College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Cultural Anthropology (Division 319)

This page was created at 7:48 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Cultural Anthropology

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ANTHRCUL

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Cultural Anthropology this week go to What's New This Week.


Anthro. 414/AAS 444. Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell Owusu (omk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. AAS 202 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean. Topics covered include: the historical origins of the social structure and social organization of contemporary Caribbean states; family and kinship; religion, race, class, ethnicity, and national identity; Caribbean immigration; politics and policies of socioeconomic change. The course is open to both anthropology concentrators and non-concentrators. Films and videos on the Caribbean will be shown when available. Requirements: four 3-5 page typewritten papers, which ask students to synthesize reading and lecture materials; participation in class discussions; regular class attendance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 415. Andean Civilization.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concentration in Anthropology. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is about the cultures, societies, languages, and histories of the Andean region of south America from the time of the Inkas until today. The Inkas and other Andean peoples developed civilizations of extraordinary complexity and cultural richness, with a modern legacy that is equally rich and culturally diverse. Who were the Inkas and how are they related to modern Andean peoples? What kind of evidence can we use to understand them? How do the lives of modern Andean peoples draw on similar cultural resources in changed circumstances. We consider historical and ethnographic evidence to understand narrative, ritual, social organization, exchange, control of land and water resources, ethnicity, music, and language.

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Anthro. 416/Hist. 476. Latin America: The Colonial Period.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 476.001.

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Anthro. 420. Anthropology of Contemporary American Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Upton (rupton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in anthropology. (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Anthropology 420 will address contemporary issues in American social life, including but not limited to, the meaning of the family and kinship, the concept of American "culture", religion and state, meanings and constructions of race and ethnic identity, class structure and the role of the body in everyday life. We will take as central the concept and construction of gender as a defining aspect for individuals in the U.S. and will use various media sources to explore and highlight these issues. Students will be expected to be able to apply advanced concepts in anthropological discourse to these issues and two previous courses in Anthropology are required. Graduate students may take the course for Rackham credit. Also this course is approved for Social Science Distribution.

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Anthro. 425. Evolution of War and Peace in Unstratified Societies.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raymond Kelly (rck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in anthropology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the origins of war and the early evolutionary development of war alliance and peace-making. It examines the conditions under which warfare is initiated in sociocultural contexts where it did not previously exist and elucidates the origin of war in that sense. The course begins with a delineation of the distinctive characteristics of peaceful (or warless) societies that represent both a prior sociocultural disposition and the context in which primal warfare arises and takes shape. Consideration of peaceful societies illuminates certain key features of the transition from warlessness to warfare and provides a basis for identifying transitional cases. These sociocultural systems exemplify the causes, conduct, and consequences of nascent and early warfare. The subsequent co-evolution of war and pre-state societies is traced, including the development of alliance and peacemaking. Format: lecture and discussion. Requirements: substantial term paper and presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

Anthro. 442/ACABS 413/Hist. 440. Ancient Mesopotamia: History and Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~nyoffee/syllancient%20mesop-2000.htm

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 413.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 451/AAS 459. African-American Religion.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in the social sciences. AAS 201 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the nature of religion in the lives of humans, within the framework of culture, and as a pervasive social institution. It will focus on the special case of the intensive and involved character of religion in the history and the lives of African-Americans. These special uses of religion create special problems. We will analyze those problems. The course objectives are to:

  • introduce the subject of religion as a social institution, as a pervasive component of culture, and as a contemporary adjustment and adaptation to peculiar social problems;
  • demonstrate how an anthropological analysis can be used to understand religion in contemporary society;
  • develop skills in critical thinking and analysis;
  • present the relationship between culture, institutions, religion, subculture, and the nature of man (humans); and
  • enable students to understand the religious institutions of humans generally and African-Americans specifically.
The course is open to all students, and it requires no special background or preparation. There will be two examinations. Class participation and attendance are graded.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

Anthro. 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Language, Culture, & Society in Africa. Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 458.005.

Instructor(s): Judith Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3).May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores African languages in relation to the cultural background, historical circumstances, and social settings of their speakers. A first set of topics concerns African language families and population history: How have languages been grouped together in families, and what problems are there in doing this? Does the geographical distribution of languages shed light on African population history, and does it match up with what we know about African history from other sources? What are African languages like, structurally? A second set of topics concerns local cultural systems: How are local ways of life, conventions of social interaction, religious and political traditions, and social hierarchies reflected in linguistic practices? How do aesthetic genres such as oral poetry, epic narrative, "drum languages," etc., get produced and performed, and what is their role in social life? A third set of topics concerns language in the context of postcolonial states: What's the relationship between indigenous languages, religious languages, and European languages in African nations' public policy? In literacy, education, law, the media? Assignments include active class participation; two papers (one 5-page, one 10-page); and two 1-hour tests.

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Anthro. 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 Political Violence and Memory.

