College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in English (Division 361)

This page was created at 8:10 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 – December 22)

Open courses in English

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for English.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in English this week go to What's New This Week.


Engl. 406/Ling. 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an advanced survey of descriptive English grammar. We will look closely at the formal and semantic motivations for basic grammatical categories and processes in English (words, phrases, clauses, and sentences) and we will discuss how these structures contribute to the expressive potential of the system. There will be daily practice in grammatical parsing, weekly quizzes, and a final exam. The course should be attractive to those professionally interested in English education, practical criticism, or further work in linguistic theory – as well as those generally interested in becoming more articulate about the structure of our language. Texts: Randolph Quirk and Sidney Greenbaum, A Student's Grammar of the English Language and John Algeo, Exercises in Contemporary English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 – Reading Old English. Meets with English 501.001. Meets the PRE-1600 English concentration requirement.

Instructor(s): Thomas Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the earliest texts written in English over a thousand years ago. We will begin with Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings – the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the first object of this class will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. We will conclude with the study of the later texts which continue the Anglo-Saxon tradition alliterative tradition. My chief aim is to help you develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 412/Film-Video 412. Major Directors.

Section 001 – American Comic Masters Since the 60's: Allen, Brooks, Edwards, and Ashby. Meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Peter Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: F/V 230 or 236. (3). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for a total of nine credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 412.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 [includes cost of film pass.] Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 – Research and Technology in the Humanities. Meets with English 516.001.

Instructor(s): Eric Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lsarth/RTHf00/415f00syl.html

This upperclass and graduate-level course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities, both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., Web sites and CD-ROMs). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that question the impacts of technology. By the middle of the academic term, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include at least information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, the meaning of the digital revolution, text analysis, and image manipulation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 005 – Television and Literature: Intersections of Substance, Style and Social Commentary

Instructor(s): Barbra Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

English 415

Television and Literature: Intersections of Substance, Style, and Social Commentary

The continuing dynamic role of television in our lives, as a purveyor of culturally significant narratives, results, in part, from the medium's unique properties and from creative producers' resistance to affixing relevant boundaries upon texts, ever-energized, of course, by television's habitual, multiple relationships to viewers. Conventional arguments about whether television is a visual or verbal medium are rendered relatively inconsequential in the face of more intriguing questions of its attractions for and effects upon viewers, as it collapses distinctions between fiction and fact, intimacy and distance, unreality and reality, time present and time past, narration and illustration, attribution and allusion, imaginative invention and authentic action. We investigate such matters cross-disciplinarily and inter-textually, looking into correspondences and differences between significations and significances in popular novels and broadcast texts. We mine two powerful story-telling media, television and print, for whatever intriguing issues, ideas, and meanings that we as cultural spectators and participants might uncover in them: The Sopranos (HBO/TV) and Excellent Cadavers (novel); The Practice (ABC/TV) and The Client (novel); Sex and the City (HBO/TV) and Madame Bovary (as novel and TV 2000 adaptation), and so on. We apply appropriate theories and critical lenses to deciphering and interpreting form, content, and quality. First, we begin by analyzing narrative techniques unique to live televised sports text and, then, tackle comparative evaluations of compelling storytelling functions and techniques as they appear in several popular genres, on screen and in print.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 006 – Introduction to Fantastic Literature. Meets with Comparative Literature 430.002.

Instructor(s): Tobin Siebers

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Comparative Literature 430.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 427/Theatre 427. Advanced Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): OyamO (oyamo@umich.edu) , Oyamo (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 327. Permission of instructor. (3).May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 427.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 002 – Mapping the Moment

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of instructor is required. (3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will attempt to isolate the moment, the purest form of the moment, understanding that the moment simutaneously encompasses the events that we experience, events that we remember, events about which we are completely unaware, as well as events that could have happened or that happened only in imagination or dream. Every moment encompasses both the macroscopic and microscopic whether or not we are personally engaged with all of the moment's components. How marvelous and daunting, then is the task of writing accurately about just one moment. Your task for this class will be to isolate and write with accuracy about just one moment. We will celebrate the fullness of the moment by mapping as much of one moment as is possible in a single term. A poem of substantial revision will be due weekly. Progress and problems in mapping the moment will be addressed in our online forum. Two texts: Powers of Ten and Open Closed Open.

All students admitted into the English Creative Writing Subconcentration can be issued a permission to enroll (overide). All other students should waitlist and submit their portfolio to the English Department Main Office, 3187 Angell Hall, before the first day of class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Permission of instructor

Engl. 430. The Rise of the Novel.

Section 001 – Meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): David Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The success of the novel as a popular literary genre tends to obscure the fact that it is a fairly recent innovation. In this course we will survey the first century of the novel's development in Britain, reading path-breaking works by such writers as Haywood, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, Lewis, and Austen. What distinguishes the novel, we will ask, from other literary forms, and why did this genre take hold when it did? What were the chief concerns, whether social, moral, or aesthetic, of novelists writing in the eighteenth century, and how did these evolve over the course of the period? Finally, how do the best-sellers of eighteenth-century fiction reflect and contribute to conditions of daily life and thought at the time? Assignments include an oral presentation, two essays, and a final. Students will have the option of substituting for certain of these assignments an original group web project on some aspect of eighteenth-century culture to be included as part of the Eighteenth-Century England web site (http://www.umich.edu/~ece/).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 431. The Victorian Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Many issues that concern us today really took flight in the Victorian period – issues of class, gender, sexuality, politics, popular culture, family life, and more. And the period's most characteristic literary form, the novel, provides a hugely entertaining and suggestive way of thinking about these issues then and now. In this course we explore the pleasures of reading Victorian novels – they were, in effect, the popular miniseries of their day – and enrich our understanding of these novels by keeping an eye to their relevant social contexts. Our primary emphasis goes to canonical authors such as the Brontës, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. But we also explore the formation of canonical value by looking to one or two texts from less traditionally celebrated authors. Coursework includes three papers, a presentation, and a reading journal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 432. The American Novel.

