College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in History (Division 390)

This page was created at 7:56 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in History

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTORY

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for History.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in History this week go to What's New This Week.


History 408. Byzantine Empire, 284-867.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Fine

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A lecture course which provides a survey of the history of the later Roman Empire from the reforms of Diocletian that paved the way out of the crisis of the third century, through Constantine's move east and the conversion to Christianity (entering the Byzantine period), Justinian, Heraclius on through the Amorion Dynasty which came to a close with the murder of Michael the Sot in 867. The course will stress political history, giving considerable attention as well to religious history (conversion to Christianity, the great theological disputes over the relationship between God the Father and the son as well as the relationship between the human and divine natures in Christ culminating in the Church councils of Nicea and Chalcedon, the rise of monasticism and Iconoclasm), administrative reforms (Diocletian's and Constantine's reforms, the reforms of the seventh century culminating in the Theme system), demographic changes and foreign relations (Goths, the Slavic and Bulgar invasions, relations with the Bulgars, relations with the Persians and Arabs in the East and later with the Franks and Charlemagne). No background is assumed. Requirements: a midterm written hour-exam. One ten page paper and a final examination. Paper topics are tailored to individual interests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 416/German 401. Nineteenth-Century German and European Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See German 401.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

History 433. Imperial Russia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Deborah Field (debfield@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/history/433/001.nsf

A history of Russia from Peter the Great to 1917, with emphasis on society transformations and continuities in elite and popular cultures, autocratic and opposition politics, economic and social structures. Students will read and interpret political documents and fiction, in addition to secondary works. Requirements: participation in discussions, two short essays, midterm exam, final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 or 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 440/ACABS 413/Anthro. 442. Ancient Mesopotamia: History and Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~nyoffee/syllancient%20mesop-2000.htm

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 413.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 446/AAS 446. Africa to 1850.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Cohen (dwcohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 200 recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/history/446/001.nsf

This course explores the pre-colonial African past, from the early prehistory of the human to the eve of Europe's second great wave of empire when Africans across most of the continent became the subjects of European colonies. The second European empires (from roughly the 1870s through the 1960s) have had profound influence on Africa, yet important global forces were affecting Africa long before the mid-nineteenth century. Moreover, the shapes that Africa would take under the influence of European empire would be strongly conditioned by the course of change on the continent before 1850 and by the nature of society and culture on the continent stretching back for more than a millennium.

The major objective of this course is to establish a deeper understanding of the forces, institutions, and processes that underlay the experiences of Africans and the African continent before 1850. The post-1850 history of Africa will be taken up by Professor Diouf during the second term, in History 448.

Over the past five decades, the reconstruction of the African past-from archaeological evidence, from oral testimonies, and from historical linguistics and from other methods and materials-has been one of the most remarkable departures in the historical sciences, taking the professional craft of history beyond its signature: the written document. Of course, the peoples of Africa long enjoyed a rich knowledge of their past and a deep engagement with history, well before the emergence of the professional practice of history on the continent. And a critical factor in the shaping of Africa's futures has been the production and control of histories for and about the continent.

Albeit the breakthroughs in the reconstruction of Africa's past, and albeit the importance of historical knowledge to Africans, Africa is substantially "known" today-by those outside Africa, by the international press, by the aid and development and the human rights communities-through a shallow and relatively presentist understanding, partially based on direct observation, partially based on persistent and pervading myths and fantasies about Africa, myths that have their own significant histories. The course will encourage a more complex understanding of Africa and a sense of African history as a work-in-progress.

The course will explore

  • Africa's earliest history
  • The histories and fates of pre-colonial empires, kingdoms, and states across the continent
  • The shapes of African culture and society
  • The Atlantic slave trade and its impacts on Africa
  • The rise of Islam in Africa
  • The relations of Europe and Africa before the second European empires
  • Basic conditions of life in pre-colonial Africa
  • African modernities before "modernity"

Among the main questions, the recurrent questions: Africa's Past: How has it come to be known, understood, comprehended, explained? Africa's Cultures: The utility of models of continuity and change? Africa's Civilizations: The ethics of autocracy and domination? Africa's Connections to the Wider World: Determined or negotiated? Africa's Economies: The fates of value and equity in extractive economies? Africa's Resources: Whose materials, to what use, to what effect?

