College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Biology (Division 328)

This page was created at 7:50 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Biology

Wolverine Access Subject listing for BIOLOGY

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Biology.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Biology this week go to What's New This Week.


Biol. 400. Advanced Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: 12 credits of biology, 3.0 average in science, and permission of faculty member in biology. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended for those engaged in original research at an advanced level. This course number is most frequently elected by senior Honors students who have completed Biology 300 and who are completing their research and writing their thesis. A final paper is required. (Refer to the description of Biology 300 for more information.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Biol. 407. Advanced Genetic Principles.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven Clark (clarks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 305 and Biol. 310, 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The advent of molecular biology and genomic resources has revolutionized the genetic and molecular tools available to researchers. Emphasis in the course is placed on modern approaches used in studies of animals, plants, and microbes to illuminate genetic and molecular genetic principles. The course covers advanced Mendelian genetics (including complex genetic pathways, activation screens, enhancer/suppressor mutagenesis, and cell autonomy studies), reverse genetics (including knock-outs, antisense technology, viral-induced gene silencing, and gene- and enhancer-traps), and molecular genetics (including expression analysis, misexpression, metabolic engineering, and marker gene fusions and attendant screens). Students will be evaluated by a midterm and final exam, an oral presentation, a term paper, and a genomics project. This course is intended for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students. The course will meet twice a week for one-and-one-half hours.

Course requirements include a midterm and final exam, an oral presentation, a term paper, and a genomics project. The term paper will be 5 pages and it will be a critical analysis of a primary research article. The lectures include discussion and interactions with students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 411. Protein Structure and Function.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Bardwell (jbardwel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 310, 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio411/

A taste of bioinformatics. This course is a practical hands-on approach to extract information about protein and DNA sequences. Students will learn how to do elementary sequence analysis databases, searching, alignment, and 3D structure prediction using analysis tools that are available on the web. Students will learn how to get the most out of their sequence. We will also discuss how protein structure is related to function, and investigate how proteins fold.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code:

Biol. 412. Teaching Biochemistry by the Keller Plan.

Instructor(s): Marcy Osgood (mosgood@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 311 and permission of instructor. (3).This is a graded course. May not be included in any of the Biological Sciences concentration programs. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio311/proctor.shtml

Undergraduates who previously have taken an introductory biochemistry course act as TAs for Introductory Biochemistry (Biology 311). TAs meet with the instructor for a two-hour class each week for lectures, presentations, and discussions of teaching and biochemistry. TAs also prepare a report on a recent advance in biochemistry which they present to their peers and the instructor. The major roles of the TAs are to examine the students on their mastery of unit material and to help the students with explanations supplementary to the textbook. At the completion of an instructor-generated written quiz, the student and TA grade the quiz together. TAs learn considerable biochemistry by repeated teachings of unit materials and, in addition, profit from their experience as teachers and evaluators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Biol. 418. Endocrinology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Denver (rdenver@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162, 225, and organic chemistry. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio418/bio418.htm

This course is a comparative study of animal endocrine functions with emphasis on the cellular origin and chemical nature of hormones, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of hormone action, general endocrine control mechanisms, the evolution of hormones and hormonal control and their physiological actions in animals. The course will concentrate on the endocrine systems of vertebrates; there will be limited treatment of human endocrinology. Instruction in Biology 418 assumes a basic familiarity with general and comparative physiology. Training in chemistry through organic is essential, and courses in biochemistry and cell and molecular biology are helpful.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 422/Cell and Developmental Biology 422. Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Kuwada (kuwada@umich.edu) , Bruce Oakley (boakley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152-154, or 195), one year of physics, prior or concurrent enrollment in biochemistry. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio422/422home.html

This course deals primarily with the properties of individual nerve cells, and small groups of nerve cells. This provides the basis for understanding information processing by the nervous system, learning and memory, development of neurons, and neurological and psychiatric disorders. Considerable emphasis will be placed on understanding the molecules that endow the nervous system with these properties.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 423. Introduction to Research in Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Hume (rhume@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in Biol. 422; or completion of Biol. 222 or 422, and permission of instructor. (3).Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio423/bio423syl.htm

This lab course provides an introduction to experimental approaches in neurobiology. Emphasis is on molecular, anatomical, and physiological approaches for studying neuronal function. Among the molecular topics to be covered are analysis of cDNA clones, PCR amplification of DNA and expression of genes in foreign tissues. Among the anatomical topics to be covered are gross and microscopic anatomy of nervous systems, axonal pathway tracing, and immunocytochemical localization of specific neuronal proteins. Among the physiological topics to be covered are intracellular, extracellular and patch clamp recording, as well as the use of computers in the acquisition and analysis of data. This course is intended for students who plan to engage in research in neurobiology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Biol. 427. Molecular Biology.