Section 001 – This course meets the American Literature requirement.

Instructor(s): Xavier Nicholas

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a critical study of the American novel of the past two centuries. Its purpose is to explore the richness and diversity of the American experience in terms of how that experience has been defined, ordered, and artistically transformed through the American novel. Nine major novels will be read in depth, analyzing them as works of art, probing their political ideas, examining their relation to their time and place, and observing their connections with each other. The works will be studied as reflections of the American artistic and cultural tradition, with a view toward sharpening students' understanding of the relationship between American verbal art and American culture.

Course Requirements:

  1. Attendance at all lectures and discussion sessions.
  2. Reading and participation in discussion of all assigned texts.
  3. Seven informal, one page discussion pages on assigned topics handed in during the academic term.
  4. Two formal, critical papers, five pages in length, on assigned topics.
  5. Midterm and Final Examinations.

Texts: Available at Shaman Drum Bookstore.

  • The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Billy Budd, Herman Melville
  • The House of Mirth, Edith Wharton
  • The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • The Sun Also Rises, Ernest Hemingway
  • Light in August, William Faulkner
  • Ceremony, Leslie Silko
  • Meridian, Alice Walker
  • Beloved, Toni Morrison.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jen Shelton (sheltonj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Our studies of the modern novel will be centered on Joyce's Ulysses, which likely will occupy the greater part of both our class time and our energy. To contextualize this difficult and important work, we'll read a selection of other texts published within approximately 10 years of its publication date, 1922. These texts will include Passage to India, Women in Love , Mrs. Dalloway, Plum Bun, and The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, a selection that will allow us to consider a variety of modes of modernist experiment. Students should expect to complete at least 30 pages of formal writing (including revision) which will be divided between an essay on Ulysses, written in stages, and an essay on at least one of the other texts for the course. Every student will also participate in an online discussion group designed to help us get the most from our classroom meeting time. A final exam will help students assemble and codify the knowledge gained during the semester. All students should (re)read Alice in Wonderland (both parts – Alice's Adventures and Looking-Glass ) before the first class and bring your book, any edition, to our first meeting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 440. Modern Poetry.

Section 001 – Meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Laurence Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we shall study the major poetry in English of the period 1900-1940. Our principal subject matter will be work by the most important poets – Thomas Hardy, W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, D. H. Lawrence, H.D., W.C. Williams, Marianne Moore, Robert Frost, Hart Crane, Wallace Stevens – but we will also devote some time to special topics like Imagism, the poetry of The Great War, and the Harlem Renaissance, as well as to the social, historical, and literary backgrounds of modern poetry. The objective of the course is a clear understanding of the techniques and themes of modern poetry, which are especially significant because they continue to influence and inform the poetry of our own time. The format is lecture and discussion. Requirements include two papers, a midterm, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 445. Shakespeare's Rivals.

Section 001 – Of Loneliness and Lies: The Performance of Authenticity in Early Modern England. A Renaissance Drama Course. This course satisfies the PRE-1830 English Concentration requirement.

Instructor(s): Carla Mazzio (mazzio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What might it mean, in the realm of the early modern theater, to "act" shy, to seem genuine, to feel alone (on stage), to think aloud, to stage voyeurism, to insist – dramatically – on one's authenticity? Exploring a range of Renaissance dramas of yearning, deception, and loss, this course will examine, complicate, and historicize notions of interiority, authenticity, individuality, character, and personhood as they emerge on the early modern stage. By exploring critical vocabularies and theatrical modes of representing the insides of persons, we will consider the relationships between structures of affect and structures of theater, and work to develop a critical lexicon and analytic framework for discussing aspects of aloneness, selfhood, and authenticity in dramatic literature.

This course will have weekly writing assignments (2-3 pages) and reading quizzes; a midterm and final exam, a midterm paper (5-7 pages) and a longer final paper with a research component. This course is designed as a discussion course, so informed class participation is one of the most important requirements. The readings will include a range of Renaissance (mostly tragic) dramas and a range of primary and secondary readings each week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 449/Theatre 423. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bert Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 449.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 450. Medieval Drama.

Section 001 – Sex and Religion in Medieval Drama. This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for Englishconcentrators.

Instructor(s): Terry Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the varieties of medieval and early renaissance drama: ribald comedies, serious religious dramas, and combinations of the two. We will read many plays, and since plays exist partly in their production, we will watch modern productions of some plays and attempt to determine how they change our interpretations. Throughout the term, we will also try producing parts of plays to learn about how they were staged in their time, how special effects were achieved, and how performance can alter audience perceptions. This course will require active participation in group efforts and discussions, some guided research, two short essays incorporating the research, and a final exam (the format of which will be decided by the class).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 462. Victorian Literature.

Section 001 – Women in Victorian England.

