College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in German (Division 379)

This page was created at 7:55 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in German

Wolverine Access Subject listing for GERMAN

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for German.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in German this week go to What's New This Week.


German 401/Hist. 416. Nineteenth-Century German and European Thought.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German concentrators must be concurrently enrolled in German 403. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Between the upheavals of the French Revolution and the First World War, the European nations witnessed an utter transformation of their world. The relations of the person to the nation, to the state, to history, and to the physical world were rethought from top to bottom. Our exploration of modern ideas and cultural movements will take us from rationalism to racism, and from utopian ideologies to the birth of psychoanalysis. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, a midterm exam, several short quiz and take-home assignments, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 425. Advanced German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hermann Weiss (hfweiss@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 325/326. (3).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Various approaches will be used to improve the students' written and spoken German. Weekly compositions and subsequent rewrites form an important part of the course work. Most of the topics are assigned by the instructor, but occasionally students may select their own topics. This course also involves readings in nineteenth and twentieth century history and literature in preparation for class discussions, as well as viewings of films and other visual materials. Several presentations are required of each student. German is used exclusively in this course. The final grade is based on the compositions as well as participation in the discussions. German 426 may be taken independently of German 425.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 449. Special Topics in English Translation.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 The Emigration of German Modernism.

Instructor(s): Michael Latham (mrlatham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).Rackham credit requires additional work. May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How did New York become the center of modern art in the post-war years? Chicago the center of international architecture? What did the Container Corporation of America have to do with the arranging the marriage of commerce and modernism, and with promoting the concept of corporate culture? How did significant holdings in 20th century European art end up in such unlikely places as Detroit, Minneapolis and St. Louis? This course follows the emigration of artists associated with German Expressionism and the Bauhaus into exile from Hitler's Germany and relocation in the United States. We will direct particular attention to the development of new institutions for instruction in art and design; mass production and industrial design, and the uneasy relationship of commerce and culture at mid-century. Readings, artworks, architecture and design by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Marcel Breuer, Laszls Moholy-Nagy, Herbert Bayer, Josef and Anni Albers, Max Beckmann, Oskar Kokoschka, others. All readings and discussions in English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 465/MEMS 475/Hist. 485. Marriage and Marital Life in History: Medieval and Early Modern Germany.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (hell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Marriage is one of the most central institutions in human societies. Contrary to previous generations, however, today we are beginning to look upon marriage as an institution subject to historic change. In the union of husband and wife gender relations are defined, reenacted and, at the same time, constantly reconstructed. But how was the female sphere defined in the fifteenth century? Did the Reformation affect society's understanding of matrimony? What was married life like in a world where two out of four children were likely to die? Where, and when, do we encounter love-matches? We will explore marriage discourse and policies in a culturally well-defined context, Western Europe, especially the German-speaking countries between ca. 1350 and 1600. By examining the depiction of marriage in literature and art of the age we will come to a more complex understanding of what marriage was supposed to be and what it really meant. This course will be of interest to German, History, MARC, and Women's Studies concentrators. No German required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 491. German Honors Proseminar.

Section 001 The Twentieth Century: Literature and Genocide

Instructor(s): Hubert Rast (hubrast@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior Honors standing. (3).May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Completion of the sequence of German 491 and 492 is required for an Honors concentration in German Studies. Interested students are encouraged to contact the Honors Concentration Advisor for admission into the program (minimum 3.0 GPA with at least 3.5 in German) for Fall term of their senior year, preferably but not necessarily as early as Winter term of their sophomore year. German 491 is regarded as a preparatory term in anticipation of 492 (Winter), in which each student writes an Honors thesis. The kinds of work to be read will be determined in part by the perceived needs of the students, geared possibly toward already-identified thesis topics and/or toward intensified focus on reading literary texts, acquiring and honing interdisciplinary research skills, and developing a persuasive and sustained argument. Every effort will be made to accommodate students with a broad range of interests from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds.

Regardless of ultimate subject matter, the intent of the seminar will be to increase students' critical reading abilities in their chosen field of interest and their familiarity with secondary literature, source material, and contemporary scholarship. Requirements for the course include at least one oral presentation (depending on the number of participants) and two papers (to total about 25 pages, in German or English). Students are urged to contact the Honors Concentration Advisor in advance of the Fall term to arrange an interview in which particular individual needs and interests will be discussed, so that the course may be tailored to fit each group.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

German 499. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 Management and Marketing.

Instructor(s): Janet Van Valkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond German 232. (3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course offers authentic information and terminology as they apply to professional practices in the fields of company structure, management and marketing in the German-speaking world. Using authentic situations and materials, the students become acquainted with the forms, roles and related organizations of German companies. These are followed by management and manager skills, marketing and advertising in German companies. The course includes the essential cross-cultural aspects of doing business in/with Germany and is interactive. German is the language of instruction.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 501/English 501. Old English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 501.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

German 503/EducationD 500. Teaching German/Applied Linguistics.