The course will be organized around lectures, readings, discussions, the viewing of several films from Africa.

Course requirements:

  1. Participation in class discussion. 15%.
  2. A critical book review of a monograph from the "recommended list"-three to four pages. 25%.
  3. Midterm exam. 25%.
  4. Final exam constructed, in essay form, around the "recurrent questions" above. 35%.
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 451. Japan Since 1700.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leslie Pincus (lpincus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will explore the history of Japan from the dissolution of a semi-feudal system in the 18th and early 19th centuries to Japan's rise as a world economic power in the latter half of the 20th century. We will address both the major historical themes during these two centuries of radical transformation and the issues at stake in historical interpretation. The course covers: (1) the decline of official power during the Tokugawa era and the rise of a new plebeian public sphere; (2) Japan's coerced entry into the world market; (3) the consolidation of a modern nation-state, industrialization, and the beginnings of Japanese imperialism in Asia; (4) the rise of social protest and mass culture; (5) political reaction and militarism; (6) defeat in the Pacific War and the U.S. Occupation; (7) postwar recovery and the contested emergence of a conservative hegemony; (8) myths and realities of Japan's new affluent "information society." Class sessions will combine lecture, discussion and audio-visual. Assignments: brief critical summaries of readings, discussion panels, in-class midterm, final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

Section 001 Modern Southeast Asia I: Colonialism.

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrazek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The major theme of this course will be "modernization" of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Siam/Thailand,Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Burma) a historical conflict between the societies of the region and the global community of "developed" nations. Political, social, and intellectual history will be studied but, first of all, the course wants to be an introduction to a sensitive and well-informed reading of a broadest variety of historical sources.

The emphasis, in the fall academic term, will be on the colonial period, 1870-1945. Students, in the next academic term, can choose to take a sequel to the course, which will deal with the period of post-colonialism and of independent Southeast Asian states since the Second World War to the present. Individual students' interest in particular region and period will be fully supported.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

History 455. Classical India and the Coming of Islam 320-1526 A.D.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas Trautmann

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The greater part of this course concerns itself with the history of ancient India in its classical age beginning with the empire of the Guptas, and attempts to analyse the components of Indian civilization in its classical form (kinship, caste, political organization, religious institutions). It then examines the Turkish invasions and the challenges posed by Islamic rule. This is a lecture course, and it presumes no prior study of India on the part of any of its participants (except the professor). Both undergrads and grad students are welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 460. American Colonial History to 1776.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Juster (sjuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Colonial America" focuses on the people of the time, often encountered speaking in their own voices, and on their broad cultural characteristics and problems as settlers first encountered the New World and its inhabitants and matured into colonial societies. Through weekly discussion of primary documents and historical studies, we will explore some of the key themes of early American history from the vantage point of the historical actors themselves: the clash between Puritanism and capitalism; the confrontation between Native American and European cultures; the emergence of a native gentry in the colonial South; and the enslavement of Africans and their transportation to the New World. History 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. Students will be expected to read closely each week (average 150 pages/week), take a midterm exam, and write several short essays and a long research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

History 466. The United States, 1901-1933.

U.S. History

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Sidney Fine (sidneyf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is concerned with the progressive era, the era of World War I, the 1920's, and the Great Depression. The emphasis is on political history and foreign relations, but considerable attention is given to social, cultural, and economic factors and to the position of minority groups and women in American society. There is no textbook for the course, but several paperbacks are assigned. Course requirements include a midterm, a final examination, and a paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 473/Asian Studies 473/Korean 473. Modern Korea.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry Em (henryem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/korean/473/001.nsf