Instructor(s): J Early

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines multiple genres – nonfiction, fiction, and poetry –by and about Victorian women to consider the Victorian "Condition of England" debate by re-centering it in the hotly debated issue known as 'The Woman Question". Both men and women writers worked within and against the constraints of science, law, religion, and culture to consider "woman's nature", woman's role, and the relation of those constructions to Victorian culture. The debate is richly varied with some of the most influential entries to it appearing in fictional representations of women and reviewer" responses to them. The diverse literature reflects often complex positions, inflected by gender, class, and race that confound attempts to place easy 20th century templates over this central Victorian discourse. We will work toward understanding how the Victorians represented, defined and understood the issues. We will read work by major and less well-known writers, primarily but not exclusively women. We will read three or four novels, selected from Eliot (Middlemarch or Mill on the Floss ); Brontë, (Jane Eyre or Villette), Thackery, (Vanity Fair), Braddon (Lady Audley's Secret ),; poetry by E.B. Browning, C. Rossetti, D.G. Rossetti, Tennyson, and others; essays by J.S. Mill, Cobbe, Oliphant, and others; short stories and ghost stories by assorted writers. Written work will include three papers and an exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 469. Milton.

Section 001 – This course satifies the PRE-1830 English concentration requirement.

Instructor(s): Michael Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course fulfills the Pre-1830 requirement.

This course will be devoted to close reading of the works of John Milton, England's greatest epic poet. We will read some of the early poetry and prose, but the lion's share of our attention will be devoted to Samson Agonistes, Milton's closet drama of sexual and political treachery, and to Paradise Lost, Milton's retelling of the central Judeo-Christian myth about the origin of evil in the world. We will be particularly interested in the relationship between Milton's own career as a political revolutionary and his portrait of Satan's rebellion against God, and in his account of the origin of social and sexual difference. Requirements include attendance and participation, 2 five-page essays, a midterm, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 470. Early American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 – American Literature to 1830. Meets the Pre-1830 and American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Scottie Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will offer you a broad introduction to the literature of North America from the first Spanish contacts through the period of the Early Republic. We will read, for example, the impassioned theological expressions of New England, narratives of captivity, conversion, and enslavement that emerged from the often violent crossing of cultures and races throughout the colonies, seduction novels by women, and the foundational documents surrounding the Revolution. My interest lies not in defining an American form or story, but in asking why certain forms emerged or were invoked and altered in response to unique historical situations. As texts which you discover yourself are often the most compelling, you will pursue a subject of your own choosing through research in microfilm and rare books, present your finds to the class, and incorporate them into a final paper. There will also be a short paper, a reading journal, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 – North & South American Literature. Meets with American Culture 498.001. Meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): James McIntosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will identify common cultural dilemmas and opportunities in the Americas and examine common themes and mutual influences in United States and Spanish-American literature. Topics include: (1) García Márquez as creator of an imaginary fictional country with its own American history; (2) Morrison's Beloved as African American history and as a home-grown example of magical realism; (3) Borges and Hawthorne as elaborate provincial artificers, cosmopolitan inventors bred in local American settings; (4) Neruda and Whitman as poets of the vast American landscape and of American sensuality, uncertainty, and fraternity; and (5) Erdrich and Arguedas as storytellers and mediators between native and Euro-American cultures. A reading knowledge of Spanish is desirable but not necessary. Students will be asked to contribute to discussions and write a short paper, a long paper, and a take-home exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 – Yeats, Joyce, and Ireland

Instructor(s): George Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will study the work of two major modern Irish writers, Yeats and Joyce. We will focus on Yeats' poetry and on Joyce's fiction (Dubliners, Portrait of the Artist, and Ulysses) in terms of the construction both of international modernism and of Irish cultural and political nationalism. Both aesthetic and cultural strategies will come up for discussion, and students should feel comfortable with poetry as well as with prose. Through both the literature itself and its contested receptions we will also examine notions of cultural hybridity, and will use the extraordinary controversies over recent editions of Joyce's Ulysses and of Yeats' poetry to explore how the often problematic editorial construction of texts shapes interpretation and theory. Besides reading and discussion, course work will include one-paragraph weekly responses, a brief group oral report (on Ulysses), a paper or two, and an exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 – William Faulkner and Robert Hayden. Meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Laurence Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The largest portion of the syllabus for this course will be given to William Faulkner, whose fiction has exerted a powerful influence on writers around the world. Likely texts are two of his most experimental and highly-orchestrated novels – The Sound and the Fury and Absalom, Absalom – and two of his most controversial popular works – Sanctuary and The Hamlet (the first volume of the Snopes trilogy), as well as several short stories. Robert Hayden's Collected Poems investigates some of the same history that Faulkner scrutinizes, but from an African-American perspective. Together the two authors carry forward themes central to American literature in the 20th century: region and nation, modern sexuality, racial and class identity. At the same time we shall consider questions of career-formation and canonization in these exemplary cases.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 – Rhetoric and the Achievement of Women's Rights. Meets the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Alisse Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL484f00/desc.html

