College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Economics (Division 358)

This page was created at 7:53 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Economics

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ECON

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Economics.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Economics this week go to What's New This Week.


Econ. 401. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephen Salant (ssalant@umich.edu), Kai-Uwe Kuhn (kukuhn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102, and Math. 115. (4).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/classes/Econ401_F00/

This course deals with the theoretical analysis of consumers, firms, markets, and price determination. The analysis is rigorous, using the tools of algebra, geometry, and elementary calculus in constructing models.

Prerequisites include one term of calculus. Economics 401 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is not recommended that 401 and 402 be taken in the same term. Lecture and discussion sections will both meet twice a week.

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Econ. 402. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Neil Buchanan

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102, and Math. 115. (4).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/classes/Econ402_F00/right.htm

This course in macroeconomics deals with the determination of broad economic aggregates such as national income, employment, the price level, and the balance of payments in both the short run and the long run. Rigorous analysis is used to understand the forces that determine these economic variables, and how they are affected by public policies.

Econ. 402 is predominantly a lecture course, with grades based on hour test(s), written exercises, and final exam. Economics 402 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in Economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is strongly recommended that students take Economics 401 before 402.

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Econ. 404. Statistics for Economists.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 100.

Instructor(s): E. Philip Howrey (eph@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102 and Math. 115. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Econ. 405 or Stat. 250, 265, 311, 402, 405, or 412. (4).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides an introduction to descriptive statistics, probability theory, statistical inference, and regression analysis. There are two lectures and one problem session per week. Grades are based on problem sets and exams. The course, which is self-contained, does not serve as a prerequisite to Economics 406.

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Econ. 404. Statistics for Economists.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 200.

Instructor(s): Stanley Sedo (sasedo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102 and Math. 115. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Econ. 405 or Stat. 250, 265, 311, 402, 405, or 412. (4).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Economics 404 is an introduction to Statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, statistical inference and an introduction to regression analysis. Grades are determined by problem sets and exams. There are two lectures and one problem set per week. The course is self-contained and does not serve as a prerequisite to Economics 406.

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Econ. 405/Stat. 405. Introduction to Statistics.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lutz Kilian (lkilian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 116 or 118. Juniors and seniors may elect this course concurrently with Econ. 101 or 102. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Stat. 265, 311, or 412. Students with credit for Econ. 404 can only elect Econ. 405 for 2 credits and must have permission of instructor. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for economics concentrators but is sufficiently general to serve noneconomics concentrators as well. The emphasis is on understanding rather than on "cookbook" applications. Students are expected to know basic algebra and basic calculus. Since the course emphasizes the foundations of statistical inference, it is recommended that after finishing the course students elect Economics 406 or a similar course in the Statistics department to gain experience with applications and computational methods.

This course is designed for quantitatively oriented students who are comfortable with abstract concepts and mathematical techniques. Students who prefer a broader, less rigorous approach to statistics should elect Econ. 404. Evaluation of students in the course is based on examinations and homework assignments. There are three hours of lectures and one hour of discussion per week. 405 is a prerequisite for 406 (Econometrics).

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Econ. 409. Game Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ennio Stacchetti (ennio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 217. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will consist of an introduction to the subject of game theory. Game theory has become an important technique for studying competitive and cooperative phenomena in economics and the social sciences. Traditional economics emphasizes the two extremes of economic decision-making: perfect competition, in which no firm can affect market prices, and pure monopoly, in which one firm has complete price-setting power. Game theory is a technique which allows intermediate situations to be analyzed: for example, those that arise during wage negotiations or in price wars between two large firms. The same principles that govern the strategic interaction of players in parlor games like Chess or Poker turn out to be widely applicable to a whole range of such phenomena in economics, biology, and political science. The current course will explore the beginnings of the subject using simple illustrative examples. Some calculus and matrix algebra will be needed, but the mathematical requirement is more for some sophistication in methods of argumentation rather than for specific techniques.

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Econ. 412. Topics in Macroeconomics.

Monetary and Financial Economics

Section 001 Economic Growth.

Instructor(s): Dmitriy Stolyarov (stolyar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 402. (3).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an advanced undergraduate course in macroeconomic theory with the focus on economic growth. The standard of living in a country is determined by its capacity to produce goods and services. Why are some nations richer than others? Why is there economic growth? Will it continue forever? What factors play a role in shaping the economic success of a nation? We will study the key ideas and insights of modern growth theory and apply them to explain the facts from the history of technology, economic performance of the world and growth experience of different nations. Material is cumulative and math-intensive. Course requirements: two exams, homeworks.

