College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session on wolverineacccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies (Division 325)

This page was created at 7:49 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies

Wolverine Access Subject listing for AAPTIS

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies this week go to What's New This Week.


AAPTIS 401/Hist. of Art 401. The Art and Architecture of Armenia.

Armenian Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christina Maranci

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/401-001.html

Wedged between the powerful empires of Byzantium and Sassanian and Islamic Near East, medieval Armenia formed a crossroads between East and West. In the sumptuous manuscripts, domed churches, and relief sculpture of Armenia, we will explore the development of a rich and complex artistic identity, at once highly distinctive and also an index of interaction with the cultures of Byzantium, Islam, and medieval West.

The course will survey Armenian art and architecture from the fourth to the fifteenth centuries, AD, examining the development of manuscript illumination, including the lavish tradition of the kingdom of Cilicia and secular cycles such as the Romance of Alexander. We will also consider the emergence of domed, centrally-planned buildings, the proliferation of monastic complexes, the development of relief sculpture, and a peculiarly Armenian type of cross-stone (khatchk'ar). Works of art will be located within their historical and social context, focusing on issues of patronage, cultural exchange, and cultural appropriation.

Christina Maranci is a specialist in Armenian art. She holds a Ph.D. from the Department of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University for a dissertation on medieval Armenian architecture and sculpture.

Any questions can be directed to Kristy Demas, Armenian Studies Program Coordinator, at 764-7087 or kdemas@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 403. Advanced Modern Standard Arabic I.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mousamitry Khoury

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 202. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course emphasizes the use of Arabic language. That is, students will develop the ability to: (1) communicate/speak in Arabic with native speakers of Arabic; (2) understand spoken Arabic; (3) read and understand selected readings taken from various genres of modern prose fiction and non-fiction as well as Arabic newspaper and magazines/ and (4) enhance writing skills. Use of Arabic is emphasized throughout the whole course based on communicative approaches to learning. Course grade is based on class attendance and participation, written assignments, weekly quizzes and tests, and a final exam.

Required text:

  1. Peter Abboud et al., Elementary Modern Standard Arabic Part II (Lessons 30-45),
  2. Supplementary Enrichment Vocabulary to Accompany EMSA, and
  3. Standard Achievement Tests to Accompany EMSA.
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 415. Colloquial Egyptian Arabic, I.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Muhammad Eissa (eissa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 202 or 403. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

While Modern Standard Arabic is the prevailing medium used in books, newspapers, formal presentations, news bulletin in radios and televisions, official documentation etc., regional spoken dialects prevail in daily communication at homes, work places, and realistic media programs.

Egyptian colloquial Arabic is virtually the one dialect that Arabs in all countries can understand. That is simply because of its wide spread use in entertainment program which are heard and/or viewed inside and outside the Arab world. It is also the dialect of Arabic used in the most populated Arab country, Egypt.

This is the first segment of a two-term course sequence introducing Egyptian (spoken) colloquial Arabic. The objective is to enable learners to speak and comprehend Egyptian spoken dialect through systematic presentation of the pronunciation, structure, and situational dialogues in the language. The instruction will make use of audio visual materials rich in cultural content and linguistic support.

Evaluation in this course will take into consideration the vital importance of class attendance and participation. There will be periodical quizzes, midterm and final examinations. Oral tests are central to the evaluating process.

Textbook(s) and A/V material for the course are to be announced later.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2

AAPTIS 432. Arabic Phonology and Morphophonology.

Linguistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew Freeman (andyf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One year of Arabic. Taught in English. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/aaptis/432/001.nsf

This course aims at teaching either an undergraduate student concentrating in Arabic or a graduate student in the Department of Near Eastern Studies the Phonology, Morphology and some features of the Syntax of Modern Standard Arabic. The course is primarily descriptive. Very basic linguistics terminology will be introduced as needed. Beginning with a brief description of phonology the course will cover in some detail the sounds and the sound system of Arabic. The unit on morphology will cover: the root-pattern system, verbal and plural ablaut, word formation rules and the non-concatenative morphology of Arabic. The unit on syntax will cover: case and case-marking, word-order, sub-categorization of the lexicon, especially verbs, phrasal verbs and the place of the connectors in Modern Standard Arabic. The grade will be based on occasional unannounced quizzes, a midterm, a short paper (5-10 pages), class attendance, class participation, and a final paper (10-15 pages).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 451. Introductory Ottoman Turkish, I.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): G Hagen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Turkish 152 or 155. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Part of the sequence of courses required of concentrators, MA and Ph.D. candidates. The objective is to have speedy access to the printed word in Ottoman Turkish in the Arabic script. Method of instruction is through the study of texts while reviewing the Arabic and Persian elements in the language. It is intended for those studying Turkish for the purpose of reading Ottoman texts and archives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 463/Hist. 537. The Near East in the Period of the Crusades, 945-1258.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Adam Sabra

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Taught in English. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course covers a crucial period of Near Eastern history, during which the medieval struggle between Islam and Christianity reached its height. Topics include the Crusades and Jihad; relations between Muslims, Christians, and Jews; the struggle between Sunni and Shi'i Islam; as well as later developments such as the Mamluk slave sultanate and the arrival of the Black Death in the Near East. Developments within Islamic society such as the creation of the sufi orders, shifting trade patterns, and the structure of cities will also be considered. Paper(s), midterm, final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

AAPTIS 491. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Section 001 History & Anthropology of Yemen: from 7th Century to the Present.