Most nineteenth-century American women had little or no access to political leaders, higher education, or even the wages they earned; they were not allowed to vote, sign contracts, or own property in the United States. Despite these rigid constraints and tremendous opposition, over a span of eight decades American women generated massive social and political changes. How? By using the only tool available to them: language. Clearly, what we say, how we say it, and to whom it is said can – and does – change the world. In this class, you'll learn to use rhetorical theory as a way to critically examine persuasive appeals while we study speeches and other texts from the nineteenth-century woman's rights movement. Together, we will consider the power of language to define, reform, and even revolutionize politics and society. Students will participate in class discussions, write occasional brief responses to the readings, do a short project, and write one longer paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 486. History of Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This will be an introductory survey of literary theory from the romantics to the present, but with emphasis on the exciting and absolutely fundamental changes that have taken place in the past twenty-five years. Major areas of study will include Romanticism, Modernism, New Criticism, Post-structuralism, New Historicism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism. We will be using various kinds of literary theory to help us answer basic questions about what and why we read, questions like: What gives us literary pleasure? Do authors determine the meaning of their texts, or do readers? How is literature related to society and politics? Can pornography be literature? Is there a difference between literature and propaganda? How are male readers/writers different from female readers/writers? On what principles was our literary canon established, and should it be revised? Mix of lecture/discussion, but with a strong emphasis on student participation. Two, possibly three short papers, and a final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 489/Education 440. Teaching of English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leslie Rex

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 489/Education 440. Teaching of English.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Anne Gere

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 489/Education 440. Teaching of English.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): John Stratman

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 001 – Honors

Instructor(s): Adela Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course assists you in conceiving and writing an Honors thesis – your most important piece of work in English Honors. In the initial weeks we examine research methods in the humanities and clarify the nature of the Honors thesis (how it differs from a term paper, for example). The remainder of the course is devoted to nurturing and strengthening your individual project through a linked series of tasks (topic statements, notes on secondary sources, bibliographies, drafts of sections). You present your work in progress to the class, and read and critique your classmates' drafts. By the end of the academic term, you will have a 20- to 30-page draft of your thesis and a strongly focused sense of what changes and additions are needed before you turn in the final version in March. You should also have a clear sense of the demands and rewards of advanced work in literary studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course assists you in conceiving and writing an Honors thesis – your most important piece of work in English Honors. In the initial weeks we examine research methods in the humanities and clarify the nature of the Honors thesis (how it differs from a term paper, for example). The remainder of the course is devoted to nurturing and strengthening your individual project through a linked series of tasks (topic statements, notes on secondary sources, bibliographies, drafts of sections). You present your work in progress to the class, and read and critique your classmates' drafts. By the end of the academic term, you will have a 20- to 30-page draft of your thesis and a strongly focused sense of what changes and additions are needed before you turn in the final version in March. You should also have a clear sense of the demands and rewards of advanced work in literary studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 501/German 501. Old English.

Section 001 – Meets with English 407.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate student standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings – the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the greatest effort of this class will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. You will also develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture and intellectual traditions come from.

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Engl. 516. Literary Research and the Computer.

Section 001 – Meets with English 415.001

Instructor(s): Eric Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lsarth/RTHf00/415f00syl.html

This upperclass and graduate-level course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities, both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., Web sites and CD-ROMs). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that question the impacts of technology. By the middle of the academic term, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include at least information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, the meaning of the digital revolution, text analysis, and image manipulation.

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Engl. 520. Introduction to Graduate Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Henderson (akhender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to English Language and Literature and Women's Studies students only. Graduate standing. (3).A required course for first-year Language & Literature and English & Women's Studies graduate students only.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In their first term, doctoral students take a course entitled Introduction to Graduate Studies. Its primary aim is to review research methodologies and to survey dominant theoretical paradigms.

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Engl. 521. History of Literary Theory.

Section 001 – History of Literary Criticism

Instructor(s): Anne Hermann

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is the first in a two-part series on the history of literary theory and will offer an introductory overview of issues emerging from Plato to the Romantic period. Each historical text will be discussed in the context of contemporary critical theory in order to accentuate the continuing significance of certain issues to the interrogation of the production of knowledge. Of primary concern will be the relationship between philosophy and literature, the connection between self-knowledge and literary knowledge, and the function of language, including the status of literary language. Questions will be organized around "scenes of reading" by focussing on the emergence of the book, the relationship between the physical body and the literary corpus, and philosophical practices as they remain situated in pedagogical relations.

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Engl. 548. Literature of the Modern Period.

Section 001 – US & BRITAIN.

Instructor(s): Sara Blair (sbblair@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended as an introduction to the evolving field known as the "new" modernist studies. Working in both U. S. and Anglo-American contexts, we'll consider questions central to recent work on modernism and the cultural & social contexts of modernity. How can the relations between literature and mass culture best be theorized? How do literary texts move across, respond to, or shore up color lines, separate spheres, and other social boundaries? How can we make sense of competing understandings of "modernism" itself as an object of inquiry, an historical designation, a set of aesthetic practices and field of culture-making? In addition to regular critical and secondary texts, readings will most likely include: Theodore Dreiser's Sister Carrie and Edith Wharton's House of Mirth; D. W. Griffith's Birth of a Nation and Oscar Micheaux's Within Our Gates; E. M. Forster's Howard's End and Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway; Nella Larsen's Passing and F. Scott Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby; Gertrude Stein's Making of Americans and short fiction of Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, Zora Neale Hurston and Anzia Yezierska.

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Engl. 552. Nineteenth Century American Literature.

Section 001 – American Literature, 1800 to 1860.

Instructor(s): K Larson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey of American literature from 1800 to 1860, the course is intended for newcomers to the field as well as for those wishing to lay the foundation for further study. We will examine a number of dilemmas and opportunities facing writers of this period, most notably developments such as the vexed relationship between cultural and racial identity in the formation of a "national character," the rise of sentimentalism in popular culture, and the impact of slavery on the literary imagination. To give our discussions a sense of focus we shall also pay particular attention to the ways in which these and other topics extend, redefine, or render problematic certain assumptions about the emergence of middle-class culture in America. Poetry by Whitman and Dickinson; prose by Tocqueville, Jacobs, and Emerson; fiction by Melville, Warner, Stowe, Hawthorne and others. Secondary readings in the current scholarship will also be assigned and will form the basis for weekly oral reports. Written assignments consist of three short papers and a longer essay at the end of the term.

