College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Japanese (Division 401)

This page was created at 7:58 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Japanese

Wolverine Access Subject listing for JAPANESE

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Japanese.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Japanese this week go to What's New This Week.


Japanese 401/Asian Studies 401/Women's Studies 401. Writing Japanese Women.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Sections 001 through 004 meet the Upper-Level Writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Esperanza Ramirez-Christensen (qmz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a course on writing by and about women women's self-representation and men's representations of women in Japanese culture. It begins by a feminist reading of one of the world's oldest (9th-11th c.) traditions of women's writing: the memoirs, poetry, and fiction of the Heian court ladies who produced the country's first canonical literature and permanently marked its cultural self-image. It moves on to examine the semiotics of the feminine in Japanese culture using the popular image of women (including the Heian authors and their works) in medieval didactic and gothic tales; in the narrative painting scrolls; in the No and Kabuki stage, where male actors performed the "quintessentially feminine" to admiring audiences; in wood-block prints of "beauties" (courtesans or geisha) and stories of "amorous women" in the thriving new merchant culture. The third section focuses on modern women's writing, in particular its resistance to the intervening representations of the feminine and its own productive rereading of the Heian "mothers" in the process of reviving women's ancient place in the critical representation of Japanese society. Along with primary sources in literature and the visual arts, secondary sources will include theoretical readings in the psychology of sex, love, and death by Freud, Kristeva, Lacan, and Bataille; in the field of cultural production by Bourdieu; in feminist theories of reading in the Anglo-American academy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Japanese 405. Third-Year Japanese.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Shoko Emori (semori@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 202 or 362. Native or near-native speakers of Japanese are not eligible for this course.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($9) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/japanese/J3rd/index.html

This course is designed for students who have completed Japanese 202 with a grade of C- or better or have passed the placement test. The course consists of lecture and recitation classes. Developing reading skills is the main focus of the lectures. Reading materials are selected from the textbook. In association with the reading materials, complex sentences will be analyzed in terms of basic grammar, new vocabulary and expressions will be acquired, and you will be introduced to numerous aspects of Japanese culture. In recitation, the focus is placed on exchanging thoughts and opinions after practicing the use of new and old expressions, vocabulary, and grammatical patterns that are related to the reading materials. Most writing and listening exercises will be done outside of class through homework. Text: An Integrated Approach to Intermediate Japanese. Tokyo: Japan Times, 1997.

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Japanese 416. Communicative Competence for Japan-Oriented Careers.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yashiro Omoto (yomoto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 406, 411; and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/japanese/J4th_bus/416.html

Commonly known as Business Japanese, this course stresses the effective use of the Japanese spoken language in contexts likely to be encountered by a career-oriented professional in Japan. Topics include: Organization, Business Travel, Meetings, Bureaucracy, Distribution, Expansion, Annual Reports, Business Ritual and Socializing. In addition, the course will include practice in rapid reading and transcription/dictation of moderately difficult texts, newspaper articles, and news broadcasts. Students are expected to practice with audio tapes for a minimum of two hours for each class hour. Since this is a late addition to the course guide, the days and times of this class are currently listed "to be arranged". There will be an organizational meeting the first week of school to decide on a meeting time.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Japanese 451. Fourth-Year Japanese I.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Misao Kozuka (misakozu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 406. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of the course is the acquisition of linguistic, pragmatic, and sociocultural competence in all four skills in advanced level. A TV drama is used as the main textbook with the focus on the improvement of speaking and listening competence, and variety of reading materials on Japanese sociocultural issues that are related to the content of TV drama are used to further develop reading and writing skills. The two-hour class period is conducted to the verification and discussion of the drama content, use of new vocabulary and expressions as well as the acquisition of more complex, advanced grammar pattern usages. The techniques of improving reading skill is taught during the class period, and the actual reading of the materials and writing of the reaction papers will be assigned as homework.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Japanese 490. Introduction to Japanese Linguistics.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yuki Johnson (yukijohn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 202. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/japanese/J490/J490/JPN490.html

This course is designed for both undergraduate (prerequisite is required) and graduate students who are interested in acquiring the specifics of Japanese grammar. It is also recommended for anyone considering a career as a teacher of Japanese. The goals of the course are: to gain knowledge of the basic characteristics of sentence structure and meaning in Japanese; to become familiar with selected theoretical analyses (or competing analyses) which linguists have proposed for various structural patterns in Japanese; and to develop a repertoire of linguistic vocabulary with which to talk about sentence structure and meaning in Japanese.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Japanese 541. Classical Japanese.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Esperanza Ramirez-Christensen (qmz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 406 and 408. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to the classical language aimed at mastery of the basic vocabulary, grammar, and syntax necessary to read all Japanese writing, literary or otherwise, before the twentieth century. A reading knowledge of modern Japanese (equivalent to three years of study) is a prerequisite. Class meetings are devoted to close syntactic analysis and translation of samples from various classical texts, with particular emphasis on poetry and narrative from the Heian and medieval periods. This course is required of all graduate concentrators in Japanese and is a prerequisite (with Japanese 542) to advanced work in pre- and early modern Japanese texts. It is also highly recommended to graduate students of premodern Japanese history, art history, Buddhism, etc. It may also be taken by undergraduate students with sufficient preparation in the modern language.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

Japanese 552. Medieval Japanese Prose.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses in Japanese

Section 001 Poetics of the Sublime.