Instructor(s): Mikhail Rodionov

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/comm/491/001.nsf

This course examines historical and anthropological aspects of Yemeni society throughout since the rise of Islam until today. The focus will be on the tribal structure and traditional strata of this society, on the social functions and occupations of Yemeni population, on their world-outlooks, values, norms and practices, and on the ways in which they were articulated in different historical periods. Grades will be based on class presentations, class discussions, a midterm exam, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

AAPTIS 501. Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raji Rammuny (raram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 404. Taught in Arabic. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The objectives of this course are to develop fluency and accuracy in understanding, speaking, and writing modern standard Arabic, and to expand students' awareness of Arab-Islamic culture and civilization. The course is based on a variety of literary texts and authentic cultural audio-visual materials including slides, video cassettes, and films. The course materials reflect not only the literary but also the cultural, social, and political trends of contemporary Arab society. Occasionally, students are required to read outside topics and give brief presentations. Evaluation is based on daily preparations, weekly written compositions, monthly tests, and a final paper in Arabic. Textbook is Advanced Standard Arabic by Raji Rammuny. Parts One and Two.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

AAPTIS 563. Modern Arabic Nonfiction.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Trevor LeGassick (tleg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 403 or reading knowledge of Arabic. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces the work of major Arab writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Variable in focus according to the interests of the class, readings are selected for translation, analysis, and commentary. The course explores the historical progression in the development of political and societal theories in modern times in the Arab world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 568. Classical Arabic Poetry.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Noorani

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 403. Conducted in Arabic. (3).May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


AAPTIS 581. Classical Arabic III.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Muhammad Eissa (eissa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 482. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for students who wish to learn Arabic for academic purposes. We will begin with the sound and writing system of Arabic, paying attention to accurate pronunciation of sounds and writing Arabic words and phrases with a pleasing hand. Then, we will move to reading, translating and discussion short passages selected from the Qur'an, Hadith, and medieval Islamic literature. There will be daily reading and written assignments. Evaluation will be based on class participation and performance, monthly tests, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 583. Medieval Arabic Historical and Geographical Texts.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001 The Nature of History as a Discipline: Arabic Historiography in the Classical Period (up to A. D. 1500).

Instructor(s): Adam Sabra

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 404. (3).May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide students with an introduction to Arabic historiography in the classical period (up to A. D. 1500). The emphasis will be on the close reading and translation of primary sources including chronicles, biographical dictionaries, the sira literature, and the study of hadith. The theme will be the nature of history as a discipline. How did medieval Arabic writers approach historical knowledge? What was history in their view? Where did history fit in the classification of the sciences? Texts may include works by Tabari, Mas'udi, and Ibn Khaldun. Assignments may include some work with manuscript material. Reading knowledge of Arabic required. Various assignments geared to testing students' ability to use primary texts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

AAPTIS 584. Persianate History Through Political and Cultural Texts.

Persian Literature and Culture in Persian

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Advanced reading knowledge of Persian. (3).May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The object of the course is to familiarize students of Iranian and Turkic history with a variety of genres of writings emanating from their shared Persianate cultural spheres. Geographically, it shall scrutinize "texts" from Anatolia, Iraq, Iran, Central Asia and India, those very lands in which Persian became the hegemonic language of politics and literature in the medieval and early modern ages (11-17th cent.). It analyses mediums through which the Persian language became the vehicle for continuity of Pre-Islamic Indo-Iranian conceptions of history, cosmos, kingship, spirituality, and social stratification. The choice demonstrates how the Islamic synthesis between Arab, Persian, and Turko-Mongol traditions are objectified in these particular genres. The following genres shall be studied: court chronicles, "Mirrors of princes", biographies of poets, hagiographies, local histories, religious poetry, disputations and epics, chancellery documents, such as land grants, firmans and diplomatic correspondence. Some readings shall be from manuscripts to introduce the student to paleography. Secondary scholarship will be assigned to place the texts within their wider historical contexts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 798. Directed Graduate Readings.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


AAPTIS 837. Applied Linguistics and the Teaching of Arabic.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raji Rammuny (raram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and advanced knowledge of Arabic. Graduate Standing. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


AAPTIS 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate Standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

AAPTIS 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Must have a Teaching Assistantship. Graduate Standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

AAPTIS 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate Standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: 8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

This page was created at 7:49 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.


University of Michigan | College of LS&A | LS&A Research and Graduate Education | Rackham Bulletin Index | Rackham School of Graduate Studies

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2000 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.