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Engl. 560. Chaucer: The Major Texts.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karla Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an introductory Chaucer course at the graduate level. We will treat Chaucer's major works, focusing especially on the incomparable classical romance Troilus and Criseyde and the joys of variety in the Canterbury Tales. A few of the shorter poems – probably The Book of the Duchess and The House of Fame – will also help us get a sense of Chaucer's poetic career as French, classical, and Italian materials were melded together into something new: serious, ambitious literature written in English. Since I want your efforts to focus on your reading, I will ask for somewhat less, and different, writing than in most graduate courses; it will come primarily in several short papers intended to raise issues for discussion rather than a final term-paper. Classes will balance lecture and discussion; I will provide historical, social, and literary backgrounds, and we will cooperate on questions of approach and interpretation. I assume no prior knowledge of Chaucer's writings or his Middle English; we will work on language enough so that you can read the poetry (and prose) with comprehension and pleasure, but language will always be subordinate to literary and narrative issues.

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Engl. 569. Writing Workshop in Creative Non-Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): T Lynch

Prerequisites & Distribution: This course is open to MFA students and students in other Graduate programs on campus. Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The boundaries of creative prose have been massively reconfigured in recent decades. The memoir, the speculative biography, the case study, the investigative essay: all have experimented with new voicings and have unsettled old boundaries. Students in this workshop will produce a substantial portfolio of their own nonfiction writing. Workshop strategies will include substantial critique of work in progress, and will include reading and discussion of published work in a variety of modes. This course is open to graduate students both within the MFA Program and without. Those not admitted to the MFA Program in Creative Writing must submit a brief writing sample (10-12 pages), which shows aptitude for creative nonfiction, to Jan Burgess.

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Engl. 570. Research in Composition.

Section 001 – INTRO TO COMPOSITION STUDIES. Meets with Education 621.001 and 639.001

Instructor(s): Anne Gere (argere@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/english/570/001.nsf

This course offers an introduction to Composition Studies, a capacious and interdisciplinary field that has its roots in pedagogy. Accordingly, we will focus on the teaching of writing, beginning with our own experiences as writers, the writing of our students, and the relationship between what we do as readers and writers. This course will consider questions such as: "What can our own literacy narratives tell us about processes of writing and learning to write?" "How do race, gender and class figure in these processes?" "What is good writing?" "What considerations of value shape our thinking about the quality of writing?" "How can the history of composition studies, both inside and outside the academy, inform our teaching?" "How does composition studies situate itself in the academy?" "What do critical theorists have to say to composition teachers and vice versa?" We will look to our own experiences as students and as teachers; to theorists from the Classical period forward; and to contemporary writers as we explore these and related questions.

Because students typically bring a wide variety of experiences and interests to the course, there will be considerable opportunity for self-directed reading along with common course materials. Course requirements will include one long paper, several shorter ones, and a class presentation.

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Engl. 571. Workshop in Writing Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter Ho-Davies (phdavies@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: MFA students only; permission of instructor. This course is only open to current MFA students. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The graduate program in creative writing is a two-year program leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree. Students concentrate in either fiction or poetry. At the heart of the MFA program are the writing workshops, where students assemble as a community of writers to read and comment on one another's work in progress. In addition to their instructional role in the workshops, faculty are available for individual conferences throughout the two-year program, and for thesis instruction and consultation during the second year.

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Engl. 571. Workshop in Writing Fiction.

Section 002 –

Instructor(s): Sharon Schwartz

Prerequisites & Distribution: MFA students only; permission of instructor. This course is only open to current MFA students. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The graduate program in creative writing is a two-year program leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree. Students concentrate in either fiction or poetry. At the heart of the MFA program are the writing workshops, where students assemble as a community of writers to read and comment on one another's work in progress. In addition to their instructional role in the workshops, faculty are available for individual conferences throughout the two-year program, and for thesis instruction and consultation during the second year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Engl. 574. Workshop in Writing Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: MFA students only; permission of instructor. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The graduate program in creative writing is a two-year program leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree. Students concentrate in either fiction or poetry. At the heart of the MFA program are the writing workshops, where students assemble as a community of writers to read and comment on one another's work in progress. In addition to their instructional role in the workshops, faculty are available for individual conferences throughout the two-year program, and for thesis instruction and consultation during the second year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Engl. 574. Workshop in Writing Poetry.

Section 002 –

Instructor(s): Richard Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: MFA students only; permission of instructor. (6).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The graduate program in creative writing is a two-year program leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree. Students concentrate in either fiction or poetry. At the heart of the MFA program are the writing workshops, where students assemble as a community of writers to read and comment on one another's work in progress. In addition to their instructional role in the workshops, faculty are available for individual conferences throughout the two-year program, and for thesis instruction and consultation during the second year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Engl. 577. Independent Study-Creative Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: MFA students only; permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In lieu of the workshop, fourth-semester MFA students receive six hours of independent study credit to enable them to concentrate on completion of the thesis project. Theses consist of a substantial body of poems, short stories, or portions of a novel.

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Engl. 590. Independent Study for M.A. Students.

Prerequisites & Distribution: "Permission of instructor. English Lang. And Lit., English and Education, and Women's Studies students only." Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 640. Studies in Genre.

