College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in American Culture (Division 315)

This page was created at 7:47 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in American Culture

Wolverine Access Subject listing for AMCULT

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for American Culture.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in American Culture this week go to What's New This Week.


Amer. Cult. 421/Soc. 423. Social Stratification.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lee Schlesinger (schlesin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/soc/423/001.nsf

See Sociology 423.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 422. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001 Permission of American Culture Director is Required.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 323 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is aimed at giving students with conversational ability in Ojibwa the opportunity to both improve their speaking and listening skills and to introduce them to Ojibwa literature, and the various dialects represented in the literature. Students will work with the original, unedited texts, as well as with edited, re-transcribed materials, and thus learn about the problems of working in a language without a standard widely accepted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Amer. Cult. 423. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001 Permission of American Culture Director is Required.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 422 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 422.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 The Gilded Age. (4 Credits). Meets with History 397.005

Instructor(s): Maria Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4).Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 397.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 Uncle Tom's Cabin in 19th-Century America. (4 Credits). Meets with History 397.002.

Instructor(s): Oz Frankel (ofrankel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4).Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 397.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 003 The Harlem Renaissance. (4 credits). Meets with History 396.001.

Instructor(s): Paul Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4).Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 396.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 004 Capialism, Industrialization, and Community Formation in Antebellum New England. (3 credits). Meets with History 593.002 and American Culture 601.001.

Instructor(s): Weil

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4).Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 593.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 005 American Indians and Film. (3 credits). Meets with History 393.003.

Instructor(s): Liza Black (lizab@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4).Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course looks at American Indian characters in film throughout the twentieth century, including documentary, recreations of war, interracial romance, comedy, cartoons, and some television. We will critically examine the contradictory representations of Indians in non-Indian and Indian vehicles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 North & South American Literature. Meets with English 473.001. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): James Mcintosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4).May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 473.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 599. Methods in American Culture.

Section 001 An Investigation into the Methodologies of American Studies.

Instructor(s): Kristin Hass

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate Standing in American Culture. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A required first-year bibliography course for graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Amer. Cult. 601. Topics in American Studies.

Section 001 Capialism, Industrialization, and Community Formation in Antebellum New England. (3 Credits). Meets with American Culture 496.004 and History 593.002.

Instructor(s): Weil

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate Standing. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 593.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 686/Hist. 686. Studies in American Cultural History.

Section 001 The American West

Instructor(s): Maria Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 686.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 697. Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Limited to American Culture Graduate students.

Instructor(s): Alan Wald

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing; upperclassmen with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is designed to prepare entering graduate students to engage the most up-to-date and sophisticated issues in American Studies research methodology and theory. Using mid-20th century urban culture as our locus, we will explore specific developments in mass culture, film, theater, journalism, visual arts, music, labor history, literature, community life, and so forth, from the perspective of racial formation, feminist theory, masculinity studies, hegemony and resistance, habits and force field, and other contemporary perspectives. Two of the cutting-edge, interdisciplinary texts we will explore and analyze are Michael Denning's The Cultural Front: The Laboring of American Culture in the Twentieth Century, which attempts to articulate cultural developments on a national scale, and Bill Mullen's Popular Fronts: Chicago and African-American Cultural Politics, 1935-1946, which focuses on a particular city (its community arts center, Black newspapers, anti-racist struggles). Since the national convention of the American Studies Association will be held in Detroit in October, members of the seminar will be encouraged to attend, and there will be discussion and analysis of the event.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Amer. Cult. 699. Periods in American Culture: Literary.

Section 001 Local Fictions, National Literature, Global Designs: Regional Writing in the U. S. Meets with English 653.002.

Instructor(s): June Howard

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 653.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 699. Periods in American Culture: Literary.

Section 002 Chicano Literature. Meets with English 653.001.

Instructor(s): John Gonzalez (jmgonzal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 653.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 699. Periods in American Culture: Literary.

Section 003 Calling Myself Home: Contemporary Native American Women Writers and Popular Pan-Tribal Culture. Meets with WS 698.003

Instructor(s): Betty Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In popular pan-tribal culture, patriarchy is often represented as a myth of empire, whereas matriarchy is claimed as the truth of native nations. This "feminization" of Native America attempts to reconfigure tribal cultural histories around a gendered spiritual core. In this course we will examine the ways in which "woman" has enabled the creation and articulation of contemporary pan-tribal culture and identity. In addition to readings on "traditional" gender and native women's status and power within tribal cultures, we will read the works largely responsible for the circulation of "woman" in pan-tribal culture: Leslie Marmon Silko, Louise Erdrich, Susan Powers, and Linda Hogan. Course requirements include a 15-20 page final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 699. Periods in American Culture: Literary.