Section 001 Every Student Must Reserve Mondays, Oct. 2, Nov. 6, and Dec. 11, from 6:00-8:00 p.m. for Exams.

Instructor(s): Robert Helling (helling@umich.edu) , Jianming Li (jian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 305; and Biol. 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Comprehensive coverage of the general principles governing the structures, synthesis, and functions of DNA, RNA, and proteins in the context of the cell. Emphasizes understanding methods and interpretation of data. Topics include genome organization, DNA replication and transposition, chromosome segregation, transcription and translation, the processing of macromolecules, signal transfer, and regulation at various levels. Two lectures per week are supplemented by a 1.5 hour discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 428. Cell Biology.

Section 001 Every Student Must Reserve Mondays, Oct. 9 and Nov 13, 6:00-8:00 p.m., for Exams.

Instructor(s): Jesse Hay (jessehay@umich.edu) , Laura Olsen (ljo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 305; and Biol. 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. Students with credit for Biol. 320 must obtain permission of instructor. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio428/

Biology 428 is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of the biology of eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the cellular and molecular level. This course is intended for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students. The information is presented at a level that requires students to integrate information from their other biology, chemistry, and biochemistry courses. Topics include: cell structure and function; cell membranes; intracellular organelles and cytoskeleton; inter- and intra-cellular signaling; cell development; and cell cycle. Students will be expected to integrate the scientific data presented in class as well as to read and interpret basic research drawn from the current scientific literature. Grades will be based on three exams and the discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 433/NR&E 433. Ornithology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terry Root (tlroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162. (4).Laboratory fee ($75) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($75) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.ummz.lsa.umich.edu/birds/ornclass/

This course examines the physiology, ecology, social behavior, systematics, history, and conservation of birds. Lecture topics include flight, physiology, respiration, circulation, visual and vocal communication, adaptations for different life styles, individual and social behavior, migration, breeding biology, cooperative breeding and brood parasitism, and the origin and speciation of birds, and the conservation of birds. Field trips to different habitats to observe wild birds, and laboratories are focused on identification, morphology and behavior. Background: a course in biology, or permission of instructor and an interest in birds. Student evaluation is based on field and lab quizzes, two topic papers, three lecture exams, and a written final exam. Required books: Text to be announced and Field Guide to the Birds of North America, 2nd ed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 435. Intracellular Trafficking.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jesse Hay (jessehay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 305, Biol. 310, 311, or Biol. Chem. 415, and Biol. 428. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an advanced discussion-oriented course covering the latest research in the field of intracellular trafficking. Topics covered include molecular basis of secretion, vesicle transport, protein targeting, molecular motors, and organelle biogenesis. Students will be presented lectures providing them with enough background to understand specific questions and gaps in our knowledge of intracellular trafficking mechanisms. However, most of the class time will be spent discussing current research papers from the primary literature. The emphasis will be on the critical evaluation of these studies' experimental approaches, interpretation of data and conclusions.

This course is intended for students with a serious interest in cell biological research. It is intended for advanced, graduate school-bound undergraduates, and first- and second-year graduate students. There will be two 1.5 hour class periods per week. Students will be assigned problem sets to ensure that they have done the reading before class and have thought sufficiently about the issues involved. The course will also require participation in discussion. In addition, each student will have to present at least one research paper to the class, explain the questions being addressed, techniques, pitfalls, etc.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 436(336). Introductory Immunology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eric Mann (ericmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 305 and biochemistry (Biol. 310, 311, or Biol. Chem. 415). (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended to introduce pre-professional and biology concentrators to the theoretical and experimental principles of immunology. Topics covered include: a detailed study of the molecules, cells, and organs that constitute the immune system; the innate and adaptive immune responses; and the role of the immune system in host defense, allergy, and organ transplantation. Topics will be illustrated with clinical case studies. Grades are based on three exams. The course is appropriate for concentrations in biology, microbiology, and cell and molecular biology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 440/NR&E 422. Biology of Fishes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Fink (wfink@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 and one additional biology course. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~bio440