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Econ. 431. Industrial Organization and Performance.

Industrial Organization and Public Control

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Illoong Kwon (ilkwon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401. (3).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/econ/431/001.nsf

This course will analyze the strategic interactions among firms and their effects on the social welfare. The topics will include the price discrimination, price/quantity competition, collusion, merger, entry deterrence, and antitrust laws. Selected news articles and antitrust cases will be used to illustrate some of the key concepts. Students should be prepared to participate frequently in class discussions.

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Econ. 432. Government Regulation of Industry.

Industrial Organization and Public Control

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kai-Uwe Kuhn (kukuhn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401. (3).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/econ/432/001.nsf

This course describes and analyzes the efforts of governments to control the market power of business enterprises. Topics include dominant position, oligopolistic cooperation, vertical restraint, and merger. Emphasis is placed on American policies, especially antitrust law and regulation by administrative commission. Economics 431 is not required. Students should be prepared to participate frequently in class discussions.

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ECON 432. Government Regulation of Industry.

Industrial Organization and Public Control

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kai-Uwe Kuhn (kukuhn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401. (3). Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is primarily about anti-trust policy but also deals with some issues of regulation in markets with natural monopoly. The course has two elements: Students learn rigorous industrial organization theory as relevant to issues of anti-trust and economic regulation. (e.g., Collusion, Information exchange, predatory pricing, exclusionary practices, etc.). This knowledge is then applied to some landmark US and European anti-trust cases (e.g., the recent anti-trust action against Microsoft). All students will have to participate in presenting one of the cases.

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Econ. 435. Financial Economics.

Monetary and Financial Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Patrick Rowland (proland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401 and 405. (4).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/econ/435/001.nsf

The financial economics course provides the student with an examination of a wide array of financial instruments and institutions in today's global marketplace. In taking this course, you will develop an understanding of the numerous money-market and capital market instruments and rates, the determinants of equity and bond values, and the workings of various financial markets. Financial derivatives, specifically futures and options, are introduced and their relationship to portfolio management and hedging strategy is analyzed.

The course introduces the Capital Asset Pricing Model, Markowitz diversification, duration and bond portfolio management, and the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. As part of the coursework, you will apply the concepts presented in class and investigate the fundamental components that determine the value of major U.S. corporations.

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Econ. 453. The European Economy.

Comparative Economic Systems and National Economies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jim Adams (jimadams@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401. (4).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The structure, function, and performance of the European economy since World War II. Emphasis is placed on description and analysis of European economic integration. Topics include the origins and institutions of the European Community, creation of the customs union, unification of the internal market, implementation of common policies for agriculture and competition, prospects for monetary union, and progress toward social Europe. Students should be prepared to participate frequently in class discussions. Students who miss the first two days of class without permission will be dropped automatically from class.

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Econ. 454. Economics of Japan.

Comparative Economic Systems and National Economies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary Saxonhouse (grsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102. (3).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Analysis of Japan's economic organization, structure, and performance. Special emphasis is placed on the character of the Japanese financial system, the behavior of Japanese enterprises, the Japanese labor force, and the Japanese household. There will also be ample discussion of Japan's international economic relations. Attention will be given to bilateral and multilateral conflicts in overseas product, financial, and technology markets. The class has a lecture format, but questions are welcomed. Course grade will be determined by two one-hour exams and a final.

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Econ. 461. The Economics of Development I.

Economic Development

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rohini Somanathan (rohinis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 360. (3).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to questions related to the economic development of countries. The term "economic development" is very broad and we will consider a number of aspects of such development. We will examine the factors that account for differences in per capita income across countries, the characteristics of traditional societies that are conductive to growth and modernization and the relationship between growth, income distribution and other indices of development such as health and education. We will also ask how property rights and institutions influence technological change in different sectors of the economy and how social norms and networks in traditional societies can help resolve contractual problems associated with development. Methodologically, the course will be a mixture of mathematical models and empirical studies. Intermediate microeconomics is the only prerequisite.

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Econ. 472. Intermediate Natural Resource Economics.