See Korean 473.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 476/Anthro. 416. Latin America: The Colonial Period.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the colonial period in Latin American history from the initial Spanish and Portuguese contact and conquest to the nineteenth-century wars of independence. It will focus on the process of interaction between Indians and Europeans, tracing the evolution of a range of colonial societies in the New World. Thus we will examine the indigenous background to conquest as well as the nature of the settler community. We will also look at the shifting uses of land and labor,and at the importance of class, race, gender, and ethnicity. The method of instruction is lecture and discussion. Each student will write a short critical review and a final paper of approximately 10 to 12 pages. There will be a midterm and a final. Readings will include works by Inga Clendinnen, Nancy Farris, Karen Spalding and Charles Gibson, as well as primary materials from Aztec and Spanish sources. The text will be Burkholder and Johnson, COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 485/German 465/MEMS 475. Marriage and Marital Life in History: Medieval and Early Modern Germany.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See German 465.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 494/Econ. 494. Topics in Economic History.

Section 001 Economic History of Japan

Instructor(s): Gary Saxonhouse (grsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Economics 494.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

History 509/Anthro. 508 Empire and Culture in British India.

Section 001 "The British Raj" in India.

Instructor(s): Sumathi Ramaswami

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Focusing on "the British Raj" in India, this seminar explores recent scholarship in the emergent field of culture and colonialism. The aim of the course is to understand the extent to which "culture" was the crucial "technology" for the production and maintenance of colonial hegemony in India. In contrast to approaches to colonial rule in South Asia which focus on the military, political and economic domination exercised by the British in the subcontinent, this seminar will interrogate the intellectual gains to be made by understanding the cultural and intellectual processes that undergirded the hegemonic presence of the Raj in India. Topics include the role played by Orientalism and knowledge production in producing colonial subjects: the use of English literature as "masks of conquests;" the implication of science and technology in the exercise of colonial power; the production of a "rule of difference" through deployment of ideologies linked to race, gender and sexuality; Christianity and conversion; and the emergence of nationalist thought in the shadow of colonial hegemony. We will also spend a week considering the enormous intellectual contribution of Bernard S. Cohn to our current understanding of colonialism and the British Raj.

While knowledge of South Asian history is desirable, it is not necessary. Readings have been selected with a view to their broad theoretical and conceptual applicability to other realms of empire.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 526. France Since 1870.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laura Lee Downs (bombe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended as an introduction to the major themes and debates in the literature on contemporary France. We will give critical attention to a number of themes that have long shaped the literature on modern France the paradox of chronic political upheaval in a context of apparently stable social structures, for example, or the vexed issue of France's economic "backwardness" and the particularities of industrial development in this (until recently) rural society. We will also consider some of the more recently popular themes the social and political mobilization of economically and socially disadvantaged groups (peasants, women, workers, disgruntled strata of the middle classes), the ways in which various strands of the revolutionary tradition have shaped French politics on the right and on the left. Finally, we will give comparative attention to the different historiographical traditions that have organized research on the two sides of the Atlantic, of which the very different understandings of gender and women's history, or the very different approaches to colonial and post-colonial history, form but two of the most salient examples.

There are no prerequisites other than curiosity about France and things French. Open to undergraduate and graduate students alike, the course will mix lecture and discussion format. There will be two or three short (4-6 page) papers during the term and a take-home final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 537/AAPTIS 463. The Near East in the Period of the Crusades, 945-1258.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Adam Sabra

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 463.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

History 551. Social and Intellectual History of Modern China.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ernest Young (epyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/F00/HS551/index.html

In this course we will treat a selected set of major aspects of Chinese history from the 18th century to the present. A central task will be to sort out the roots, processes, and consequences of the Chinese revolution. We shall examine the testimony of conservatives as well as revolutionaries, of Confucians as well as Marxists. Among the topics will be: secret societies and religious cults; trends in Confucian thought and the role of popular culture; Christian missions and imperialism; nationalism and ethnicity; women's liberation; cultural iconoclasm and neotraditionalism; Marxism and the Chinese peasant, Maoism and its debunking. Previous familiarity with the broad outline of events will be useful but is not required. Readings will be drawn from analytical literature and translated documents. Participants will be asked to write two papers and take a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

History 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 001 Narrative, Case Files, and Women's Health. (2 credits). Meets with Women's Studies 698.002. Meeting Dates Are: Thursdays 9/28, 10/5, 10/12, 10/19, 11/16 At 2-5 p.m. and Tuesdays 10/3, 10/10 At 5-8 p.m. and Friday, 10/20 At 10 A.M.-1 p.m. (Drop/Add deadline=October 5).

