College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Latin (Division 411)

This page was created at 7:59 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Latin

Wolverine Access Subject listing for LATIN

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Latin.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Latin this week go to What's New This Week.


Latin 401. Republican Prose.

Intermediate Courses

Section 001 Sallust

Instructor(s): Sabine MacCormack (sgm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Latin 301 or 302. (3).May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We begin by going through the text of Sallust, concentrating on Catilina and Jugurtha, and paying special attention to the manner in which statements in the prefaces to the two works are borne out in subsequent narrative. We will then go on to place Sallust within the tradition of Roman historical writing by examining parallel accounts by other ancient historians of Rome, in particular Livy. One of Sallust's most intelligent ancient readers was Saint Augustine. We will therefore conclude with Augustine's interpretations of Sallust, and while doing so will consider selected fragments of the Histories.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Latin 409. Augustan Poetry.

Intermediate Courses

Section 001 Aspects of Ovidian Elegy.

Instructor(s): Rob Sklenar (rsklenar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Latin 301 or 302. (3).May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will read Book 1 of Ovid's Ars Amatoria 1 and Book 1 of Ovid's Tristia in their entirety; additional works of Ovid may be assigned as time permits. Primary emphasis will be on the strengthening of philological skills through intensive translation and close analysis of grammatical and metrical problems, but literary-critical issues will be comfortably accommodated. These will include, but not be limited to: Ovid's varying and contrasting uses of the elegiac form; the Ovidian authorial persona(e); the book of short poems as a unitary structure; Ovid's engagement with other Latin poets. Midterm, final, and short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Latin 421/EducationD 421. Teaching of Latin.

Advanced Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): D.P. Ross (dpross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing in Latin and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A workshop-type course designed to provide prospective secondary and college teachers with the skills necessary to analyze structures and texts and to design instructional materials and class presentations. The course will also introduce the students to those aspects of modern linguistic theories that have practical application to teaching and learning Latin.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Latin 426. Practicum.

Advanced Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): D.P. Ross (dpross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Permission of the instructor is required to elect Latin 426. Students must submit a plan for a project related to the teaching of Latin. The course is designed for students who wish to continue work begun in Latin 421.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Latin 435/MEMS 440. Medieval Latin I, 500-900 A.D.

Advanced Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles Witke (frchas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two years of college Latin. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey of the major developments in Latin prose and poetry from A.D. 500-900. Attention will be paid to the changes in Latin grammar, syntax, and orthography. Texts read include monastic rules, saints' lives, history, and poetry. Midterm, final, one short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Latin 445. Tacitus, Histories.

Advanced Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Frier (bwfrier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will read, as time permits, the first several books of Tacitus' Annals, which describe the growing tension between the Emperor Tiberius and his nephew Germanicus. No special background is required beyond an advanced intermediate level of Latin. One midterm, final; several short papers on related topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Latin 499. Latin: Supervised Reading.

Advanced Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4).May not be included in a concentration plan in Greek Language and Literature or Classical Languages and Literatures. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Regular reports and conferences required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Latin 502. Rapid Beginning Latin.

Graduate Courses

Meets with Latin 193.

Instructor(s): Rob Sklenar (rsklenar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a rapid introduction to Latin and is intended for students with little or no prior Latin. Upperclass undergraduates in such fields as history, medieval or renaissance literature, or linguistics and who need to acquire a reading competence in Latin as quickly and as efficiently as possible should elect this course. So should other undergraduates who intend to continue the study of Latin and want a rapid introduction that enables them to take upper-level Latin courses as soon as possible. This first-term course covers elementary grammar and syntax.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Latin 506. Advanced Latin Composition.

Advanced Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): K. A. Garbrah (kagarbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Latin 403. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Latin 581. Lucretius and Roman Epicureanism.

Advanced Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Porter (jport@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Latin 401. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jport/courses/classics/Lucretius.html

This course will be an introduction to the writing and thought of Lucretius. The versifier of Epicurus' prose treatise, On Nature, Lucretius is a fascinating interpreter of a fascinating philosophical doctrine, atomism. We will be exploring some of the many challenges his work involves: from the problem of how to make the spectacle of atoms and void relevant to life as we know it, to the problem of literary and cultural translation the translation of one cultural experience, a Greek philosophy (or rather tradition of philosophical speculation), and its social contexts, into another, that of Republican Rome in an age of civic crisis (whence some of the egestas linguae et rerum novitas of his poem). When we put these two facets together we arrive at a single puzzle: at one level Lucretius is a case study in the forging of (nascent) Roman identity; at another, he challenges any intuitive notions of what counts as an identity (if, for instance, everything that we know is reducible to swirling matter and simulacra). How do we solve that?

The focus of our readings will be bks 3 (on death) and 4 (on sensation, representation, and love), but we will read selectively from all six books and try to cover, through discussion, issues as they arise in the whole of DRN: personal identity; the soul; the desirability of immortality; the nature of divinity; a critique of culture's norms. Background readings will be taken mainly from Long/Sedley; secondary literature will be covered as well (Clay, Fowler, Furley, Long, Mitsis, Nagel, Nussbaum, Schrijvers, Sedley, B. Williams, and others).

Students must read DRN in translation prior to the first class, begin working on bks 3-4 and other selections (see below), and be prepared to discuss the proem to bk 1 on the first day. Requirements: in-class presentations, one short paper on Lucretius (8 pp.), final research paper (20 pp.) on any related topic (Roman politics, Greek backgrounds, contemporary and more distant echoes, e.g., Cicero, Vergil, Horace, Longinus, etc.).

Those working on material culture in Rome (attitudes to death, gods, cults, ways of seeing and representing, identity politics, or simply to materiality itself) are especially welcome. A more finalized list of reading selections will be available as the Fall term approaches. Required books (to be made available at Shaman Drum): OCT or Loeb Lucretius (the text by M. F. Smith is superior to Bailey's OCT) Recommended (to be available at Shaman Drum): Kenney's ed. of Bk 3 (CUP 1971); Long/Sedley, The Hellenistic Philosophers, v. 1 (CUP 1987).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Latin 599. Supervised Reading in Latin Literature.

Advanced Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Regular reports and conferences required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Latin 641. Introduction to Latin Palaeography.

Graduate Courses

Section 001

Instructor(s): Charles Witke (frchas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Latin 819. Vergil.

Graduate Courses

Section 001

Instructor(s): Hershkowitz

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Latin 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Graduate Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Latin 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Graduate Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Latin 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Graduate Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

This page was created at 7:59 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.


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