Section 001 – READING WOMEN'S AUTOBIOGRAPHY: SUBJECTIVITY, IDENTITY, AND THE BODY. Meets with Women's Studies 698.001.

Instructor(s): Sidonie Smith

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Women's Studies 698.001.

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Engl. 644. Topics in the Restoration and Eighteenth Century.

Section 001 – Taste and Beauty. Meets with Comparative Literature 760.001.

Instructor(s): David Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Comparative Literature 760.001.

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Engl. 651. Topics in Colonial and Republican American Literature.

Section 001 – Colonial Self-Fashioning: Texts and Events in the British Colonies of America, 1585 -1800

Instructor(s): Scottie Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

I envision this course not so much as a survey of British literature in the American colonies, but rather as a more focused encounter with the textual remains of certain key historical events. In each segment of the course, we will look at an event or an ongoing enterprise, and read about how varying authors construed those events. For example, what the English colonials called "King Philip's War," a series of battles between Algonquin natives and Puritans in New England in 1675, engendered twenty-nine printed contemporary responses: from Mary Rowlandson's captivity narrative, "The Soveraignty and Goodness of God…"(1682) to Benjamin Church's more secular adventure story, "Entertaining History…"(1675). We will read a number of these texts, as well as the 19th century account of William Apess, a part Pequot Indian, and contemporary criticism about these. Other segments will focus on the colonial ventures in Virginia in the late 16th and early 17th centuries (Strachey, and from Hakluyt's Principal Navigations), the transatlantic slave trade (Aphra Behn, Olaudah Equiano), the religious revivals of the 1730s and 40s known as the Great Awakening (John Marrant, Jonathon Edwards), Enlightenment mapping and collecting of nature (William Byrd, Linnaeus, John and William Bartram, Franklin, Buffon, Jefferson), and the Revolution (Hannah Foster, Charles Brockden Brown, Jefferson, Madison). We will be reading a number of genres: the travel narrative, the captivity and conversion account, the novel, autobiography, the natural history essay, the sermon, and the political declaration. Throughout the course, we will look at how genre, race, gender, ecclesiastical power, faith, and provincialism influenced the making and the transatlantic management of meaning. We will visit the Clements Library with its extensive holdings of early Americana, and on your own, you will do some work with the Early American Imprints microfiche collection at Hatcher. You will do an oral presentation on one of the assigned readings, a short presentation on a primary source of your own discovering, and one long paper due at the end of term (20 pp).

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Engl. 653. Topics in Twentieth Century American Literature.

Section 001 – Chicano Literature. Meets with American Culture 699.002

Instructor(s): John Gonzalez (jmgonzal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will serve as an introduction to the relationship between Latina/o literary productions and the social conditions and possibilities of its production, mainly but not exclusively focusing upon novels since the early 1960s. Topics will include: diasporic and anti-imperialist imaginings, cultural nationalist responses to structural racism, the articulations of literary form and cultural nationalism politics, the fate of both texts and their producers within various institutions, the gendered division of literary labor and the feminist critique of nationalist aesthetics, and queer transformations of the Latino/a literary landscape.

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Engl. 653. Topics in Twentieth Century American Literature.

Section 002 – Local Fictions, National Literature, Global Designs: Regional Writing in the U. S. Meets with American Culture 699.001.

Instructor(s): June Howard

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What does it mean that readers in the urbanizing America of the latter nineteenth century were intensely interested in representations of the local – often, although not always, the rural? What does it mean that critics rediscovered this long-neglected body of work, and contemporary writers revived regionalism, in the globalizing America of the latter twentieth century? This seminar focuses on "local color" writing, a popular and critically admired form in American literature from about 1870 to about 1915, and arguably one that is still vital in the print culture of the early twenty-first century. Through that topic it explores broad questions about the relation of region and nation, tradition and modernity, place and meaning. We will read widely in the diverse tradition of local color writing, concentrating on fiction but including some poetry. The syllabus is likely to include Bret Harte, Edward Eggleston, Zitkala-Sa, Mary Wilkins Freeman, Edith Wharton, Grace Paley, Ursula LeGuin; and will certainly include close consideration of Charles Chesnutt, Sarah Orne Jewett, and Sui Sin Far. We will survey the critical history of the genre, and explore interdisciplinary frameworks for understanding its significance; there will be a substantial amount of secondary reading. We will also explore the resources for archival research that the Bentley and Clements Libraries offer us. The class will proceed primarily by discussion, and students will have considerable range in designing their written projects.

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Engl. 695. Pedagogy: Theory and Practice.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): M Levinson, A Norich

Prerequisites & Distribution: "English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. Students." Graduate standing. (3).This course is required of all 2nd year Language & Literature and English & Women's Studies gradaute students.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This two-semester course is designed to give you guidance, advice and support as you begin your teaching career. During the first semester, we will address issues relevant to the job of teaching assistant: how to organize discussions, how to negotiate your own and your students' relations with the lectures and the professor, grading, strategies for managing office hours and individual consultations, and so on. The second semester will be devoted to ongoing support, and to helping you prepare to teach your own course in the fall: how to pick a theme, design a syllabus, pace assignments, manage assessments, and so on. One of the primary aims of the course is to provide you with a space to discuss anxieties and achievements, but we will also follow a structured program designed to focus on specific aspects of work in the classroom. In addition, we will make regular visits to your classrooms so that we can give you specific feedback on your own strengths and weaknesses. We won't be able to take all the stress out of teaching, but we will emphasize its pleasures as well as its pains. The course will meet regularly for the first four weeks of the fall academic term and then every other week thereafter. In the winter academic term, we will meet five times.