Lectures cover many aspects of the biology of lower vertebrates known as fishes, including evolution, physiology, functional morphology, phylogeny, biogeography, ecology, behavior and reproduction. Much of the course involves participation in the class web site, which should be consulted for a syllabus, descriptions of expectations, and specifics of topics to be discussed. Evaluation of students is based on a take-home midterm exam, a cumulative closed-book final exam, a "capsule" describing the biology of a particular fish species (chosen by the student) for inclusion on the web site, and class participation. All exams consist of essay questions that will require a synthesis of class material, and logic examination of novel problems. An optional laboratory course (Bio 441/NR&E 423) examines field methods, classification, and identification of Michigan fishes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 441/NR&E 423. The Biology of Fishes Laboratory.

Instructor(s): Gerald Smith (grsmith@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 and one additional biology course. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~bio440/LABORATORIES.HTML

Optional laboratory course accompanying Biology 440, providing an introduction to the field methods used in fish biology and fisheries, and examining the diversity of the Michigan ichthyofauna and major groups of world fishes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 459. Systematic Botany.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Willliam Anderson (wra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152-154, or 195), or Biol. 255. (4).Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Plant biodiversity taught with lectures, color projection slides, specimens, living plants, and laboratories. Emphasis at level of orders, families, and genera, temperate and tropical, to familiarize students with plants from all parts of the world. Focuses mainly on flowering plants but also gymnosperms and pteridophytes. Subjects like habitats, endangered species, geography, biosystematics, cladistics, and floral biology are given special lectures. Plant systematics is essential to botanists but the course is needed also by conservationists, ecologists, zoologists, foresters, and ethnobotanists. Some students take the course simply because they enjoy plants. Two midterms, a final, and lab quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 461. Morphology and Evolution of Vascular Plants.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robyn Burnham (rburnham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 154) or 255. (5).Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/bio461/

The course explores the evolutionary relationships of vascular plants through their morphology, anatomy and life cycles. Lectures will examine the characters used to determine evolutionary relationships among the major groups of vascular plants, both extant and extinct. Major groups covered are mosses, ferns, seed ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. Laboratory sessions will familiarize participants with interpreting vegetative and reproductive organs in each group. Two lecture exams, two lab exams, one term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 468. Mushrooms and Molds: Biology and Use.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Fogel (rfogel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 154). (5).Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The mushrooms and molds have changed the course of human history and continue to have a profound impact on man and the global ecosystem as important plant, insect, and human pathogens and as important nutrient recyclers. Their increasing importance in biotechnology has brought new recognition to these fascinating and unique organisms. This course surveys the members of the Kingdom Fungi, provides an introduction to their ecology, physiology, genetics, and importance in biotechnology, medical mycology, and plant pathology through lectures, laboratories, and field trips. This course is important for students interested in careers in biotechnology, medical mycology, biodiversity, plant pathology, forest pathology, systematics, and ecology. Grades are based on three hourly exams and a term project. General Biology (Biol. 162), or equivalent, is a recommended prerequisite.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 477. Laboratory in Field Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Vandermeer (jvander@umich.edu) , Lisa Curran (lcurran@umich.edu) , Ivette Perfecto (perfecto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in ecology. (5).Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Organizational Meeting, 5 p.m. in 2044 Nat. Sci. on Wednesday, September 6. This Course will Meet September 15 October 27, Friday Evenings Beginning At 7:00 p.m. and Concluding Sunday Evenings At 7:00 p.m. There will Also be a Weekly Meeting on Tuesdays from 5-7 p.m.