Instructor(s): Nancy Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu) , Timothy Johnson (trbj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This one-credit mini-course will meet jointly with a one-month intensive rotation for fourth-year medical students, and these medical students will also be taking a Rackham Interdisciplinary Seminar on the Body entitled "The Body and Its Disciplines" (799.570, sec. 002/ German 379.499, sec. 001/ Comp. Lit. 354.750, sec. 001), taught by Prof. Silke-Maria Weineck. "Narrative, Case Files, and Women's Health" will consider issues of medical practitioners' stories and patients' illness narratives as revealed in diaries and ethnographic, medical, and social work case files. The approach will be historical, anthropological, multicultural, and biomedical. For each of the four weeks, we will consider a different body of doctor stories, illness narratives, and/or medical case files related to a particular theme in women's reproductive health. We will (1) go back in time to at least the 1920s through an Ann Arbor obstetrician's patient notes; (2) go explicitly transcultural by looking at women's health care among non-white, non-Anglo women in this country and/or to a non-Western region of the world; (3) have one session where we read recent social work and medical case files and discuss them with some of the health professionals who were involved; and (4) consider the new kinds of narratives and case files that will emerge as reproductive technologies continue to move in a high-tech direction.

This course is intended for Ph.D. students in LS&A, Nursing, and Public Health, especially those who are enrolled in the Rackham-sponsored seminar on the Body. Upper-level undergraduates may enroll with the permission of Prof. Nancy Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Upper-level undergraduates may enroll with the permission of Prof. Hunt

History 591. Topics in European History.

Section 001 Gender and Power: Historical and Comparative Perspectives. Meets with Sociology 495.001.

Instructor(s): Sonya Rose (sorose@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Sociology 495.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 591. Topics in European History.

Section 002 Introduction to German Studies. Meets with German 540.001.

Instructor(s): Scott Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 591. Topics in European History.

Section 003 Domination Occupation Collaboration: People's Everyday in NAZI-Germany and in Occupied Europe, 1939-45.

Instructor(s): Alf Luedtke

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Domination inside Nazi-Germany was not merely the result of SS terror and propaganda machinations by Dr. Goebbels or Leni Riefenstahl, for that matter. Across the board of society the vast majority of Germans accepted if not actively cooperated in racist political practices. They involved themselves in the brutal exclusion of "non-Aryans" as they actively fought the wars of expansion and extermination after 1939 across Europe.

While recent research has unravelled the web of "domination as social practice" inside Germany, a similar debate is only to begin as to occupied nations/societies in Europa. Here, Nazi approaches varied fundamentally. In Poland and the USSR the effort was to destroy national/cultural fabric (subsequently annihilating at least parts of the respective populations). In other parts of Europe, however, occupation aimed at eliciting cooperation.

To what extent did these policies work? When it comes to forms and degress of accomodation the specifices of the occupied societies are crucial. And: Where to draw the line between "structural accomodation" in order to survive and more "deliberate" ones (Ph.Burrin)? Or should one distinguish passive accomodation from more active collusion/cooperation/collaboration?

This course shall examine these questions focussing on Poland and the USSR, Belgium, the Netherlands, France, and Greece.

Literature: Philippe Burrin, France Under the Germans: Collaboration and Compromise (New York: New Press 1969).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 592. Topics in Asian History.

Section 001 History of Burma.

Instructor(s): Victor Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3).May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the history of Burma, from the earliest times to the present day. It seeks to chronicle the origins of Burmese civilization and to identify elements of continuity and innovation during the long monarchical period, the colonial era, the post-war independence era, and the current period of political turmoil. The course will attempt to identify unique elements of Burma's remarkable Buddhist culture, but at the same time to place Burmese development in a Southeast Asian and Eurasian context.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

History 593. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 From Pan-Africanism to the Black Atlantic: what's in a Name. Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 461.001 and History 393.001

Instructor(s): Penny von Eschen (pmve@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3).May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 461.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 593. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 002 Capialism, Industrialization, and Community Formation in Antebellum New England. Meets with American Culture 496.004 and 601.001.