Environmental Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephen Salant (ssalant@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401 or NR&E 570. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/econ/472/001.nsf

This course explains the conceptual framework used by economists to analyze the usage over time of replenishable resources (such as water, trees, fish, and wildlife) and nonreplenishable resources (such as oil or minerals). For each of these resources, increased consumption today inevitably has future consequences. The course therefore emphasizes the theory of intertemporal choice. Comparisons will be made between the market outcome when self-interested agents interact over time and the efficient (surplus-maximizing) intertemporal exploitation of the resources. The courses presumes familiarity with elementary probability, calculus, and static microtheory at the level of Economics 401 or equivalent. Grades will be based on hour test(s), problem sets, and a final exam.

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Econ. 483/Poli. Sci. 482. Positive Political Economy.

Other Topics in Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yan Chen (yanchen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~yanchen/econ483/econ483.html

This course is an introduction to game theory and its application in political science. Fundamental solution concepts in game theory are first introduced by classroom experiments, then by rigorous mathematical analysis. Voting, legislative rules, bargaining, and other political processes will be modeled and analyzed using game theory.

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Econ. 494/Hist. 494. Topics in Economic History.

Economic History

Section 001 Economic History of Japan

Instructor(s): Gary Saxonhouse (grsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the development of the Japanese economy during the 800 years preceding 1945. Particular emphasis will be placed on the structural changes occurring during the Tokugawa and early Meiji periods as well as on developments during the first half of the twentieth century. The course will explore how, when, and why Japan's economic performance came to be markedly distinctive from the rest of Asia. Economics 494 cannot be enrolled in for credit if Economics 454 has been taken previously for credit. This academic term, however, it can be taken simultaneously for credit with Economics 454. This course has a lecture format, but questions are welcomed. Grades will be determined by two one hour exams and a final exam.

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Econ. 496. History of Economic Thought.

Economic History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102. (3).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~ntchung/496.html

This course provides an overview of the development of economics from the origins of modern capitalism to the present. The aim of the course is to deepen understanding of contemporary economic questions by situating them in the context of how such questions have arisen and been debated in the history of economic thought. Topics include: (1) Classical political economy from Adam Smith through Karl Marx; (2) Neoclassical economics from Jevons, Menger, and Walras through Marshall and his followers; (3) Keynesian economics and the neoclassical synthesis; (4) more recent New Classical, New Keynesian, Post Keynesian, and neomarxist developments. Economic theory will be situated in the broader historical contexts in which they developed. Attention will be focused on the scientific status of economic theories as well as their relation to policy and normative considerations.

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Econ. 499. Independent Research.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of staff member supervising research, and permission of the economics concentration advisor. (1-4).No more than four credits may be used in an economics concentration program. Rackham credit requires additional work. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Student and instructor agree on a substantial piece of work involving reading or research. Evaluation is based on the written work, either papers or examinations.

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Econ. 501. Microeconomic Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001

Instructor(s): John Cross (jcross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401. (3).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/econ/501/001.nsf

This is a course in the applications of microeconomic theory to public policy issues. Its purpose and goal is not only to review formal price theory, but to demonstrate, by example, how economists set up and analyze public policy problems.

The course is constructed around a series of "cases." Each case will be treated in a two-lecture unit, with each unit focusing upon a group of related problems. The first portion of a unit will provide reviews and extensions of theoretical materials that are most often used to analyze the issues, while the second will deal more specifically with the case problem itself.

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Econ. 541/Public Policy 541. International Trade Policy.

International Economics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Alan Deardorff (alandear@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~alandear/courses/541/541.html

No Description Provided

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Econ. 553. Quantitative Methods.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Dmitriy Stolyarov (stolyar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a one-term introduction to the use of mathematical methods in economics. Topics include differentiation and integration, solutions of systems of equations, difference and differential equations, and probability theory. Application of the techniques to practical problems in economics is stressed.

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Econ. 555/Public Policy 555. Microeconomics.

Other Topics in Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carl Simon (cpsimon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Public Policy Studies 555.001.

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Econ. 573/Public Policy 573. Benefit-Cost Analysis.

Other Topics in Economics

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kerwin Charles (kcharles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 555. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Public Policy Studies 573.001.

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Econ. 599. Special Tutorial.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Econ. 600. Math for Economists.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Emre Ozdenoren (emreo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Instructor permission. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/econ/600/001.nsf

No Description Provided

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Econ. 601. Microeconomic Theory I.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001 * MEETS SEPT 1ST-OCT 16.