Ecology students require intensive practice in making field observations and systematically exploring the implications of those observations. One vehicle for doing so is the "field problem" based course, in which a faculty member chooses a general topic and works with a small group of students exploring that topic for an entire day. The field problem-based course is distinct from the laboratory course in that field problems seek to explore an unknown area. The course does not include "set labs" or repeats of well-known patterns. The professor and students seek to explore a specific research question that has not been examined before. The exercise of working through the details of a new problem along with the professor gives the student practice in the creative part of the scientific endeavor. Working with a variety of faculty members the student experiences several "styles" of doing science. The general structure of the course, centered around the field problem, encourages a great deal of discussion among students and between students and faculty. A major goal of the course is to facilitate that discussion. In addition, there is a relatively large lecture load, with an average of four lectures per week.

The Patterson Lake Nature Center is in southeastern Livingston County, approximately 25 miles northwest of Ann Arbor. The Center adjoins the E.S. George Reserve, a University of Michigan research facility. Together the two offer nearly 2,000 acres of protected wildlands, containing a great variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats all available for research and teaching.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 480. Computer-Aided Inferences in Evolution and Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): George Estabrook (gfred@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior natural science concentrator or graduate student. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is for prospective professional researchers in natural science who want to learn the concepts, techniques, and language skills to formulate hypotheses so that computers (rather than mathematics) can derive predictions with which to compare data. Such hypotheses are less constrained by mathematical needs and so can better meet the needs of natural science.

This course will provide instruction (or review) in the fundamentals of PASCAL programming, and most techniques will be provided as PASCAL PROCEDURES already written and ready for you to use. No prior programming experience is required, and a working knowledge of high school algebra is sufficient. The course provides instruction (or review) of probability processes that can (and must) be made part of your scientific hypothesis. Predictions take the form of probability distributions that can directly impute significance to your observed data. Students work with the data of their choice, and discuss applications of the concepts in their areas of interest. A term project replaces the final exam. Lectures, discussion, computer lab.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 481. Population Dynamics and Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Deborah Goldberg (degold@umich.edu) , John Vandermeer (jvander@umich.edu) , Mark Wilson (wilsonml@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in ecology. Calculus is strongly recommended. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An examination of the principles of population ecology. Theoretical and empirical research on population dynamics and regulation of managed and natural populations are emphasized, as well as the development of the mathematical and computer skills for modeling dynamics of single and interacting populations. Specific topics include concepts of linear and nonlinear dynamics, demography, life history evolution, density-dependence and population regulation, and basic models of competition, mutualism, predator-prey, host-disease, and other population interactions. A background in ecology or permission of the instructor is required. There will be two 1.5 hour lectures and one two hour discussion section a week. Discussion sections will cover original readings from the literature and techniques for modeling populations. Course requirements include computer modeling projects and writeups, a midterm, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 489/NR&E 430. Soil Properties and Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Donald Zak (drzak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 and chemistry. (3).Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($25) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre430/

Soil as a central component of terrestrial ecosystems, with a particular emphasis on physical, chemical, microbiological processes as they are related to plant growth. Quantitative analysis and interpretation of field and laboratory data are stressed throughout the course. Temperate forest ecosystems are the primary focus of the course; however, numerous examples are drawn from boreal, temperate, and tropical ecosystems.

Prerequisites: Students are expected to have a background in chemistry and biology. In particular, a working knowledge of chemical equilibria, ionic solution chemistry, pH, and oxidation-reduction reactions is highly recommended. Students without such background should consult with the instructor before enrolling. Also useful (although not required) is familiarity with biochemistry, plant physiology, microbiology, geology, and local flora. You will find it very helpful if you have had Woody Plants (NRE 437). The lectures and laboratory exercises in Soil Properties and Processes have been designed to complement Forest Ecology (NRE 435), and we highly recommend that you enroll in these courses concurrently!

Course Goals: This course centers on the overlap of soil science, forest ecology, and ecosystem ecology. Our goal is to understand:

  1. How the interactions of landform, topography, climate, and biota over time lead to the patterns of soil development and the distribution of soil types that we observe within the landscape
  2. How physical, chemical and biological properties of forest soils affect water and nutrient availability to plants and, ultimately, ecosystem productivity
  3. How nutrients are cycled within forest ecosystems and how these processes are influenced by land management practices.