Instructor(s): Francois Weil (fweil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3).May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on social change in antebellum New England. We shall examine the impact of capitalist development and industrialization on the region's social and cultural fabric. Among the topics will be : migrations (internal and international), gender relations, civic identities, and cultural tensions. The course will combine lectures and class discussions with a hands-on approach of primary sources. Attention will be paid to historiographical, theoretical, and methodological issues. Each participant will be asked to write a critical review and a final research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 600/Information 580. Introduction to Archival Administration.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Yakel (yakel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/si/si/580/001.nsf

Provides an understanding of why societies, cultures, organizations, and individuals create and keep records. Presents cornerstone terminology, concepts, and practices used in records management and archival administration. Examines the evolution of methods and technologies used to create, store, organize, and preserve records and the ways in which organizations and individuals use archives and records for ongoing operations, accountability, research, litigation, and organizational memory. Participants become familiar with the legal, policy, and ethical issues surrounding records and archives administration and become conversant with the structure, organization, and literatures of the archival and records management professions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 604. Comparative Studies of Select Problems in History.

Section 002 Race, Gender, and Empire: The Political Culture of U.S. Imperialism

Instructor(s): Penny von Eschen (pmve@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will begin by focusing on the debates that emerge out of three provacative collections that have been tremendously influential in reshaping the ways that scholars have approached U.S. empire. We move from a consideration of how slavery, the American Indian question and immigration all figured the nation as an imperial space, through the reshaping of gender and race in the imperial area as the U.S. first emerged as a global power, to the eventual development of a project of global domination through modernization and development that increasingly replaced Western domination through direct colonialism. We will further explore the enormity and originality of these efforts through considering a range of texts on the post-45 era. Taking a broad and eclectic approach to the study of empire, we will ask how these works help us reshape a somewhat older set of questions: what do we gain by viewing U.S. imperialism not primarily through the lens of individual policymakers or administrations, but rather, through asking how it was created or constructed in the broader arena of political culture. How were ideas and events shaped by American culture, how were they explained and promoted at home and around the world, and how did they vary from one historical context to another? How have the interlocking ideologies of imperialism, race, and gender animated U.S. expansion and shaped the political culture and consciousness of American society? Finally, we will test and interrogate the new directions taken in studies of U.S. imperialism by a select but careful methodological comaprison with works not focused on the U.S. arena, inclusing works by Benedict Anderson and Arif Dirlik. Syllabi are available in the History department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 608. Studies in Chinese Historiography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chun-shu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 615. Introduction to the Comparative Study of History.

Section 001 Intro to Comparative Studies: Theories & Practices

Instructor(s): Kali Israel (kisrael@umich.edu), Stephanie Platz (splatz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on the historical craft, its methods, practices, and theories. We will read a selection of theoretical writings that have been influential in recent historiography. More crucially, we will read a diverse array of historical monographs from different times and world regions. In our meetings, we intend to discuss how historians shape their narratives, which methodological and theoretical tools they employ, and how we can engage historical writings intellectually. Finally, several jointly held seminar meetings will introduce students to history faculty and distinguished visitors (section 1 and 2). If desired, extra events will familiarize students with research opportunities on campus.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

History 615. Introduction to the Comparative Study of History.

Section 002 Intro to Comparative Studies: Theories & Practices

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Eley (ghe@umich.edu), Regina Morantz-Sanchez (regiann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on the historical craft, its methods, practices, and theories. We will read a selection of theoretical writings that have been influential in recent historiography. More crucially, we will read a diverse array of historical monographs from different times and world regions. In our meetings, we intend to discuss how historians shape their narratives, which methodological and theoretical tools they employ, and how we can engage historical writings intellectually. Finally, several jointly held seminar meetings will introduce students to history faculty and distinguished visitors (section 1 and 2). If desired, extra events will familiarize students with research opportunities on campus.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

History 617/LACS 619/Anthro. 619. Proseminar on Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Section 001 State and Nation.

