Fall '99 Course Guide

Courses in Music Theory (Division 696)

Fall Term, 1999 (September 8 December 22, 1999)

Take me to the Fall Term '99 Time Schedule for Music Theory.


It is possible for LS&A students to elect a concentration program in music, and this program is described in the LS&A Bulletin. In addition, music courses are frequently elected by LS&A students not concentrating in Music. Courses in Music History/Musicology, Composition, and Music Theory are elected for LS&A credit. Some of these courses can be used in an area distribution plan. LS&A students may elect music PERFORMANCE courses for degree credit, but this credit counts toward the maximum twelve non-LS&A credit hours that can be applied toward an AB/BS degree or twenty non-LS&A credit hours that can be applied toward a BGS degree. Courses in Music History/Musicology, Composition, Music Theory, and Performing Arts Technology are listed in the Time Schedule under the School of Music.

The following courses count as LS&A courses for LS&A degree credit.


Mus. Theory 137. Introduction to the Theory of Music.

Instructor(s): Nadine Hubbs (nhubbs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: While this course requires no previous formal training in music theory, it is essential that students have a basic understanding of musical notation. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course covers basics of music theory and musical notation: scales, keys, intervals, triads, clefs, meter, rhythm, and some basic harmony. The course objectives are development of fluency in reading and writing musical notation, improvement of the musical ear, and the provision of a foundation for music analysis skills. Ideally students should have some basic music reading ability, but students without it can catch up with some extra effort. The course is a prerequisite to Music Theory 238, Introduction to Music Analysis. There are two lectures and one lab per week, devoted to aural skills development. Student evaluation is by assignments and exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Mus. Theory 139. Basic Musicianship: Aural Skills I.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Music Theory 129 or placement by Theory Evaluation Survey Test. Limited to students enrolled in the School of Music unless admission is granted by the Chairman of the Department of Music Theory. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Sight-singing, vocal chord arpeggiation, keyboard and dictation exercises, major and minor keys including diatonic sequences, most frequent patterns of modulation and special techniques associated with 5-3 and 6-3 chords.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Mus. Theory 140. Basic Musicianship: Aural Skills II.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Music Theory 139. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A continuation of Music Theory 139.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Mus. Theory 149. Basic Musicianship: Writing Skills I.

Instructor(s): James Dapogny (jdapogny@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Music Theory 129 or placement by Theory Evaluation Survey Test. Limited to students enrolled in the School of Music unless admission is granted by the Chairman of the Department of Music Theory. (2). (Excl).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Review of rudiments; introduction to harmony and voice-leading involving triads, seventh chords, figured bass and procedures for four-voice writing; writing activities with diatonic harmony including cadential 6-4, analyses of harmony, phase-structure, texture and elements of configuration in shorter pieces.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Mus. Theory 239. Basic Musicianship: Aural Skills III.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Music Theory 140 and 150, and concurrent enrollment in Music Theory 249. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Deals with chords to areas other then V; modulation to wider ranges of keys, harmony involving mixture, tonicization in major and minor and Neapolitan and augmented sixth chords.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Mus. Theory 239. Basic Musicianship: Aural Skills III.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Edward Sarath (sarahara@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Music Theory 140 and 150, and concurrent enrollment in Music Theory 249. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Deals with chords to areas other then V; modulation to wider ranges of keys, harmony involving mixture, tonicization in major and minor and Neapolitan and augmented sixth chords.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Mus. Theory 406. Special Courses.

Section 001 Tonal Harmony as an Expressive Resource.

Instructor(s): Marion Guck (mguck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Music Theory 240. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tonal harmony often tends to be associated with Roman numeral analysis and with musical structure or syntax. However, choices of chords, harmonic rhythm, and the order in which chord follows chord are important to the expressive effect of musical works. Schumann's decisions about harmony in, for example, Dichterliebe sometimes help to suggest that the singer is deluded, and Brahms chooses particular chords, or indirect, odd progressions, in order to create atmospheres. We will explore the ways in which harmony is expressive beginning with song literature and moving to instrumental pieces. Work will center on listening and analysis that is designed to help in understanding harmony's role in relation to song text and expressive purpose.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Mus. Theory 430. Analysis of Twentieth-Century Music.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Amdrew Mead (amead@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Music Theory 351. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Primary emphasis is on the development of analytical and aural skills in significant 20th-century music using varied repertoire, varied aural and analytical approaches.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Mus. Theory 473. Eighteenth Century Counterpoint.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kevin Korsyn (kkorsyn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Music Theory 240 and Music Theory 351. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Involves analysis and practice of the craft of counterpoint based upon 18th-C. repertoire of Western music and scholarly treatises of both that period and the present. A diet of species counterpoint is emphasized in the first half, then varieties of contrapuntal craft of the difficulty of two- and three-part inventions of J.S. Bach.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Mus. Theory 473. Eighteenth Century Counterpoint.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ellwood Derr (ellwoodz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Music Theory 240 and Music Theory 351. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Involves analysis and practice of the craft of counterpoint based upon 18th-C. repertoire of Western music and scholarly treatises of both that period and the present. A diet of species counterpoint is emphasized in the first half, then varieties of contrapuntal craft of the difficulty of two- and three-part inventions of J.S. Bach.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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