In the field portion of the course, we will sample and describe soils of four forest ecosystems and observe first-hand how differences in landform, topography, climate and biota influence soil development. In the laboratory we will analyze our soil samples for a number of physical, chemical, and biological properties. Using these data in conjunction with field data, each student will select two of the four ecosystems for detailed comparison in a term paper. Although we will focus our attention on local forest ecosystems of Michigan, skills learned in this course may be broadly applied within a variety of terrestrial ecosystem types in other geographic regions.

Laboratory: While the lecture portion of the course provides background knowledge, the laboratory portion of the course is an opportunity for students to gain hands-on experience sampling and describing soils in the field and analyzing various soil physical, chemical, and biological properties in the lab. The importance of the laboratory is reflected in the proportion of the time each week devoted to it. In each lab section, students will be grouped into teams of two or three. Activities and assignments in the lab will be cooperative efforts among team members. Attendance is critical to permit equal participation among team members, and all laboratory assignments are due at the beginning of the next laboratory meeting.

Required Texts:

  • Brady, N.C., and R.R. Weil. 1996. The Nature and Properties of Soils, 11th Edition. Collier MacMillan Publishers, N.Y.
  • Barnes, B.V., D.R. Zak, S. Denton, and S. Spurr. 1998. Forest Ecology. 4th Edition. John Wiley & Sons. NY.

Grades:

Course grades are distributed as follows:

  • Exam 1 30%
  • Exam 2 30%
  • Term Paper 25%
  • Lab Assignments 15%

The two exams are one hour each and will be graded on a 100 point scale. The second exam is cumulative and will be given during the final exam period. Exams cannot be made-up without prior notice to the instructor. Note that all students with exam grades below 60 will be asked to consult with the instructor. Final letter grades will be assigned based upon the point distribution with consideration of other aspects of performance, such as effort, participation, and improvement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 499. Dynamic Systems in Population and Community Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Vandermeer (jvander@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in calculus and Biol. 481. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will first cover classical notions of dynamic systems theory (e.g., Rayleigh's model of musical instruments, Duffing's non-linear oscillator, the Van der Pol oscillator, Poincaré's three-bodied problem) and elementary notions of dynamic systems in ecology (Lotka-Volterra-style equations of predation, competition, and mutualism, 1-D models of logistic and higher order maps). Second, the course will explore the more recent developments in dynamics, as applied to population and community ecology. Some of the topics include chaotic behavior of 1-D maps, strange attractors and chaotic behavior in classical systems, new analytical techniques for analyzing experimental data (e.g., Poincaré sections, Lyapunov exponents), pattern in chaotic systems. Each student is expected to develop a model of an ecological system and explore whatever complicated dynamics are contained therein.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 521. Bacterial Physiology II: Carbon Metabolism.

Section 001 This Course will Meet Oct. 10 Nov. 7. (Drop/Add deadline=October 16).

Instructor(s): Robert Bender (rbender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 305, and Biol. 310 or 311 or Biol. Chem. 415. (1).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on central metabolism especially the catabolism of glucose, lactose, and amino acids. Among the topics considered will be: (1) "The memory paradox" where bacterial cells remember how they were grown 40 generations ago in the absence of external reminder; (2) the integration of pathways and how changes in one effect the flow of another; and (3) global regulators (known and unknown) that integrate complex signals and transmit them into gene expression responses. Biochemistry shows that pathways exist, physiology asks the questions of how they function and why they are important. The key theme of the course will be regulation rather than memorizing pathways. Bacterial Physiology II is entirely independent of the related Bacterial Physiology I and III courses and can be taken without either of the others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 522. Bacterial Physiology III: Nitrogen Metabolism.

Section 001 This Course will Meet Nov. 9 Dec. 12. (Drop/Add deadline=November 15).

Instructor(s): Robert Bender (rbender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 305, and Biol 310, 311, or Biol. Chem 415. (1).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on the interconversion of various kinds of nitrogen sources. Topics will include the reduction of nitrate and atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia and the catabolism of urea and amino acids. Emphasis will be on the regulation of these pathways and the regulatory features that allow cells to use only the "appropriate" nitrogen sources to supply their needs. For example, how does a cell know to use the urea before porline as a nitrogen source (and ammonia before urea)? The key theme of the course will be regulation and the logical methods used to figure out how regulation functions. Bacterial Physiology III is entirely independent of the related Bacterial Physiology I and II courses and can be taken without either of the others. The course is intended for graduate students and upper class undergraduates with an interest in microbiology or biochemical regulation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 525/Chem. 525. Chemical Biology I.