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Latin American and Caribbean Studies 619.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 625. Studies in Balkan History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Fine

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 629/AAS 629. Studies in African History.

Section 001 Literature in the Social Sciences and History written by and about Africans During the Era of Struggles over Decolonization (1930's-1980's).

Instructor(s): Frederick Cooper (fcooper@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/F00/HS629/index.html

This readings course introduces graduate students to the major literature in the field. In Fall 2000, this course will focus on literature in the social sciences and history written by and about Africans during the era of struggles over decolonization, from the late 1930s through the 1980s. It will stress how political ferment produced new categories and modes of analysis in scholarly literature and how scholarly literature opened new questions about social and political policy. Works to be read include path-breaking books like Jomo Kenyatta, Facing Mount Kenya (1938), K. Onwuka Dike, Trade and Politics on the Niger Delta (1956), Georges Balandier's 1951 article "The Colonial Situation" and political studies from the 1950s, writings by such African scholars as Cheikh Anta Diop and B. A. Ogot, the first anthropological studies of Africans in wage labor and urban situations, collections of essays from the 1960s about the emergence of African history as a discipline, and critical works that moved beyond nationalist historiography toward a critical engagement with Africa's place in world-wide economic relations (by Walter Rodney and Samir Amin), and selections on the social history of South Africa. Reading from the periods in question will at times be juxtaposed with more recent scholarship that brings out the new contexts in which intellectuals were trying to reconfigure scholarly categories, as well as historiographical analyses from different eras. In addition to doing common reading, students will be given ample opportunities to pursue projects of their own design.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 637/Information 637. Problems in the Administration of Archives.

Section 001 Memory and the role of Archives as Memory Institutions.

Instructor(s): Eric Ketelaar

Prerequisites & Distribution: History 600; Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/si/si/637/001.nsf

Thematic focus of this research seminar is collective memory and the role of archives as "memory institutions." In the seminar, students examine the role of archives and archivists in shaping memory through appraisal and selection, creation and collection of oral history, and interpretation and display of documentary evidence. Most of the readings place archives in the context of a broader literature on memory and interpretation of the past, including comparisons between archives and other memory institutions, such as museums.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 640. Studies in Early Modern European History.

Section 001 Mapping the Pre-Modern World

Instructor(s): Diane Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Reading knowledge of one European language. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 640. Studies in Early Modern European History.

Section 002 Consumption, Fashion & Taste in Early Modern Europe

Instructor(s): Dena Goodman (goodmand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Reading knowledge of one European language. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/inteflex/211/001.nsf

This studies course will explore the culture of early modern Europe in terms of its changing relationship to worldly goods. We will begin by discussing the implications of the historiographical shift among (primarily British) historians from a focus on production to one on consumption that began in the 1980s. As historians of the French Revolution have come to focus on the culture of the revolution itself, rather than simply its causes or effects, we will look at the culture of what some historicans are now calling the "Consumer Revolution." We will focus on the development of new discourses of fashion and taste in relation to older concepts of luxury and necessity to make sense of a world in which new goods from new worlds were flooding the market. But we will also look at the ways in which cultural practices such as advertising, branding, and shopping developed within and through these discourses. Readings will be in European cultural history from the Renaissance to the French Revolution, including works by John Brewer, Lisa Jardine, Simon Schama, Amanda Vickery, and Daniel Roche, with an emphasis on the eighteenth century. Topics to be explored may include the role of the exotic, the meaning of novelty, and the uses of print. Questions to be explored may include: How was the relationship between culture and things constructed between 1500 and 1800 to give new meaning to both? What did it mean to live through the Consumer Revolution? How broad was its impact and how deeply into the social fabric did it cut? How did gender figure in both the cultural debates and the cultural practices surrounding the Consumer Revolution? How does the work of the historians we are reading contribute to a revision of social historical and Marxist understandings of the rise of capitalism and a global economy, the Enlightenment, and the beginnings of modernity? What are the implications for economic history as well as social and cultural history?