This course is required of all 2nd year Language & Literature and English & Women's Studies students.

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Engl. 822. Seminar: Critical Theory.

Section 001 – Colonialism and The Novel

Instructor(s): Simon Gikandi

Prerequisites & Distribution: "English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. students." Graduate standing. (3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Mansfield Park is a rich work in that its aesthetic intellectual complexity requires that longer and slower analysis that is also required by its geographical problematic, a novel based in an England relying for the maintenance of its style on a Caribbean island. (Edward Said, "Jane Austen and Empire")

"We might almost hence say that the entire inner action of the novel is nothing but a struggle against the power of time." (Georgy Lukacs, The Theory of the Novel)

In this course we will rethink the geography and temporality of the "English" novel within the context of colonialism and decolonization. We will begin with the basic assumption that it was not by accident that the novel-the genre of bourgeois individualism and modernity-developed concurrently with the colonial project. We will take up Edward Said's famous claim, in Culture and Imperialism, that far from being a "coincidental reference" in some of the major works of English fiction, the experience of empire was constitutive of the form of the novel, that the geography and temporality of colonialism was an active agent in the aesthetic ideology of the genre. Our goal-and ambition-is to understand the intellectual complexity that mediated the form of the novel and the social spaces of empire. What will be at issue in the course is not simply what theories have emerged to explain the relation between the metropolis and colony, as it weaves its way through the novel, but how to develop interpretative strategies that will help us understand the significance of colonial outposts in the shaping of English fiction. How is the style of canonical novels such as Jane Austen's Mansfield Part and Charles Dickens' Great Expectations maintained by experiences located in the Caribbean or Australia? How does the culture of colonialism affect the epistemology of the novel as it moves from "realism" to "modernism"? What is the relation between the canonical novels of Englishness and the (post) colonial narratives that emerge to challenge their representation of the colonized? How does the emergence of (post) colonial theory challenge previous histories of the novel and its institutions of exegesis? We will address these questions, first, by reading the experience of empire in the novels where it appears marginal (Mansfield Park, Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, and Great Expectations); we will then focus on novels in which the empire is a phenomenological presence (Kipling's Kim, Conrad's Heart of Darkness, and Forster's A Passage to India). We will read and reread these metropolitan novels in a "contrapuntal" relation with the works of their most powerful (post) colonial interlocutors such as Jean Rhys (The Wide Sargasso Sea), R. Tagore (The Home and the World), Mulk Raj Anand (The Untouchable), Chinua Achebe (Arrow of God), and Salman Rushdie (The Satanic Verses). Our central theoretical text will be Said's Culture and Imperialism. Requirements include a seminar presentation and a research or critical paper.

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Engl. 831. Seminar: The Study of Genre.

Section 001 – VICTORIAN POETRY.

Instructor(s): Yopie Prins

Prerequisites & Distribution: "English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. students." Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this seminar we will read Victorian poetry and poetic theory, with a special emphasis on nineteenth-century debates about meter. Why does meter count so much in Victorian verse and how is it recounted in Victorian metrical theory? Can we account for this preoccupation with form as part of a larger cultural pattern in Victorian England: the formation and formalization of various discourses about education, classical tradition, vernacular literacy, national identity, and so on? Throughout the academic term we will consider the historical and theoretical implications of formal analysis, by placing close reading of poems within the broader context of such questions. We will analyze a wide range of poets known for their metrical innovations, including Arthur Hugh Clough, Matthew Arnold, Alfred Tennyson, Robert Browning, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Christina Rossetti, William Morris, Algernon Swinburne, Amy Levy, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Alice Meynell, and Thomas Hardy. Alongside these poets we will read various treatises on meter, ranging from Coventry Patmore's "Essay on English Metrical Law," pamphlets on the imitation of Classical quantitative verse and other metrical experiments, and George Saintsbury's retrospective survey of Victorian verse in his History of English Prosody. We will also evaluate a turn to "cultural neoformalism" in recent criticism on Victorian poetry, and trace the legacy of Victorian meters in twentieth-century prosody and lyric theory. This seminar is designed for Victorianists and, more generally, for graduate students interested in critical histories and theories of lyric reading.

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Engl. 841. Seminar: An Historical Period.

Section 001 – Desire in the Renaissance. Meets with Women's Studies 801.001

Instructor(s): Valerie Traub

Prerequisites & Distribution: English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. students. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an advanced examination of the wide variety of representations of eroticism in English literature of the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. It is commonly thought that our modern age must be far more liberated and explicit about sexuality than previous eras. But in the last decades of the sixteenth century, circulating in manuscript versions were the first native English pornographic poem (about a dildo), an anonymous lyric advocating female-female marriage, and sonnets celebrating the beauty of a male beloved by the man who would come to be considered the greatest English poet. Renaissance revenge tragedies often depicted brother-sister incest, while crossdressing plays exploited the range of desires enabled by confusions of gender. By the end of the seventeenth century, poems had been published expressing voyeuristic delight in watching one's lover undress, describing the aesthetic allure of a woman's nipples, and making fun of male impotence.

