College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in History of Art (Division 392)

This page was created at 7:57 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in History of Art

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTART

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for History of Art.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in History of Art this week go to What's New This Week.


Hist. Art 401/AAPTIS 401. The Art and Architecture of Armenia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christina Maranci

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/401-001.html

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 401.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 415/WS 415. Studies in Gender and the Arts.

Section 001 Women and Gender in Roman Art and Cult: the Villa of the Mysteries At Pompeii.

Instructor(s): Elaine Gazda (gazda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and one course in women's studies or history of art. (3).May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/415-001.html

This course will examine issues that relate to the social roles, religious practices and personal aspirations of the women of Roman Italy, especially those who lived in the multicultural region of the Bay of Naples. The famous painting cycle in the Villa of the Mysteries at Pompeii will serve as a point of departure for class discussions and research projects. The imagery of this cycle raises questions about the construction of gender in the realms of real life and mythology to be addressed by the class as well. This course will make extensive use of a special exhibition at the Kelsey Museum and the Museum of Art, "The Villa of the Mysteries in Pompeii: Ancient Ritual, Modern Muse," which will provide an opportunity to consider issues of concern to the women of antiquity in relation to those that concern women today. The catalog of the exhibition will serve as a textbook for the course. It will be supplemented by a course pack and reserve readings. Class presentations, a research project, and attendance at a weekend conference on the exhibition are required. There will be an optional final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 433/Class. Arch. 433. Greek Sculpture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Pedley (jpedley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 101. (3).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/433-001.html

See Classical Archaeology 433.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 440/Class. Arch. 440. Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece.

Section 001 The Topography of Athens

Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou (papalexa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology. (3).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/440-001.html

See Classical Archaeology 440.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 442/Class. Arch. 442. Late Antique and Early Christian Art and Architecture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Amy Papalexandrou (apapalex@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 101 or 222. (3).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/442-001.html

Long considered a "degenerate" phase in the history of art and architecture, the complex and intriguing world of Late Antiquity is lately being analyzed in a new and refreshingly positive light. This course is designed to follow this direction, and to offer a comprehensive and in-depth look at the Mediterranean world at the "end" of Roman antiquity. "End" because the ancient world was far from dead; the Greco-Roman heritage was to live on for centuries, gradually mingling with the emerging Christian culture but never completely subsumed by it. It is a period of crisis and redefinition, of spectacular transformation within a cultural framework deeply indebted to its pagan past while simultaneously recast in the garb of Christianity. The slow decay of Rome and the founding and embellishment of Constantinople, Constantine's stunning new city on the Bosphorus, underscore this social and cultural upheaval as do the many other phenomena which will concern us. A few of the themes to be addressed include the emperor mystique; enlightened "barbarians"; the changing image of city and palace; the sacred image; monks and monasteries; life (and death) at the tomb; art and religion in a multicultural empire; the cult of relics; and pilgrimage. We will examine works of art as well as architecture, some of which will be familiar but others of which lie outside the canon of monuments normally discussed in survey courses, all in the hope of gaining a clearer understanding of this dynamic, if often overlooked, period from the third to the sixth century AD.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 463. Varieties of Dutch and Flemish Painting.

Section 001 Pictorial Art and Visual Culture in the Dutch Republic.

Instructor(s): Celeste Brusati (cbrusati@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 102 and 260. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/463-001.html

This course deals with the pictorial art and visual culture of the Netherlands during the seventeenth century. We will be looking primarily at painting, but also at drawings and prints, to examine the diversity and types of images produced, and to situate them within their historical and cultural circumstances. The course will give special emphasis to the illusionistic and descriptive artistry for which Dutch and Flemish artists were justly famous. It will explore the character and meanings of this art's celebrated naturalism, and will consider the social, political, and ideological functions of pictures, the status of art and artists, and the conditions of artistic production and consumption in the Dutch Republic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 473. Twentieth-Century Architecture.

Section 001 Meets with Architecture 543.001.