Instructor(s): Lones Smith (ennio@umich.edu), Emre Ozdenoren (emreo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ 600. Graduate standing. (1.5).

Credits: (1.5).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/econ/601/001.nsf

The first required microeconomic theory course for doctoral students. Topics include, theory of the consumer, aggregate demand, theory of the firm, general equilibrium and uncertainty. Students are expected to be comfortable with multi-variable calculus including optimization as well as to follow and replicate simple proofs involving basic algebra and logic.

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Econ. 602. Microeconomic Theory II.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001 MEETS OCT. 18-DEC. 11

Instructor(s): Lones Smith (lones@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ 600, 601. Graduate standing. (1.5).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1.5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The first required macroeconomic theory course for doctoral students. Begins with an overview of aggregate income determination. Continues with an in-depth treatment of economic growth: the Solow, neoclassical, and new growth models. Proceeds with introduction of rational expectations models and techniques with application n to output determination and price adjustment in closed and open economies.

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Econ. 607. Macroeconomic Theory II.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Susanto Basu (sbasu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ 600. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Econ. 611. Stabilization Policy.

Other Topics in Economics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Susanto Basu (sbasu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 602 and 604; 611. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course deals with recent developments in macroeconomic theory. Particular attention is given to the application of the techniques of optimal control to Real and New Keynesian business cycle theory. Other likely topics include New Keynesian foundations, imperfect competition macroeconomics, q-theory, monetary and financial theory, growth theory, efficiency wages, Ricardian equivalence, precautionary saving, and Stochastic optimization. Prerequisites: Econ. 602, 603 and 604. Econ 611 and Econ 612 can be taken in either order.

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Econ. 617. Advanced Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 609. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Econ. 621. Labor Economics I.

Labor Economics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Gary Solon

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 601, 603, 673, 674. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Develops theoretical models of the labor market, presents related empirical research, and discusses policy application. Topics include labor supply, labor demand, market equilibrium and compensating wage differentials, investment in human capital, and cyclical unemployment.

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Econ. 631. Industrial Organizations and Public Policy.

Industrial Organization and Public Control

Section 001

Instructor(s): Illoong Kwon (ilkwon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 601 and 603 and Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The focus of this course is on theoretical analysis of behavior in markets. The main emphasis is on how firms compete with one another, and secondary emphasis is placed on organizational behavior and how firms interact with consumers. In recent years topics have included: price discrimination, oligopoly theory with and without differentiated products, strategic trade, mergers, markets with imperfectly informed participants, entry deterrence, predation, collusive behavior, cartel behavior, research and development competition, and the sale or rental of durable goods. Non-cooperative game theory is the predominant tool of analysis and is developed as needed during the course.

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Econ. 641. International Trade Theory.

International Economics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Alan Deardorff (alandear@umich.edu) , Gordon Hanson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 601 and 603. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~alandear/courses/641/641.description.html

This course deals with the microeconomic aspects of international economics. Specific topics covered include theories of international specialization and exchange, trade policy and economic welfare, international factor movement, trade and growth, under both perfect competition and imperfect competition, and selected problems of trade policy in the international trading system. For most topics, both theoretical and empirical results from the literature are examined.

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Econ. 661/NR&E 668. Advanced Natural Resources Economics.

Monetary and Financial Economics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Gloria Helfand (ghelfand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 501 or 601, 653 and 654; and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course reviews the literature on the pricing of natural resources (agricultural goods, renewable and nonrenewable resources and durables) over time. The first half of the course considers resources which are privately owned; the second half considers resources that are common property. Policies analyzed include: bufferstocks used to affect prices (ceilings, floors, bands, and pegs); bans, embargoes, price controls and whatever else is timely or of interest to participants. To simplify the mathematics, discrete-time methods are used predominately.

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Econ. 662/NR&E 669. Environmental Economics.

Environmental Economics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Gloria Helfand

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 501or 603, 653. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In the presence of pollution externalities, market allocations are typically inefficient and corrective government regulation may be desirable. This course first reviews solutions favored by economists, namely Pigovian taxes, tradable pollution permits, and judicial remedies, but then points out various real-world informational, technological, and political constraints that make such solutions difficult or impossible to implement in practice. The course then focuses on optimal interventions in the presence of these real-world constraints. Topics discussed are likely to include (1) optimal regulation when firms possess more information about compliance costs than regulators; (2) optimal enforcement of regulations when monitoring is costly; (3) non-market methods of measuring environmental and resource values; and (4) the interrelationship of environmental issues and international trade.

