized. The goal is to produce two short gems. Students are expected to read and assimilate some lessons from The Elements of Style. Students are also required to meet with the instructor to discuss their written work. Course requirements include two papers, midterm and final exams, and the occasional quiz.

The course aims to promote self-reflection through examining the tensions between the above mentioned works and our contemporary self-understanding. Students will be encouraged to continue our discussions by meeting together outside of class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 006 Inventing Race.

Instructor(s): Vanessa Agnew (vagnew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

R&E First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar deals with the emerging concept of race in late 18th- and early 19th-century Europe. Focusing on the work of key Enlightenment thinkers (Linne, Buffon, Kant, and Montesquieu) as well as the contribution made by travel writers and ethnographers, the seminar examines the way in which race was invented as a means of categorizing people. Study of the material highlights the tension between Enlightenment universalism and relativism and brings out the shifting criteria for the constitution of racial difference. The seminar examines the process whereby racial topologies were naturalized within the context of early anthropological, biological and medical discourses, and traces some of the social and political implications thereof. In confronting the issue of the social and historical constructedness of race, the seminar concludes with a brief examination of contemporary thinking about race (including texts by Appiah, Goldberg, hooks, Fanon and Wright) and examines issues concerning the politicization of racial difference such as multiculturalism, identity politics, and xenophobia.

The seminar emphasizes student participation. Students will be encouraged to discuss the material and relate the readings to their own experiences. In addition to assigned readings, the seminar will include the use of visual media (discussion of films, paintings and museum exhibits) and a cultural program (music and dance). Assessment will take the form of oral presentations, class participation, written responses to assigned readings and a longer essay. The instructor will be available to consult with students about their work and about the seminar in general.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 007, 008 Understanding the Dramatic Script.

Instructor(s): William Weinberg (weinbrg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will examine the dramatic structure of the script. Focusing primarily on the screenplay, we will investigate a variety of important subjects, including: the presentation of a message through dramatic means; the arc of traditional narrative; the construction of character; and the representation of inner life through external dialogue. We also will explore the broader implications of such a study both for a more complex understanding of politics and psychology, and for a better awareness of the structure of other forms of writing. This is a demanding but lively course: students are expected to participate actively in discussion and work in groups outside of class hours. As a final project, students will write their own scripts that incorporate the lessons of this course. Students must be available Monday and Wednesday 6:30-8:30 pm for total of approximately 10 required film screenings throughout term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 002 Public Education for Blacks and Other Minorities: An Historic Perspective.

Instructor(s): Warren Palmer (palmerwg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of the seminar will be to trace the development of elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education of Blacks and other minorities in the South from the Emancipation Proclamation to May 17, 1954. Particular emphasis will be focused on watershed judicial litigation, from the Supreme Court decision of Plessy vs. Ferguson, from which the doctrine of "separate but equal" evolved, to the historic Brown vs. Topeka, Kansas Board of Education in 1954 and beyond. Of special importance will be seminar discussions revealing how Blacks and other minorities were successful in achieving an education in spite of the barriers confronting them. Students will be expected to read a number of the classic writings by authors such as W.E.B. DuBois, E. Franklin Frazier, Booker T. Washington, and John Hope Franklin. The writings of contemporary Blacks and minorities will be explored as well as books such as Gunnar Myrdal's An American Dilemma. Students will be expected to prepare readings, participate in seminar discussions, and develop a research topic preferably centered around one of the Southern states under investigation in the seminar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 003 Identity, Alienation, and Freedom.

Instructor(s): Robert Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this seminar will be to explore the concepts of identity, alienation, and freedom as psychological and philosophical concepts. However, the orientation will be specific and applied to the normal situations and predicaments that college students experience. Questions to be considered: surviving as an individual in a large and often impersonal university; living up to and/or dealing with the expectations of parents and teachers; questioning authority in the context of the classroom; trading-off career pressures and personal goals in setting educational priorities. Of special importance will be the examination of the sometimes frightening loss of a sense of identity that often accompanies significant alterations in life style, such as that experienced by students in the transition from high school to college, or later, in the transition from college to the "real world." In addition to regular class meetings each student will meet individually with the instructor every third week to develop and discuss individual reading and writing. Grades will be determined by the quantity and quality of this reading and writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 005 Poetry in the City.

Instructor(s): Murray Jackson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will study city life and explore how literature reflects the rhythm of cities. Our reading, discussions, and guest speakers will focus on historical views of cities in general and on specific writings about the troubles and promise of contemporary cities. Students will read literature that reflects attitudes and values about cities and examine how different authors have expressed conflicting views. We will analyze specific poetry, novels, plays and critiques set in or about Detroit, with the possibility of field trips into Detroit. Certainly Detroit's proximity to Ann Arbor and the University of Michigan makes it doubly important from the course's perspective. Students will be expected to keep a log of their readings and to spend time in individual discussion with the professor. Grades will be based on one shorter paper, one final paper, an essay, and a take-home exam at midterm; class participation is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 006 Public Policy and Science.

Instructor(s): Martin Gold (mgold@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/F99/UC151/

This seminar aims to help you become a better consumer of scientific research so that you will become a better informed citizen and, if you have the opportunity, a more effective maker and implementer of public policy in the future. The seminar will consider the general nature of science, public problems, and public policy, and their relationships. Questions will be raised about the reliability and validity of scientific findings, their relevance to public problems, and their implications for personal and societal values. Together with a sub-group of your classmates, you will formulate public policy on specific problems of interest to you, after consulting the literature and local experts. The seminar will hear and discuss presentations by the instructor, guests, and students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 007 The Psychiatric Patient.