Instructor(s): Anatole Senkevitch (senkanat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 102. (3). Rackham credit with additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/473-001.html

The course offers a critical examination of the transformations in architectural theory and practice from the late 19th through the 20th century, with emphasis on elucidating the leading struggles for definition, meaning, and form in the architecture of this period. Also considered is the link between theory and practice; the relationship between conceptual and aesthetic as well as technical factors; and the cultural, economic, social, and political context out of which they evolved.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 481/Class. Arch. 481. Art of Ancient Iran.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 101. (3).Rackham credit requires additional work.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/481-001.html

This course explores the visual arts of ancient Iran from late prehistoric times to the Islamic conquest. It offers students a broad overview of Iranian cultural heritage emphasizing major trends in art and architecture, tied closely to exploration of some of the most spectacular and intriguing sites of antiquity including Susa, Persepolis, and Bishapur. The course pays special attention to studies of seals, luxury vessels, and programs of palace sculpture and rock relief. Using these categories of art production, we will analyze what they can tell us about social, spiritual, economic, and political messages of the visual environment of Iran across successive eras. While the material has a great intrinsic integrity and importance, it is also useful for students of, e.g., Greek and Roman studies or Islamic studies as a backdrop for comparative purposes on a variety of agendas (e.g., problems in the art and archaeology of empire).

This is a slide-lecture course which also features in-class group work and discussion around actual artifacts. An optional but highly recommended class trip to Chicago's famed Oriental Institute (which excavated Persepolis in the 1930s) is planned. Course requirements: one brief (2 pp. max., double-spaced) descriptive paper on an artifact, one 2 pp. project proposal for term paper, one term paper (12-15 pp.), two in-class quizzes, attendance and participation in class discussion of weekly class readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 514. Spanish Art: El Greco to Goya.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 102. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/514-001.html

Beginning with lectures that formulate a notion of the spiritual bond between apparently dissimilar works of Spanish art, the course passes to in-depth analyses of selected major Spanish painters from the late 16th to the early 19th C. Religious imagery, genre, still life, portraits, mythology, and landscapes by such masters as El Greco, Ribalta, Ribera, Velázquez, Zurbaran, Murillo, and Goya will be featured. Along the way we will confront and attempt to explain extraordinary expressive extremes, from the explosively passionate to the dream-like, from the brutal to the graceful, from the chaste to the decorative, from realism to idealism. The cultural/historical situations, the creative uniqueness, and yet the essential "Spanishness" of each of these artists will be explored. The text (J. Brown, The Golden Age of Painting in Spain, 1991) will be supplemented by other readings, and students will be evaluated on the bases of midterm and final exams of essay type.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 600. Independent Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Approval of graduate advisor. Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Hist. Art 615. First Year Graduate Seminar.

Section 001 HISTORY OF ART IN THE MAKING: PROBLEMS & PRACTICES PAST & PRESENT

Instructor(s): Howard Lay (hglay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/615-001.html

No Description Provided

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Hist. Art 646. Problems in Medieval Art.

Section 001 Arts of Aquitaine

Instructor(s): Robert Maxwell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/646-001.html

Of medieval Europe's many rich regions, western France stands apart for the breadth and quality of its artistic patrimony. The abundance of its Romanesque and early Gothic architecture and sculpture is unparalleled; its troubadour lyrics and legendary songsters remain among the most popular of medieval French literature; its courtly ideals and royal patrons, including Jean de Berry, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Henry II of England and Richard the Lionhearted, were among the most charismatic and influential; and its political affiliations, vacillating between England and Paris (including Crusader rule over Cyprus), were decisive for the future of the French state.

This course focuses on the intersections of these and other cultural discourses, paying particular attention to their visual expression. We will cast our net widely, treating subjects as diverse as female piety and hagiography, bastides and urbanism, pilgrimage and crusades, Romance literature and manuscript illumination, folklore and history making, rulership and chivalry. We will return to Aquitaine's roots as a province of the Roman Empire and also examine its Merovingian and Carolingian legacies. Special attention, however, will be given to the high and late Middle Ages, the period that witnessed Aquitaine's advent as a major cultural center. Students of history and Romance languages are especially welcome. Reading knowledge of French is strongly recommended.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 666. Problems in 17th Century Art and Visual Culture.

Section 001 Pictorial Print Culture in Netherlandish Art.