Instructor(s): Esperanza Ramirez-Christensen (qmz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 542. (3).May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Readings in the various prose genres of the medieval period (1200-1600), including gunki monogatari or warrior epics, setsuwa stories from the oral tradition, essays, travel journals, and religious writing. The seminars will take up issues of historicity and conflicts of interpretation regarding the accounts of the Genpei civil wars and the way of the samurai; religious ideology and gender in the popular storytelling tradition; intertextuality and conformation; and the emergence of a classical aesthetics. Offered in the fall academic term alternately with Japanese 551.

The Fall 2000 seminar will focus on the medieval discourses on poetry and Nô performance that shaped the enduring sense of the Japanese sublime in such articulations as mono no aware (the moving power of things), yûgen (ineffable depth), and sabi (austere loneliness); we will relate the notion of the sublime to phenomenological issues of language, mind and the nonduality of subject/object, and examine the concept of cultural practice as a michi (Way) or a pedagogy of the mind.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Japanese 554. Modern Japanese Literature.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses in Japanese

Section 001 Cultures of Defeat: Fiction of the Occupation Period.

Instructor(s): Ken Ito (kenkito@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 406 and 408. (3).May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is inspired by the publication of John Dower's magisterial history of the Occupation, Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II (Norton, 1999). With Dower's book, we now have a cultural history for these years of despair and transformation. This seminar will read fictional works written between 1945 and 1952 contrapuntally against Dower's account of the Occupation. The effort will be to explore the relationship between fiction and the larger discourses of the period and to see how writers responded to the forced postwar reconfigurations of not only national identity but also identities of gender, class, and sexual orientation. The reading will consist of major works by Dazai Osamu, Sakaguchi Ango, Tamura Taijirô, Hara Tamiki, Ooka Shohei, Mishima Yukio, Kawabata Yasunari, Hayashi Fumiko, and other writers of the period. The seminar requires reading knowledge of Japanese.

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Japanese 556. Japanese Drama and Narrative Performance.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001 Japan's "Epic" Tale: The Heike in Music and Drama. Meets with Music History/Musicology 728.001.

Instructor(s): Hugh De Ferranti (hbd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3).May be repeated three times for a total of nine credits. May not be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Musical narrative was at the core of Japanese performance culture until the post-war era. Fired by the artistry of itinerant blind singers, the oral and musical virtuosity of popular chanters, and the spectacle of the no, kyogen, kabuki and puppet theaters, public enthusiasm for historical tales in performance was strong at all levels of society from the medieval period until the mid-20th century. The body of stories most often drawn upon was that which concerned the downfall of the Heike clan and related events of the 1180s, as compiled in the Tale of Heike. As such, the corpus of Heike stories has been as significant a formative agent in Japanese culture as have the epic tales of the Mahabarata and Ramayana in south and south-east Asian cultures, the Romance of the Three Kingdoms in Imperial China, and the Sunjata tales in Manding West Africa.

As a seminar for students of Japanese culture and musicology, respectively, this course will combine essential perspectives for study of the performing arts in context. In examining the presentation of Heike stories in performance media characteristic of various eras from the 14th to the early 20th centuries, we will consider the creative practices of both musicians and authors of written texts, and the cultural practice of performance itself as a social institution in which "the Heike" has been re-cast under changing historical circumstances.

Weekly coursework will involve core readings in English, as well as viewing or listening preparation, for which translations and transliterations will be provided. Extra readings and listening assignments will be presented in each session and will be tailored to the profiles of seminar participants, so that Japanese sources can be assigned to those students with reading ability and materials requiring musicological skills to those from the Music program. It will also be possible for students from both sides of the divide to collaborate in production of term papers that incorporate the tools of both disciplines in application to specific repertory items.

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Japanese 601. Master's Essay.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Japanese 699. Directed Readings and Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Restricted to department majors. Permission of graduate adviser. Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Japanese 799. Master's Essay in Japanese Language and Literature.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Master's student in Asian Languages and Cultures: Japanese Language and Literature. Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Japanese 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Japanese 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. I Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

This page was created at 7:58 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.


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