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Econ. 665. Economic Development of Underdeveloped Countries.

Economic Development

Section 001

Instructor(s): Albert Park (alpark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines microeconomic issues in economic development, focusing on modeling approaches and empirical applications. Topics include household decision-making, including risk-coping strategies, technology adoption, migration, intra-household economics, and health and nutrition; and rural institutions such as sharecropping, interlinked contracts, land tenure arrangements, group-lending and rotating credit schemes, and public employment projects for the poor.

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Econ. 673/Stat. 505. Econometric Analysis.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Lutz Kilian (lkilian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Statistics 505.001.

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Econ. 675. Applied Econometrics.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Lee Lillard (llillard@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Economics 674. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/econ/675/001.nsf

The purposes of this course are (1) to discuss types of econometric models likely to be useful in dissertation (and subsequent) research and (2) to provide some practical experience in the specification and estimation of econometric models. Topics vary from year to year, but recently have included dynamic time series models, methods for longitudinal analysis, and models for qualitative and limited dependent variables.

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Econ. 684. Government Revenues.

Public Finance

Section 001

Instructor(s): Roger Gordon (rgordon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 601. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Provides a positive and normative analysis of alternative government revenue sources. The first part of the course explores theoretical analyses of the incidence, efficiency costs, and distributional effects, of alternative tax systems. The rest of the course examines the implications of existing tax law in the U.S., and commonly proposed revisions in the law, for the allocation of resources in the economy.

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Econ. 695. Introduction to Economic Research I.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Section 001

Instructor(s): Robert Barksy (barsky@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce third-year students to "how to do economic research." Students will be required to produce a polished research paper by the end of the course which can be incorporated into their thesis. Some class time will focus on topics such as bibliographic methods, data analysis, and economic modeling, but most of the effort will be involved in writing the research paper.

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Econ. 695. Introduction to Economic Research I.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Section 002

Instructor(s): Lones Smith (lones@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce third-year students to "how to do economic research." Students will be required to produce a polished research paper by the end of the course which can be incorporated into their thesis. Some class time will focus on topics such as bibliographic methods, data analysis, and economic modeling, but most of the effort will be involved in writing the research paper.

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Econ. 695. Introduction to Economic Research I.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Section 003

Instructor(s): Michelle White (micwhite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce third-year students to "how to do economic research." Students will be required to produce a polished research paper by the end of the course which can be incorporated into their thesis. Some class time will focus on topics such as bibliographic methods, data analysis, and economic modeling, but most of the effort will be involved in writing the research paper.

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Econ. 700. Research.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of graduate advisor. Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Econ. 711. Seminar in Monetary Theory and Macroeconomics Policy.

Other Topics in Economics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Robert Barksy (barsky@umich.edu) , Matthew Shapiro (shapiro@umich.edu), Dmitriy Stolyarov

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~shapiro/seminar/macro.html

No Description Provided

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Econ. 721. Seminar in Labor Economics.

Labor Economics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Charles Brown (charlieb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Econ. 731. Seminar in Public Policy in Business.

Industrial Organization and Public Control

Section 001

Instructor(s): Kai-Uwe Kuhn (kukuhn@umich.edu), Illoong Kwon (ilkwon@umich.edu) , James Levinsohn (jamesl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~jamesl/mellon/spp731.html

No Description Provided

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ECON 739/Public Policy 747. Topics in International Economic Policy.

International Economics

Section 001 The International Monetary System: Problems and Proposals for Reform. (2 credits). Meets Sept. 8 Oct. 13 (Drop/Add deadline=September 26).

Instructor(s): Robert Stern (rmstern@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Economics/ SPP 540. Graduate standing. (2-4). May be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rmstern/section1/747info.htm

See Public Policy Studies 747..

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ECON 739/Public Policy 747. Topics in International Economic Policy.

International Economics

Section 002 Issues in the WTO-2000 Multilateral Trade Negotiations (2 credits). Meets Oct. 20 Dec. 8. (Drop/Add deadline=November 2).

Instructor(s): Robert Stern (rmstern@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Economics/ SPP 540. Graduate standing. (2-4). May be repeated for credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rmstern/section2/747info2.htm

See Public Policy Studies 747..