Instructor(s): Celeste Brusati (cbrusati@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/666-001.html

No Description Provided

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Hist. Art 677. Studies in American Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Hist. Art 690/Chinese 695. Topics in the Theory and Criticism of Chinese Art.

Section 001 Text and Image in Early Modern China.

Instructor(s): Powers

Prerequisites & Distribution: One 400-level or higher course in Chinese art history and 2 years Chinese language. Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/690-001.html

This course aims to consider text and image issues in comparative perspective with a view to "rescuing history from the nation." It is designed to help students develop a sense of both the advantages and potential pitfalls of explicit comparative research (all historical writing is comparative by nature) by exploring how certain initial assumptions, material conditions, social constraints or canon formation could foster different pictorial strategies historically. The primary focus of discussion will be painting and poetry. Just as the literature of "Ut Pictura Poesis" developed in Classical and early modern Europe, so did theories about picturing the verbal develop in Classical and early modern China. Some of these theories emphasized pictorial description, others privileged imagery, still others metaphor, bodily movement and so on, each with its own premises regarding the the nature of emotion, the role of the artist, and protocols of artistic appreciation. In order to counter national-character readings of this material, we will examine studies of comparable developments outside of China, mainly early modern Europe.

Students will prepare short, written comments on readings and write a research paper. The latter includes delivering a progress report early in the term, presenting a 20 minute talk later in the term and finally working that talk into a term paper. Readings will include essays by Norman Bryson, Prasenjit Duara, Lydia Liu, W.J.T. Mitchell, Stephen Owen, and David Summers among others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 694. Special Studies in the Art of China.

Section 001 SOCIAL PROTOCOLS IN ART: SIGNATURES, TITLES, INSCRIPTIONS, FORMAT.

Instructor(s): Powers

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Hist. Art 700. Independent Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Approval of graduate advisor. Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Hist. Art 772. Problems in Modern Art.

Section 001 Modernism/Mass Culture Am Art

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/772-001.html

The intricate tango between modern art and popular, mass, or commercial culture has taken on particular meanings in the United States, where popular culture is considered part of national identity. This class will examine a series of twentieth-century artists who adapted, created or commented on popular forms, and the dialogic process of artistic transmission. It will consider how both high and low art forms have participated in the creation of changing cultural hierarchies at home, and with projecting an image of American abroad. Among the figures and topics we will study are New York Dada, the depiction of modern art in comic with projecting an image of American abroad. Among the figures and topics we will study are New York Dada, the depiction of modern art in comic strips and animated cartoons, Gerald Murphy, Florine Stettheimer, the surrealist impresario Julien Levy, and the defenders and detractors of Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. We will also read current and period theoretical writings on aesthetics and mass culture. Students will prepare one brief in-class report and paper based on reading and one research papers, and will occasionally take responsibility for leading class discussion. Students in a variety of disciplines including comparative literature, history, romance languages, American culture, and the Schools of Art and Design and Architecture and Urban Planning are encouraged to participate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 772. Problems in Modern Art.

Section 002 High and Low: Modernism and Mass Culture in American Art.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/772-001.html

The intricate tango between modern art and popular, mass, or commercial culture has taken on particular meanings in the United States, where popular culture is considered part of national identity. This class will examine a series of twentieth-century artists who adapted, created or commented on popular forms, and the dialogic process of artistic transmission. It will consider how both high and low art forms have participated in the creation of changing cultural hierarchies at home, and with projecting an image of American abroad. Among the figures and topics we will study are New York Dada, the depiction of modern art in comic with projecting an image of American abroad. Among the figures and topics we will study are New York Dada, the depiction of modern art in comic strips and animated cartoons, Gerald Murphy, Florine Stettheimer, the surrealist impresario Julien Levy, and the defenders and detractors of Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. We will also read current and period theoretical writings on aesthetics and mass culture. Students will prepare one brief in-class report and paper based on reading and one research papers, and will occasionally take responsibility for leading class discussion. Students in a variety of disciplines including comparative literature, history, romance languages, American culture, and the Schools of Art and Design and Architecture and Urban Planning are encouraged to participate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 773. Problems in Art of the Twentieth Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gough

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Hist. Art 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Hist. Art 993. GSI Training.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Sears (esears@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Hist. Art 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

This page was created at 7:57 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.


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