Section 100.

Instructor(s): Nils Walter (nwalter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Chemistry 451, 452, 461, and 463. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Chemistry 525.100.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 601. Readings in Investigative Biology.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Biol. 608/Biophysics 608/Physics 608. Biophysical Principles of Microscopy.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Physics 405 and Graduate Standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Biophysics 608.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 615. Topics in Cellular and Molecular Biology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald Ellis (ronellis@umich.edu) , Mark Wilson (wilsonml@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 427 and 428; Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).May be repeated for a total of 6 credits

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Biol. 630/Hum. Gen. 630/Microbiol. 630/Pharmacol. 630/ Cell. & Mol. Bio. 630 Genetics Short Course.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Biol. 680/CMB 680/Path. 680/Physiology 680/Human Gen. 680/Neuro. 680/CDP 680. Organogenesis of a Complex Tissue Module I: Neural Crest.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sean Morrison (seanjm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate Cell biology recommended, but not required. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.med.umich.edu/medschool/organo/courses.html

This course topic consists of three 1 credit modules that may be elected individually for 1 credit each, or elected together for a total of three credits. These modules are coordinated by Dr. Deborah Gumucio, and consist of three four-week modules; each focused on one tissue or organ system.

  • Module 1 Organogenesis of the Gut.
  • Module 2 Organogenesis of the Neural Crest.
  • Module 3 Organogenesis of Skeletal Muscle.

Course objectives are:

  1. to provide students with a current, in-depth, multidisciplinary view of the processes of organogenesis and
  2. to highlight target areas of future research.

Lectures integrate several aspects of organogenesis, including: morphological and molecular events underlying organ formation; in vitro and in vivo systems for the study of these events; parallel pathways for organ formation in model organisms (fly, worm, fish, bird, mouse, and human); adult organ structure and pathology; organ regeneration or repair; stem cell systems; carcinogenesis; and artificial organ systems.

Each module will be team-taught by faculty with research and/or clinical expertise in the topic organ. Students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and "mini proposals" (one mini proposal per module).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 682/CMB 681/Hum. Gen. 681/Physiol. 681/CDB 681/Neuro. 68/ Path. 681 Organogenesis of a Complex Tissue Module II: Skeletal Muscle.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Faulkner (jafaulk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate Cell biology recommended, but not required. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.med.umich.edu/medschool/organo/courses.html

This course topic consists of three 1 credit modules that may be elected individually for 1 credit each, or elected together for a total of three credits. These modules are coordinated by Dr. Deborah Gumucio, and consist of three four-week modules; each focused on one tissue or organ system.

  • Module 1 Organogenesis of the Gut.
  • Module 2 Organogenesis of the Neural Crest.
  • Module 3 Organogenesis of Skeletal Muscle.

Course objectives are:

  1. to provide students with a current, in-depth, multidisciplinary view of the processes of organogenesis and
  2. to highlight target areas of future research.

Lectures integrate several aspects of organogenesis, including: morphological and molecular events underlying organ formation; in vitro and in vivo systems for the study of these events; parallel pathways for organ formation in model organisms (fly, worm, fish, bird, mouse, and human); adult organ structure and pathology; organ regeneration or repair; stem cell systems; carcinogenesis; and artificial organ systems.

Each module will be team-taught by faculty with research and/or clinical expertise in the topic organ. Students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and "mini proposals" (one mini proposal per module).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 683/CMB 682/Hum. Gen. 682/Path. 682/Physiol. 682 /Neuro. 682. Organogenesis of a Complex Tissue Module III: Gut.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Deb Gumucio

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate Cell Biology recommended, but not required. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.med.umich.edu/medschool/organo/courses.html

This course topic consists of three 1 credit modules that may be elected individually for 1 credit each, or elected together for a total of three credits. These modules are coordinated by Dr. Deborah Gumucio, and consist of three four-week modules; each focused on one tissue or organ system.

  • Module 1 Organogenesis of the Gut.
  • Module 2 Organogenesis of the Neural Crest.
  • Module 3 Organogenesis of Skeletal Muscle.