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History 641. Studies in 20th Century European History.

Section 001 Cultures & Citizenships in Wilhelmine & Weimar Germany

Instructor(s): Kathleen Canning (kcanning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 645. Problems of Russian Society.

Section 001 Problems in the History of Russian Society: Polity, Belief and Affiliation from Muscovy to the Present. (Credits ?).

Instructor(s): Jane Burbank (jburbank@umich.edu) , Valerie Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (2-4).

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How have people living on the Eurasian territories claimed by the leaders of Muscovy, Imperial Russia, the Soviet Union, and the Russian Federation imagined their relations with each other and with these polities? This course explores understandings and practices of affiliation on "Russian" lands. Discussions will be based on readings of secondary sources, with attention to interpretation of primary documents. Our inquiry will focus on three themes: locality, collectivity, and belief. The course cuts across the usual teleological and chronological frames and offers alternative ways of reading Russian history. A speaker series will be attached to the course. Requirements: active participation in discussions, one-page responses to readings, one book review, one document analysis, one review essay or a prospectus for a seminar paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 668/Chinese 668. Studies in Early Chinese History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chung-shu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing; Upperclassmen with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 674. Studies in Modern Asia Southeast.

Section 001 Modern Southeast Asia: Prison & Exile

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrazek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing, Juniors or seniors with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The theme of the seminar will be exile and prison as self-contained cultures in colonial and post-colonial Southeast Asia. Politics and culture of the area will be studied in terms of prison and exile experiences. Each student will be required to produce a full-length research paper on a topic relevant to the theme of the seminar. Students of history, anthropology, literary theory, and/or Asian Studies, are invited; those students are especially welcomed who are interested in moving between two or more of these fields.

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History 676. Studies in Modern Japanese History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leslie Pincus (lpincus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 683. Studies in the United States History: 1815-1865.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mills Thornton (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 686/Amer. Cult. 686. Studies in American Cultural History.

Section 001 The American West

Instructor(s): Maria Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is a one-semester introduction to the history of the American West from the colonial era to the present. It assumes no previous course work in the field, and students with a wide variety of backgrounds are encouraged to participate. You may find it difficult to keep up, however, if you are completely unfamiliar. If you have concerns, then please see me before the course gets into full swing. We will read a few of the most important works that historians have produced in the last twenty years. This course, however, only covers selected topics and you are welcome to explore others on your own. (Montoya)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 688. Studies in Twentieth-Century American History.

Section 001 Suburbanization/Urban Crisis

Instructor(s): Matthew Lassiter

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Readings in Twentieth-Century U.S. urban/suburban history, from the Great Migration through contemporary policy debates, with emphasis on the post-1940 period. Central themes include the tensions within and breakdown of the New Deal Order, the interplay between national policy and local dynamics, the power shift from Rust Belt to Sunbelt, and the role of market forces, private action, and public policy in metropolitan development. Various methodological approaches will be employed to probe the intersection of race, ethnicity, class, gender, neighborhood, and grassroots protest on the landscape of metropolitan America. Did the same forces which built the sprawling suburbs also produce the Urban Crisis? How does a metropolitan, spatial approach to postwar America reconsider standard interpretations of class consciousness, political realignment, and racial identity? Case studies include Los Angeles, Boston, Atlanta, Chicago, and Detroit; policy studies include the urban civil rights movement, the New Deal/Cold War reconstruction of the American Dream, the Great Society and the showdown over redistributive liberalism, and the emerging Edge City/Sunbelt/Suburban Sprawl synthesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 698. Topics in History.

Section 001 Archives, Documents & Institutions of Social Memory. Meets with Information 617.001.

Instructor(s): Francis Blouin (fblouin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Course is the featured offering in the Center for Advanced Study in the International Institute and is offered jointly by the School of Information and the Department of History. This special course is supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Students will be engaged in a discussion of a broad array of issues related to archives and concepts of social memory. The seminar will include public lectures and informal discussions that are also part of the year-long seminar, "Archives, Documentation, and the Institutions of Social Memory," that will be held at the University of Michigan during 2000-01. Scholars from around the world will address topics related to archives and social memory.