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Econ. 751. Advanced Price Theory.

Monetary and Financial Economics

Section 001

Prerequisites & Distribution: "Econ. 601, 603, 653, 654 or equivalents." Graduate standing. (3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Econ. 759. Seminar in Comparative Economic Systems.

Comparative Economic Systems and National Economies

Section 001 Historical Process of the Post-Socialist Transition and Economic Development

Instructor(s): Albert Park (alpark@umich.edu), Rohini Somanathan (rohinis@umich.edu), Jim Adams

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course offers an overall survey of various issues and approaches to the historical process of the post-socialist transition and economic development. It consists of six parts:

  1. the origin of socialism;
  2. theoretical and empirical analysis of the former socialist systems
  3. major tasks of transition and reform measures
  4. transition as a process of economic development
  5. transition as a large scale institutional change
  6. recent country experience of transition.
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Econ. 775/Stat. 575. Econometric Theory I.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Shinichi Sakata (ssakata@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 673, 674 and 653, 654. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~ssakata/seminar/schedule.html

See Statistics 775.001.

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Econ. 781. Seminar in Public Finance.

Public Finance

Section 001

Instructor(s): Roger Gordon (rgordon@umich.edu) , Yan Chen (yanchen@umich.edu) , Michelle White (micwhite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Econ. 825/Hist. 825/Anthro. 825/Chinese 825/Pol. Sci. 825/Soc. 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Economic History

Prerequisites & Distribution: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 825.001.

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Econ. 835. Seminar in Natural Resource Economics.

Environmental Economics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Stephen Salant (ssalant@umich.edu), Klaas Van't Veld

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Econ. 841. Research Seminar in International Economics.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Instructor(s): Linda Tesar , Alan Deardorff (alandear@umich.edu) , Gordon Hanson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.spp.umich.edu/rsie/seminar/schedule.html

The Research Seminar in International Economics is a University of Michigan center that is operated jointly by the School of Public Policy and the Department of Economics. It was founded by Professor Robert M. Stern in the Department of Economics in 1963. It has been distributing discussion papers since 1968, and it became affiliated with the School of Public Policy in 1980. The activities of the Research Seminar include a weekly seminar or workshop, an ongoing program of faculty and graduate student research, linkages with developing country institutions, conferences involving academics and policy makers, training of graduate students specializing in international economics and international economic law, and the distribution of a series of RSIE Discussion Papers.

Co-directors of the Research Seminar are Alan V. Deardorff, James A. Levinsohn, and Robert M. Stern, Professor, Associate Professor and Professor, respectively, of Economics and Public Policy. Other core faculty include: Drusilla K. Brown (Tufts University); John H. Jackson (Law), Lutz Kilian (Economics), and Gary Saxonhouse (Economics). Several additional faculty members from Economics, Business Administration, and Public Policy also participate actively in the Research Seminar. The Research Seminar is administered by the School of Public Policy and is located on the fourth floor of Lorch Hall, the building that also houses the Department of Economics.

Faculty research currently in progress under the auspices of the Research Seminar includes such topics as: the future of the multilateral trading system; preferential trading arrangements; econometric analysis of trade and trade policies; international taxation, international finance, and international corporate behavior; economic reform and transition; international economic law and policy; and international political economy.

Research results are reported initially in the form of Discussion Papers. For almost thirty years, these have been circulated periodically to about 200 specialists in international economics and to government and international agencies and institutions. More recent discussion papers are available for viewing and downloading here on the World Wide Web.

In 1989, a series of Studies in International Economic Policy was established under the auspices of the University of Michigan Press. Professor Stern is the General Editor of the series.
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Econ. 851. Advanced Economic Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 001

Instructor(s): Lones Smith (lones@umich.edu) , Ennio Stacchetti (ennio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~lones/seminar.html

No Description Provided

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Econ. 864. Seminar in Economic History.

Economic History

Section 001

Instructor(s): Warren Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Econ. 875. Research Seminar in Quantitative Economics.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Instructor(s): Lutz Kilian (lkilian@umich.edu) , Shinichi Sakata (ssakata@umich.edu), Hahn

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 673, 674. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~ssakata/seminar/

No Description Provided

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Econ. 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

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Econ. 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Honors Program, Internships, Seminars, and Independent Research

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

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