Instructor(s): Julie Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3).May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the relationship between political violence, historical memory and social transformation. It focuses on conflicts involving the state in colonial societies and independent nations, and links instances of exceptional violence to existing structural relations and political discourses. It considers how violence both produces and destroys cultural meanings and how the concept of violence is itself shaped by social theories and cultural beliefs. We will analyze acts of repression and forms of resistance as they relate to the construction or denial of contending versions of the past. Topics to be considered include: the racialization and gendering of violence; riots and massacres; trauma and memory; monuments and commemorative acts. Students will write brief commentaries, a midterm and a research paper.

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Anthro. 494. Introduction to Analytical Methods in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Whallon (whallon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in statistics. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to the major methods of statistical analysis used in archaeological research.

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Anthro. 508./History 509. Empire and Culture in British India.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001

Instructor(s): Sumathi Ramaswami

Prerequisites & Distribution: History 151 or 255; Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 509.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 526. Traditions of Ethnology I.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001

Instructor(s): Conrad Kottak

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course presents the major schools and traditions in ethnology from its nineteenth-century precursors to about 1950. It is the first part of a year-long sequence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Anthro. 530. Oral History and Narrative Identity.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001

Instructor(s): Janet Hart (janeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Oral histories are spoken memories about the past. In "managed" or negotiated conversations, subjects recall experiences which they now find relevant from a contemporary standpoint, bearing witness to the everyday, the tramatic, the spectacular and the silent. In response to prompts by interviews, speakers explain, in sometimes subtle and context-bound languages, why they believe episodes happened as they did and attempt to account for their own involvement. Methodologically, oral histories can stand alone, to be read and analyzed on their own terms, or they can supplement other "ways of knowing" to be found in archives, quantitative data bases, written records and memoirs. Through narrative, individuals and communities conceptualize social processes in the form of stories, with leading charactres, plot structures and time boundaries. From this perspective, embedded in oral histories are narratives that people use to help them make sense of various occurrences in their lives. At a broader level of abstraction, local and national cultures also create and foster "meta-narritives" or composite understandings shared by larger groups of protagonists at particular points in history. This course is about oral histories and other specifically narrative constructions of selfhood. We will cover various theories and debates surrounding oral history and narrative, and read several ethnographies which utillize these concepts. Student evaluations will be based on class participation, several short writing assignmnts and in-class exercises, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 532. Politics and Practice of Ethnography.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Robertson (jennyrob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate students, qualified seniors with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Ethnography" contains two distinct senses: fieldwork and writing. It is as a category of anthropological writing that we will explore current discourses on ethnography, and the place of archival research and fieldwork (and especially field notes) therein. In reading ethnographies published from the turn of the century to the present, we will investigate the articulation of: form and content, figure and ground, and theory and practice, and analyze narrative styles and structure, the relationship between field notes and published texts, and uses of illustrations and photographs, foreign languages, acknowledgments, bibliographies, and various other political (and politicized) ethnographic forms and practices. An author's professional and social position and identity will be included as grist for our analytical mill, and we will situate each ethnography within its historical and academic context. By the same token, each text will serve as a point of departure for an exploration of historically situated ethnographic methods, including archival work, and anthropological theories. The formation and revision of anthropological canons, and coevality of theoretical approaches is a part of this exploration.

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Anthro. 546/MHM 547. Introduction to Ethnomusicology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joseph Lam

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Music History and Musicology 547.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 553. Blurred Genres: Autobiography, Fiction & Ethnography.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: 400-level coursework in Anthropology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Where does the story of the observer end and the story of the observed begin? Autobiography, ethnography, and fiction share a concern with constructing meaningful representations of the self and of the other in narrative form. This course will focus on the history, politics, and possibilities of interconnecting autobiography, ethnography, and fiction. We will read widely in a variety of ethnographic, fictional, and autobiographic genres, including literary journalism, autobiographic ethnography, feminist ethnography, fieldwork accounts, the memoir, autobiographical criticism, family stories, and fiction that uses first-person voices. Our theoretical aim will be to gain an understanding of our current historical moment as one in which writers both inside and outside of the academy are pursuing intersecting trajectories in their use of the personal voice to explore the social world. We will consider the recent "memoir boom" and its impact on the academy as well as the academy's impact on its flourishing. We will also consider gender differences in the use of the personal voice, exploring the fine line that distinguishes "reflexive" (often coded as "male") and "confessional" (often coded as "female") writing within anthropology. And we will ask what anthropology, as a personal act of witnessing scripted in diverse genres, means at the end of the century. Our practical aim will be to gain expertise in the analysis and use of a range of textual strategies, including monologue, dialogue, first person narrative, third person narrative, flashback, different methods of quoting or paraphrasing "informants," and descriptive accounts of other places, times, and subjectivities.

