College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in French (Division 371)

This page was created at 7:54 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in French

Wolverine Access Subject listing for FRENCH

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for French.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in French this week go to What's New This Week.


French 438/Rom. Ling. 456/EducationD 456. Topics in Learning and Teaching French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alain Martinossi (alainm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/french/438/001.nsf

This course is specifically intended for prospective teachers of French. Although students will be introduced to theories which can be applied to the teaching of any language, practical applications of these theories will all be done in French.

The purpose of this course is to present methods of teaching secondary level foreign languages. The course is designed for prospective middle and high school teachers who are competent in their language skills and now seek to focus that competency into a personal teaching style in a foreign language classroom. Issues such as curriculum development and instructional models of teaching will be addressed. Throughout the course, student will actively and reflectively practice their teaching skills in preparation for effective student teaching. Please note that this course should be taken by students enrolled in the teacher certification program at the school of Education, and preferably the term just prior to student teaching.

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to

  • become familiar with the 5 goals of the standards for foreign language learning
  • become familiar with current theories of second language acquisition/teaching through readings and class discussions
  • participate in a range of activities (i.e., development of instructional material targeting various skills, teaching demonstrations, class observations) through which they will demonstrate their understanding of theoretical concepts discussed in class.
  • learn and apply various teaching techniques consistent with the current theories of second language acquisition and teaching
  • observe and critique teaching performances
  • become acquainted with technology for the foreign language classroom and implement it in their teaching
  • participate in professional electronic discussions in order to further explore issues discussed in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 450. Special Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 The French New Novel and its Francophone Equivalents

Instructor(s): Jarrod Hayes (hayesj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3).Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on the challenges the French New Novel (le nouveau roman) brought to novelistic conventions such as linear narrative, the distinction between characters and objects, narrative time, and the omniscient narrator who is able to authorize a "true" version of a novel's events. In particular, we will consider how Francophone novels incorporated similar challenges, often to more political ends. Rereading the French New Novel through its Francophone parallels also allows readers to better understand the New Novel's frequent reproduction of colonial discourse. This course will begin with an exemplary New Novel from France and then move on to one of the most intricate novels of each of the four major Francophone regions. Special attention will be devoted to the practical issues of reading through the difficulties of many contemporary novels. We will also consider how questioning more conventional models of narrativity brings about a reconceptualization of the notions of identity, history, nationality, and gender. Graduate students are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course and will be asked to supplement the required readings with additional novels selected individually in consultation with the instructor.

Requirements: two papers, an on-going journal of reactions to the readings, a class presentation.

Novels: La maison du rendez-vous, Alain Robbe-Grillet (France) Nedjma, Kateb Yacine (Algeria) La vie et demie,. Sony Labou Tansi. (Congo) L'isolé soleil, Daniel Maximin. (Guadeloupe) French Kiss (in French), Nicole Brossard. (Quebec)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 528/Rom. Ling. 528/Spanish 528. Teaching Romance Languages.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helene Neu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing.

Credits: (3 in the half-term)

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Romance Linguistics 528.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 652. Studies in 16th Century French Literature.

Section 001 The Interrogation of Religious Culture: Belief, Unbelief, and Disbelief in The Renaissance.

Instructor(s): George Hoffmann

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"We can no longer expect any new religions," observed E. M. Cioran in 1992, "But that exception aside, we find ourselves in the situation of the last pagans." Our beliefs today from the various fundamentalisms to New Age eclecticisms seem to compel us only as do fictions, and in this sense, religion may indeed occupy in our culture a role akin to that held by mythology in Late Antiquity. "I want to believe," reads the motto prominently displayed in a popular television series; this combination of incredulity and, simultaneously, the willing suspension of disbelief in short, the notion of entertaining a belief suggests that we often approach the question of personal faith as we would enter into reading a novel. To put it differently, and in a historical perspective, belief seems to have become speculative in a way once only doubt appeared to be.

Or so it would seem. If one looks in the right places, however, one easily finds in early modern times a personally creative attitude toward faith. Despite, and, at times, because of institutional attempts to suppress a diversity of religious views, the spectrum of sentiment in earlier ages extended far beyond any simple alternative between casual dismissal and doctrinaire acceptance. The rapid changes of the Renaissance exposed a fragile but extensive reef of 'disbelief' before the sectarian splits of the Wars of Religion once again submerged it, removing it from public expression and reconstituting it as private conscience. Throughout, it was the desire for belief, rather than its conviction, and the hope of finding an answer to the age-old problem of mortality, that formed the core of early modern religious experience. This course proposes examining what was idiosyncratic about belief through studying works of literature not ostensibly religious in nature but whose imaginative dimension affords a special vantage point onto belief not as it was argued in the halls of the Faculty of Theology at the Sorbonne, but as it was experienced in the individual's heart.

Although Montaigne's Essais will provide the major focus for this inquiry, we will also read as comparaison Erasmus' Naufrage, Des Perriers' Cymbulum Mundi, and Rabelais' "L'Abbaye de Seuilly." Alongside this, we will examine three modern works of criticism that have become pivotal in historians' recent move toward seeing religion as a cultural, as opposed to a theological, phenomenon. First, in Le Problème de l'incroyance au 16e siècle (1942), Lucien Febvre argued that the everyday world of the Renaissance was so steeped in religious ritual as to make unbelief impossible. Rabelais and his contemporaries, Febvre claimed in a phrase pregnant with presupposition, lacked the "outillage mental" necessary for atheism. But in 1976, Carlo Ginzburg published The Cheese and the Worms: The Cosmos of a Sixteenth-Century Miller, a moving portrait of a man who did indeed seem not to believe. More recently still, in Christianity in the West, 1400-1700 (1985), John Bossy has opened our eyes to the strangeness of "main-stream" faith as it was actually practiced and understood.

Grades will reflect work on two papers, a short presentation, participation in class discussion and a few short assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 655. Studies in 19th Century French Literature.

Section 001 Balzac & Flaubert

Instructor(s): William Paulson (wpaulson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will be devoted to the works of the two best-known nineteenth-century French novelists, often seen as a contrasting couple: the prolific, ambitious, vulgar, didactic Balzac versus the spare, unworldly, distinguished, and impersonal Flaubert. Many of these oppositions crystalize around the contested and elusive phenomenon known as modernity: Balzac the romantic vs. Flaubert the modern, or Balzac the modern vs. Flaubert the postmodern. This issue of modernity will be among the central concerns of the course; others will include the function of the novel as a site where historical and social understanding is constructed, and the materiality of the fictional text and its conditions of production. Readings will be extensive, as is to be expected in a course on the novel, but much of our time in class will be devoted to close work with selected passages so as to keep our discussions concrete. Readings from critics and theorists as needed. Active participation in class, including one presentation; term paper.

Readings:

  • Balzac:

    • La Peau de chagrin
    • Le Chef-d'oeuvre inconnu
    • Facino Cane
    • Le Cousin Pons
  • Flaubert:

    • Madame Bovary
    • L'Education sentimentale
    • Bouvard et Pecuchet

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 899. Independent Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


French 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

French 993/Rom. Ling. 993/Spanish 993/Italian 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Helene Neu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Romance Linguistics 993..

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

This page was created at 7:54 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.


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