Section 004 Exploding the Melting Pot: Immigrant Narratives in the 20th century

Instructor(s): Magdalena Zaborowska

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will meet once a week for a three-hour session to discuss the "politics and poetics" of and historic and theoretical discourses on immigrant narrative in twentieth-century American culture. Beginning with the period spanning the late1890s and the 1930's, we will progress through texts that represent various aspects of the experience and process of uprooting, (im)migration, passage, arrival, and acculturation. Some of the issues and themes we will consider include: the impact of the social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality on newcomer stories, the interaction and "contact zones" between the dominant culture and the immigrant from 1900 to the present, popular representations of what Werner Sollors terms the "invention of ethnicity" in film and the visual arts, the reasons for and ideologies behind the systemic exclusion of women and people of color from the American narrative of national consensus that Mary Dearborn traces to the myth of Pocahontas and Toni Morrison to the construction of the "Africanist persona" in early American culture. Primary texts will include excerpts and entire books from among the following: Abraham Cahan, The Rise of David Levinsky (1917), Mary Antin, The Promised Land (1912), select stories by Anzia Yezierska and her autobiography, Red Ribbon on a White Horse (1950), Vladimir Nabokov, Pnin (1957), Audre Lorde, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name (1982), Eva Hoffman, Lost in Translation: A Life in a New Language (1989), Bharati Mukherjee, Jasmine (1989), Maxine Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood among Ghosts (1976), Richard Rodriquez, Days of Obligation: An Argument with My Mexican Father (1993), and Gish Jen's Mona in the Promised Land (1996). Theoretical sources will include texts that will help us to trace the development of academic discourse on immigrant narrative, from early nativist propaganda, through Oscar Handlin's The Uprooted: The Epic Story of the Great Migrations that Made the American People (1951), Sam B. Girgus' The New Covenant: Jewish Writers and the American Idea (1984), Werner Sollor's Beyond Ethnicity: Consent and Descent in American Culture (1986) and The Invention of Ethnicity (1989), to Meena Alexander's The Shock of Arrival: Reflections on Postcolonial Experience (1996), Rosi Braidotti's Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory (1993), and Susan Stanford Friedman's Mappings: Feminism and the Cultural Geographies of Encounter (1998). We will discuss fragments of Henri Lefebvre's The Production of Space (1991 trans.), Toni Morrison's, Playing in the Dark: Whiteness and the Literary Imagination (1992), Teresa de Lauretis' Alice Doesn't: Feminism, Semiotics, Cinema (1984), and Wallace Martin's Recent Theories of Narrative (1986). We will also watch a documentary on Ellis Island, "An Island of Hope, an Island of Tears," and a slide-show tour of its contemporary museum of immigration. Several feature films will also help contextualize visually some of the discussions that we will engage in concerning the issues of popular representation of immigrant identity: from Charlie Chaplin's burlesque depiction of passage into America in "The Immigrant" (1917), through later productions, such as "The Jazz Singer" or the cinematic re-reading of gender and power dynamics in Cahan's "Yekl," to productions depicting issues of miscegenation, kinship, and transculturation in "Mississippi Masala" and "The Joy Luck Club," as well as John Sayles' reevaluation of the "melting pot" in "Lone Star" (1996). Requirements include attendance, participation, oral and written reports, and a longer, final research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 850. Advanced Graduate Seminar in Primary Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Should be taken as early as possible in the student's dissertation work. Student's may enroll in it at any point after advancement to candidacy, although it will ordinarily be taken immediately after the field examinations have been completed. This course will be designed to support students in getting their dissertations under way. However, some students may frame a dissertation topic early and wish to begin working on it before taking the field examinations; therefore, the course will ensure that it is also useful to students who are further along with their work. The class will include basic questions about research methods, collective critique of work in draft, discussion of ethics of scholarship and academic life, practical information about submitting papers for conferences and articles for publication, and visits from Program faculty from a variety of fields to discuss professional issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Amer. Cult. 899. Special Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Amer. Cult. 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate Standing. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Amer. Cult. 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Prerequisites & Distribution: GSTA award. Graduate Standing. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate Standing. Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

This page was created at 7:47 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.


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