Section 001 Applied Linguistics for Teachers of German.

Instructor(s): Robert Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

If one source of difficulty in the acquisition of a foreign language is the structure of the foreign language itself, especially where it differs significantly from the structure of one's native language, then the teacher of the foreign language should be aware of those differences and be prepared to address them directly or indirectly in the classroom.

The primary goal of the course will be to undertake a systematic comparison of the structures of American English and German in order to identify these areas of potential difficulty for the American learner of German, and to devise approaches for dealing with them. We shall focus on the structures of pronunciation, word formation and inflection, sentence formation, discourse, and semantics. Going beyond a simple contrastive analysis, however, we shall also consider learner-strategies that are independent of structural discrepancies between first language and second language.

Our approach will be eclectic, touching upon several models of linguistic description structural linguistics, cognitive grammar, dependency grammar, developmental linguistics, etc. and will not be keyed to any single theoretical dogma. We shall consider several relevant issues: children's acquisition of language, circumstances prohibiting children's acquisition of language, adult acquisition strategies, Gastarbeiterdeutsch, language contact phenomena in general, and especially the social implications of adherence/non-adherence to the perceived Standard.

Students should have a good command of English and German. Previous coursework in linguistics is not required. There will be homework problems, frequent short written exercises, a short mid-way paper, a final paper of approximately 20 pages, and an oral presentation of the final paper. Students will also be asked to lead discussions on topics of special interest to them.

German 503 is open to graduates and undergraduates, and counts toward the 30-hour German concentration as well as the 18-hour German minor. It also counts toward the Education School's requirements for Teaching Certificate candidates in German.

The required text is Anthony Fox, The Structure of German (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990), plus a course pack (at Accu-Copy). Additional articles and book-chapters will be available in the Department Seminar Library.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 540. Introduction to German Studies.

Section 001 Meets with History 591.002.

Instructor(s): Scott Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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German 821. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 MARX, WEBER, AND GERMAN POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY.

Instructor(s): Andrei Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will analyze the writings of Karl Marx, Max Weber, Georg Simmel, Robert Michels, Werner Sombart and Ferdinand Toennies. In particular, we will look at the political sociology of these writers and investigate how their view of society and the state shaped their analyses of modernity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

German 822. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 Trauma, Memory, and Cultural Analysis. Meets with Comparative Literature 770.001.

Instructor(s): Julia Hell (hell@umich.edu), Jim Porter

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/complit/770/001.nsf

See Comparative Literature 770.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

German 841. Seminar: Studies in German Literature.

Section 001 German Literature and Culture Since 1989. (Credits ?).

Instructor(s): Julia Hell (hell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (2-3).

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this seminar, we will explore the cultural landscape of the post-89 Germany, with an emphasis on literary production. We will begin with a series of debates that erupted after the fall of the wall: the so-called first Literaturstreit, provoked by the publication of Christa Wolf's Was bleibt (1979-1989); the controversy around Stephan Hermlin, initiated by Karl Corino's treatise Aussen Marmor, innen Gips: Die Legenden des Stephan Hermlin (1996); and, finally, the so-called Walser-Bubis Debatte in 1998-2000. Our reading of these post-unification debates will address the following questions: How do these discussions (re)-define the status of the author, and the notion of Nachkriegsliteratur? How do they negotiate the political and literary legacy of the former GDR? How do they engage the memory of the Nazi past? In the second part of the course, we will focus on the issue of the so-called Wendeliteratur. We will begin this section with poems by Heiner Müller and Volker Braun reflecting on the topic of writing after the collapse of the GDR. We will further trace this topic in Wolfgang Hilbig's most recent novel, Das Provisorium (2000). This novel will also introduce the issue of the representation of the GDR which we will follow back to Hilbig's earlier novel, Alte Abdeckerei (1989). These questions will also inform our readings of texts by Kurt Drawert, Kerstin Hensel, and Angela Krauss. The goal of this section is to approach very carefully the issue of an aesthetics of transition. (The readings will include a selection of texts dealing with literary theory, and narrative analysis). In the third part of the seminar, we will concentrate on the question of minority literature(s). We will start out with a discussion of Leslie Adelson's critique of this notion; we will then explore the work of authors such as Herta Müller, Emine Sevgi Özdamar, Freidoum Zaimoglu, and Maxim Biller. We will end this exploration of post-unification literature with a reading of Sebald's The Emigrants (1992).

Requirements: students will be asked to present some of the required readings; in addition, students will write a seminar paper, and present their project in one of the final sessions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

German 901. Directed Reading in German Literature and Linguistics.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (2-4). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For degree candidates who have completed course requirements and who need supplementary work. Under supervision of graduate committee.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

German 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

German 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Hartmut Rastalsky (hmr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

German 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

This page was created at 7:55 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.


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