The seminar will investigate the complex relationships between archives, forms of documentation, and the ways societies remember their pasts. Archives are approached as a complex of structures, processes, and epistemologies situated at a critical intersection between scholarship, cultural practices, politics, and technologies. Archives are viewed as institutions that help define what is both "knowable" and known about the past. Archives produce knowledge, legitimize political systems, construct identities, and actively create or re-create social memory.

The course explores these issues from comparative, global, and multidisciplinary perspectives. It will join questions of archival acquisition and preservation to those of historical understanding, identity formation, and architectural monumentality, engaging scholars and archivists from a variety of disciplines and locations. The seminar also addresses the ways in which dramatic new technologies are changing the nature of "documents," and ultimately the substance and form of social memory itself.

Other Notes: Course is limited to 15 master's and doctoral students and runs through winter 2001 academic term. Attendance for both academic terms is required.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

History 700. Independent Research Seminar.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 719. Seminar in Modern European History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laura Lee Downs (bombe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 761. Seminar in Early American History.

Section 001 Techniques and Trends in the Writing of Early American History.

Instructor(s): David Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The research seminar examines techniques and trends in the writing of early American history. Emphasis will be placed on introducing and familiarizing the graduate student with different topics currently the focus of intense debate in the field of colonial history, and on discussing the historical sources for such debate and the techniques used in interpreting them. The first few weeks will address in depth the matter of finding materials both through published and electronic guides and through Michigan-area manuscript collections (Clements, Bentley, the Burton Historical Collection, and Colonial Detroit); that is, the question of how to locate primary documents for historical research. The subsequent four weeks will provide a small window into what to do with those documents; there will be four small-scale analyses, where an article or book that deploys a certain interpretative technique is juxtaposed with a set of documents which the student must analyze using the tool or technique in question. The remainder of the term is devoted to pursuing one's own research, under the supervision of Professor Hancock. That research will culminate in a research paper based on hitherto unused primary sources, that will be presented to the seminar at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 791. Seminar in Hispanic-American History.

Section 001 History of Latin America & the Caribbean

Instructor(s): Rebecca Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Reading knowledge of Spanish. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 801. Reading Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 803. Reading for the General Examination.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 812. Seminar on History Pedagogy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Second-year graduate standing or higher. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~baporter/syl81200.html

The goal of this class is simple: to make you a better teacher, and to prepare you for the rigors of running your own college-level history class. We will deal with practical, "how-to" issues of course management, lecture writing, grading, etc., and explore some of the broader issues and controversies about the pedagogical side of the historical profession. We will start with the big picture: how to design a course, select readings, prepare a syllabus, and generally get ready for that first day in the classroom. Next, we will build on your own experiences as GSIs while examining the seminar format. We will share advice about identifying the goals of a discussion, structuring a conversation, coping with silence, nurturing the shy while managing the garrulous, and more. A major segment of the course will be devoted to the one aspect of teaching which graduate students are rarely prepared for: the lecture. We will see how successful lecturers prepare their presentations, use visual aids and multimedia, balance the competing demands of clarity and complexity, and keep students awake. Finally, we will talk about the current condition and future prospects of higher education in history, so as to familiarize you with some of the most prominent debates in this field.

Grading will be based on two projects. First, by October 23 each of you must hand in a syllabus for a course you expect to teach. This may be a proposed syllabus for a freshman seminar here at the University of Michigan, or a draft for a survey course you might offer during your first year of post-doctoral teaching. The syllabus must contain a reading list, a short summary of the objectives or themes of the course, grading requirements, and a schedule of lecture/discussion topics and assignment due-dates. The second requirement for this course is for every student to offer one undergraduate lecture. The specifics of this project will depend on how many students enroll in the class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 825/Anthro. 825/Chinese 825/Econ. 825/Pol. Sci. 825/Soc. 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A course for students working on special research projects in Asian history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 898. Dissertation Colloquium Candidacy.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 900. Preparation for Preliminary Examinations.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Normally to be taken only in the term in which a student plans to take his general preliminary examinations. Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

History 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Valerie Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

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