Course objectives are:

  1. to provide students with a current, in-depth, multidisciplinary view of the processes of organogenesis and
  2. to highlight target areas of future research.

Lectures integrate several aspects of organogenesis, including: morphological and molecular events underlying organ formation; in vitro and in vivo systems for the study of these events; parallel pathways for organ formation in model organisms (fly, worm, fish, bird, mouse, and human); adult organ structure and pathology; organ regeneration or repair; stem cell systems; carcinogenesis; and artificial organ systems.

Each module will be team-taught by faculty with research and/or clinical expertise in the topic organ. Students are evaluated on the basis of class participation and "mini proposals" (one mini proposal per module).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 685. Current Topics in Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology.

Section 001 Topic

Instructor(s): Brian Hazlett (bhazlett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Biol. 700. Advanced Study in Biology.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to research methods in biology, requiring examination of original literature, experimental work on the subject of investigation, and the writing of a report.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Biol. 730. Advanced Zoological Studies.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to the research methods in zoology requiring examination of original literature, experimental work on the subject of investigation, and writing of a report.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Biol. 755. Special Studies in Botany.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students who wish to carry on independent study in some specific discipline within the field of botany may elect this course. Each student must arrange with an appropriate faculty member to have his or her study supervised. An independent study project may involve library, laboratory, or field research or any combination of these.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Biol. 800. Biology Seminars.

Section 001 BIOLOGY DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Biol. 800. Biology Seminars.

Section 002 ADVANCED ICHTHYOLOGY.

Instructor(s): William Fink (wfink@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Biol. 800. Biology Seminars.

Section 003 BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY.

Instructor(s): Robert Payne (rbpayne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Biol. 800. Biology Seminars.

Section 004 BIOLOGY OF CHEMICAL MEDIATION.

Instructor(s): Robert Denver (rdenver@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Biol. 800. Biology Seminars.

Section 005 PLANT-ANIMAL INTERACTIONS.

Instructor(s): Beverly Rathcke (brathcke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Biol. 800. Biology Seminars.

Section 006 TOPICS IN DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROBIOLOGY.

Instructor(s): Richard Hume (rhume@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Biol. 800. Biology Seminars.

Section 007 MOLECULAR EVOLUTION.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Biol. 800. Biology Seminars.

Section 008 PLANT CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY SEMINAR.

Instructor(s): Jianming Li (jian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Biol. 800. Biology Seminars.

Section 009 MCDB PROSEMINAR.

Instructor(s): Rolf Bodmer (rolf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Biol. 800. Biology Seminars.

Section 010 Bacterial Physiology, I: Growth and Metabolism

Instructor(s): Robert Bender (rbender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio800/physiol.htm

The intended audience is PhD students who have a research interest in bacteria but who may not have had a recent upper-level microbiology course that was not pathogenesis based. The tentative list of topics will include bacterial growth, adaptations to changing environments, communication between the intracellular and extracellular worlds, and other topics chosen by the class.

Attendance:

Attendance is expected. If you miss two classes, you will write a 5-10 page review of some topic related to the course material from one of the missed sessions. If you miss three classes, you'll be asked to drop the course.

Paper:

You will write a short review on a topic to be chosen in consultation. We will talk about it a bit to make sure it is narrow enough to be possible without enormous strain. The paper is due on or before Nov. 29. If you turn it is early, I'll read it an comment on it. You can always turn it in again after revision, as long as it is before Nov. 29. The paper will be graded pass/fail/

Examination:

There will be a written exam on the last day of class. This will consist of 7-12 essay questions designed to test general knowledge, not specific details. Each question will be graded pass or fail. Pass on 70% of the questions = pass for the exam.

Grades:

The course is graded pass/fail. You must meet the attendance requirement, pass the paper, and pass the exam to pass the course.

Texts and Other Readings

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 801. Supervised Teaching.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Appointment as Teaching Assistant in Biology. (2; 1 credit for GSI Training course). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2; 1 credit for GSI Training course).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Seminars, demonstrations, and orientation for college teaching in biology. Available for all pre-candidate teaching assistants.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Biol. 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate Standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Biol. 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate Standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

This page was created at 7:50 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.


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