Instructor(s): Robert McCullum (smithrob@umich.edu), Andrew Aldridge (amaldrid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The focus of this course will be a patient-oriented presentation of psychiatric illness in a discussion/small group format. Real patient interviews, as well as other forms of media such as video, art, music, poetry and literature, will be utilized as starting points for discussion of psychiatric and mental health issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 010 War, Nationalism, and Development in 20th Century Asia.

Instructor(s): Rhoads Murphey

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey the rise of nationalism in India, China, Southeast Asia, Japan, and Korea, from the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-95 to the ordeal in Vietnam. The course material also includes: the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05; the First and Second World Wars; the Chinese Revolution of 1911; the warlord years in China; the independence movement in India; the rise of the military in Japan; the triumph of Communism in China; independence and partition in India; and the Korean War. Most readings will be contained in a course pack, and class sessions will focus on discussion of the readings. Four short essays take the place of exams. Student presentations are encouraged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 011 Medicine and the Media from Hippocrates Through ER.

Instructor(s): Raymond Hobbs (rhobbs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will study the development of medicine as a science and how its perception has changed through the media. Students will explore their own beliefs about medicine through literature such as The Citadel, Intern and The House of God, and movies and television series such as The Hospital, Marcus Welby M.D., Saint Elsewhere, and ER. Much of the course will focus on the discussion of ethical issues and the crystallization of the students' own beliefs about medicine in the 20th century.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 012 Injury, Alcohol, Drugs: A Modern Epidemic.

Instructor(s): Ronald Maio (ronmaio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The use of alcohol and drugs is frequently associated with injury, and injury is a leading cause of death in our society, responsible for more years of productive life lost than cancer and heart disease. We will study how society has addressed the problem of alcohol, drugs, and injury through a broad-based approach that includes the medical, behavioral, social, and engineering sciences. The primary goal of this seminar is to demonstrate to students the complexity of a significant modern-day health problem and the broad approach needed to address it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 013 Science and the Practice of Dentistry in the 21st Century.

Instructor(s): Peter Polverini (neovas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students will examine the development of dentistry from its origins to its present status as a scientifically-driven health care discipline. Students will critically evaluate how science has influenced the development of dentistry as a discipline for the past century and explore how emerging scientific disciplines are likely to change the practice of dentistry in the next millennium.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 190. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language.

Section 001 History of German Cinema. Language Across the Curriculum Section. Students must enroll concurrently in German 172.001.

Instructor(s): Johannes von Moltke (moltke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce any student interested in German Studies, Film Studies, or Cultural Studies to the wealth of German cinematic culture. Based on weekly screenings, we will explore the most important stylistic developments of the German Cinema within their respective cultural, social, and historical contexts. In addition, students will have the opportunity to discuss current trends in German media, the connections between the American and German film industries, and the question of what constitutes a national popular culture. The course focuses on the discussion of individual clips, as well as of selected readings in German film criticism and theory. With the aid of research tips supplied by the instructor, students are asked to find German language reviews of selected films in the library, to be presented in class. Thus, in addition to acquiring basic research skills in German film, they also gain an insight into the workings of German film criticism its language, its publishing venues, and its general assumptions about the medium. Readings and discussions emphasize the acquisition of a basic film analytical vocabulary. Taught in German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 210. Perspectives on Careers in Medicine and Health Care.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frances Zorn (franzorn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is for students considering a career in the health profession. It is designed to help them acquire perspectives to facilitate their decision-making process. Health care professionals visit the class and share their educational and professional experiences. Students become acquainted with the prerequisites for professional and graduate schools and spend time with dental, medical, osteopathic, nursing, and public health students. We consider problems facing the health professions in the 90s: problems of health care delivery; the high cost of medicine and its effect on the uninsured and underinsured. We discuss issues relating to malpractice and death and dying. Students are expected to respond in writing and in class to visitors, to reading materials, and to films. Two course packs serve as the required texts. All students are responsible for taking definite steps toward the development of their own goals through a self-inventory of their values, skills, and interests, and through a term paper exploring a possible career direction. Evaluation is based on class attendance and participation in and completion of all assignments. Interested students must contact the instructor at CSP, 1017 Angell, and receive an override. The class meets on-campus Monday 3-5 and on Thursday 7-9:30 p.m. at 2130 Dorset Rd., about a mile from campus. A map showing the location of will be available at CSP. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the first Thursday evening session, when rides will be arranged for the remainder of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 280. Undergraduate Research-A (Grade).

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sandra Gregerman (sgreger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First or second year standing, and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). A maximum of eight credits of UC 280 and 281 may be counted toward graduation.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 490. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language.

Section 001 Latin America: The Colonial Period.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Language Across the Curriculum section. Students must be enrolled concurrently in History 476.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 490. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language.

Section 002 Literature and Social History, Brazil: 1850-1920.

Instructor(s): Sidney Chalhoub

Prerequisites & Distribution: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Language Across the Curriculum section. Students must be enrolled concurrently in History (390) 478.001, Portuguese (452) 474.001, or Latin American & Caribbean Studies (415) 455.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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