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Anthro. 576. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu), Judith Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in anthropology or biology. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an intensive introduction to theoretical issues in linguistics of special relevance to anthropologists, most of whose primary interests are outside of language. Think of language as a special kind of semiotic or cultural system. Our subject matter, then, consists of ways of approaching its formal description and the general issues (for the most part, about the nature of culture) that are raised by those approaches. Several such issues will continually crop up:

  1. The nature of cultural patterning, its representation by members of a culture, and the means we use to describe it; is it possible to understand cultural patterning from the outside? How does our point of view change in the course of analysis?
  2. The possibility of cross-cultural comparison and typology using culturally-meaningful (or "emic") patterns as a basis; can general "laws of structure" of cultural form be constructed from descriptions of particular cultural systems?
  3. Are there true universals of culture? If universals do exist, what is their basis? Are they biologically determined, determined by the nature of the cultural code, or some combination of the two? What evidence is required to make sense of the question?
  4. What does it mean for individuals to share a culture? Does "sharing a culture" require collective representations? Are there any?
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Anthro. 579. Semiotic Anthropology.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001

Instructor(s): Webb Keane (wkeane@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: 400-level course work in Anthropology and Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Signs and representations have come to play a central role in understanding of society, culture, and politics. This seminar explores the genealogy of contemporary approaches to signs through the close reading of selected theoretical works, from such foundational figures as Peirce, Saussure, and Mauss to more recent writings, including Derrida, Foucault, Bourdieu and others. The seminar raises questions about the assumptions and implications of these approaches for the empirical study of society and culture. This course is not a survey the syllabus is intentionally limited, and is intended to provide an opportunity for careful and critical approaches to the tests. Students interested in cultural theory are welcome from any department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 581. Archaeology I.

Archaeology

Section 001

Instructor(s): Robert Whallon (whallon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Roughly half of this course is devoted to developing models of the operation and evolution of Hunter-Gatherer cultural systems and to discussing the ways in which these systems may be studied from the archaeological record. The second half of the course consists of a review of the archaeological evidence from the evolution of these cultural systems from their earliest appearance until the beginnings of sedentary agricultural communities. Emphasis is given to Africa with breif attention paid to Asia and the New World.

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Anthro. 593. Archaeological Systematics.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John O'Shea (joshea@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrators, graduates, with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed principally for graduate students in anthropology. It examines the epistemological basis for archaeology, major theoretical frameworks for reconstructing past human organization and studying its change, and methodological approaches appropriate for such investigations. The course is designed as a seminar, with strong emphasis on active student participation. There are no exams, but a paper is required at the end of the term. Prerequisites include graduate standing in anthropology, or permission of the instructor.

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Anthro. 619/LACS 619/Hist. 617. Proseminar on Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001 State and Nation.

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Latin American and Caribbean Studies 619.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 629. Method and Interpretation in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001

Instructor(s): Raymond Kelly (rck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior or graduate standing. (1, 3).

Credits: (1, 3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is concerned with anthropological field research from research design and grant proposal writing, to data collection and analysis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 683. Topics in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001 Principles of Social Evolution

Instructor(s): Kent Flannery

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (2-3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will cover recent advances in archaeological research. Each semester that it is offered a different topic will be discussed by one of the department's archaeologists. Potential subjects are prehistoric demography, origins of agriculture, zooarchaeology, social formation, etc.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Anthro. 683. Topics in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 002 Archaeology of Death

Instructor(s): Augustin Holl

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (2-3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines mortuary proctices and their change through time from their remote origins 1000,000 years ago to the present.

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Anthro. 726/Doctoral 848 (Social Work). Cultural Perspectives on Adolescence.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001

Instructor(s): Janet Finn (jlfinn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Doctoral standing in Social Work or graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the concept of adolescence in historical, cultural, and political context. We begin with the "invention" of adolescence as a sociocultural category and explore shifting popular and professional constructions of adolescence throughout the 20th century. We will draw on classic and contemporary theoretical and ethnographic accounts of adolescence in exploring the multiple and contested meanings given to this "flexible" time and space between child and adulthood. We will pay particular attention to current preoccupations with the pathologies of adolescence, the ways in which understanding of troubled and troubling youth are culturally costructed, and the ways in which representations of pathology map onto those of gender, race, class, nation and sexuality. Finally, we will consider the social participation of young people themselves and the ways in which youth are making their own ways in the world both because and in spite of the forces defining and constraining them.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 760/Psych. 689. Culture and Cognition.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001 Culture and Cognition First Year Seminar

Instructor(s): Ramaswami Mahalingham

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology and permission of instructor. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 689.001.

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Anthro. 777. Lingusitic Anthropology Laboratory.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001

Instructor(s): Alaina Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing in Anthropology Or A Related Discipline. (1-3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Anthro. 825/Hist. 825/Chinese 825/Econ. 825/Pol. Sci. 825/Soc. 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 825.001.

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Anthro. 957. Research Practicum in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-8). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2-8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Anthro. 958. Anthropological Research.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course requires a substancial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Anthro. 959. Survey of Literature on Selected Topics.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Anthro. 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate Standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

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Anthro. 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate Standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

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Anthro. 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate Standing; Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

This page was created at 7:48 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.


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