What accounts for this extraordinary range of literary interest in forms of eroticism? This course will ask us to suspend modern conceptual divisions (between heterosexuality and homosexuality, normativity and perversity, for instance) in order to explore, in the broadest possible terms, how poets, dramatists, and medical writers represented erotic desire. What kinds of literary conventions, formal structures, and modes of address did they employ? What patterns of intertextuality, including that of Greek and Roman sources, can we identify? How did dominant medical understandings of the body affect erotic images and narratives? What kind of tropes and understandings did the emergence of the "new science" and colonialist exploration offer to erotic writing? What kinds of pornography were available in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and what do they have to do with literature? How common were expressions of homoerotic desire, and how do we know them when we see them? How are friendship, religious devotion, chastity and race implicated in discourses of eroticism? How useful are modern analytical tools such as narcissism, fetishism, and voyeurism to Renaissance expressions of desire and depictions of erotic practices? Is the gender of the authorial signature pertinent? We will explore these and many other questions and topics, including the homoerotics of pastoral, the colonialist politics of carpe diem, and why Adonis chooses hunting a boar over having sex with Venus.

Our readings will include poems by Marlowe, Shakespeare, Nashe, Donne, Herrick, Marvell, Wroth, Philips, and Behn; plays by Lyly, Webster, Ford, Cavendish (and possibly Shakespeare and Middleton); a few travel narratives and pieces of fictional prose; medical texts on the anatomy of the body and the nature of erotic desire; and a smattering of continental and English pornography. Students should have some familiarity with early modern literature and history (beyond an undergraduate course in Shakespeare), as well as a basic understanding of the tenets of social constructionism (including, but not limited to, Michel Foucault's work on the history of sexuality). Projects will involve both archival and interpretative work, and throughout we will be scrutinizing the adequacy of current critical methods.

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Engl. 852. Seminar: American Literature.

Section 001 – Gender, Genre and the Location of Black Identity: Deconstructing 19th C. African American Literature

Instructor(s): Sandra Gunning (sgunning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: "English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. students." Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Until fairly recently, the study of mid nineteenth-century African American literature and culture has centered around the abolition of U.S. slavery, the use of sentimental literary discourse, and the forging of black American citizenship within the boundaries of the national. As the current embrace of models of transnationalism and globalization demonstrate, however, scholars are now challenging more dramatically than ever before the assumption that early blacks in the United States were inevitably invested in a narrowly defined "American" identity, "American" literary forms, or purely "American" political issues. This course will ask students to make an in-depth study of some key male and female figures in the mid-1800s (Maria Stewart, Martin R. Delany, Nancy Prince, Frederick Douglass, Edward Wilmot Blyden, Mary Seacole, Henry Higland Garnet, etc.) in order to consider their linkages not just to abolitionist writing such as slave narratives and anti-slavery tracts aimed at the U.S. South, but to other genres that emerged from cultural and political movements of the period that conditioned the "African-American" national self-image. Thus, we'll be spending a lot of time researching black involvement in the transAtlantic antislavery movement; the American Colonization Society and the founding of Liberia; American and European overseas commercial, military and missionary activity, etc., and examining the black novels, ethnographies, and travel narratives that were subsequently produced. The goal here is not to toss out the "national" in order to eagerly embrace an alternate narrative of liberational transnationalism, as to offer students an opportunity to study in careful historical and textual detail the complex and contradictory ways in which early black subjects born in the Anglophone Americans might have negotiated both the local and the global, and especially the phenomenon of intra-racial, regional, cultural and gendered difference. (And while this course is nominally "on African-Americans," the role of West Indians such as Seacole and Blyden, of white African colonization advocates, of Africans such as Samuel Crowther encountered by black Americans in West Africa, for instance, will figure prominently in our study.) Requirements: participation in one team-lead class meeting; a short project presentation; an original, 25-page research paper.

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Engl. 881. Seminar: Comparative or Interdisciplinary Study.

Section 001 – New Directions in Cultural Studies. Enrollment requires attending a public lecture every other Monday from 4-5:30.

Instructor(s): David Halperin (halperin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: "English Lang. And Lit., Women's Studies, and English and Ed. students." Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar does not address a specific topic. Rather, it is organized around a series of six or seven prominent scholars who will be coming to the University of Michigan during the term to give a public lecture and to meet with members of the seminar. The seminar will be devoted to reading their work and discussing it with them. We'll spend one week reading a quantity of their previous work. The next week, all members of the seminar will attend the speaker's formal lecture. Then, at a meeting of the seminar, a day or so after the lecture, we will have a chance to chat more informally with the speaker, to ask him or her questions about the lecture as well as about the texts of his or hers that we have read.

The speakers will all be engaged in various forms of cultural studies. In selecting them, I will be taking into account their appeal to a broad segment of our Department and University. I will also be choosing speakers, more specifically, whose work in cultural studies deals with materials that tend to lie beyond the boundaries of literary studies. In particular, I am hoping that one area that will be represented fairly consistently throughout the term will be science studies. This is a field that is not only undergoing rapid and exciting development, but has attracted a good deal of public criticism for its alleged resistance to reason, rationality, and expert knowledge – a supposedly classic example of humanists mucking about in areas they don't understand and promoting a new obscurantism or "higher superstition." So this is a field which is not only intellectually stimulating but is also politically contentious, and it raises larger issues about epistemology and authority in the humanities and social sciences.

Among the speakers who have agreed to lecture to our Department and to participate in our seminar are Myra Jehlen, Roddey Reid, Arnold Davidson, and Barbara Herrnstein Smith, as well as two other speakers who are to be announced later.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Engl. 992. Directed Study for Doctoral Students/Precandidate.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Must have a Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Engl. 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

This page was created at 8:10 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.


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