College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Linguistics (Division 423)

This page was created at 7:59 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Linguistics

Wolverine Access Subject listing for LING

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Linguistics.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Linguistics this week go to What's New This Week.


Ling. 406/English 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 406.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Ling. 411. Introduction to Linguistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stefan Frisch (sfrisch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Not intended for Linguistics concentrators. Not open to students with credit for Ling. 211. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~sfrisch/L411_F00.html

This course is designed as an introduction to the field of linguistics for graduate students who have an interest in the nature of language. Upper-class undergraduates are also welcome. We will cover a wide range of topics related to language, with somewhat more focus on the core areas: phonetics, phonology, syntax, and semantics. In addition, students will learn the essential techniques for describing and analyzing linguistic data through working on examples taken from various languages of the world. There will be regular exercises, a midterm, and a final. There are no prerequisites. Students who have already had a general introduction to linguistics should enroll in an introduction to a specific field within linguistics: 313 (Sound Patterns), 512 (Phonetics), 513 (Phonology), 514 (Semantics and Pragmatics), 515 (Generative Syntax), 517 (Principles of Historical Linguistics), or 542 (Sociolinguistics).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 447/Psych. 445. Psychology of Language.

Section 001 Meets with Psychology 745.001

Instructor(s): James Hoeffner (jhoeff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 340. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/psych/445/001.nsf

See Psychology 445.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Ling. 450. Perspectives on Second Language Learning and Instruction.

Section 001 Meets with Linguistics 350.

Instructor(s): Joan Morley

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to explore past and current directions in both theoretical and practical aspects of second/foreign language learning and teaching. The course will examine a number of language learning/teaching paradigms and focus on the changing forms and functions of methodology, technique, and approach as the emphasis of language pedagogy has shifted from teacher directed, drill and pattern practice to learner focused, task based instruction. Students will have an opportunity to reflect upon and analyze their own language learning experiences and begin to critique and understand the instructional needs of varying language learning populations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 001 Text-To-Speech Synthesis. Meets with Linguistics 792.001

Instructor(s): San Duanmu (duanmu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~sfrisch/L492_F00.html

This course introduces the basic techniques in text-to-speech (TTS) synthesis. We will focus on the concatenative TTS method, although other approaches will also be discussed. The students will work on several projects in small groups. Prerequisite: knowledge of linguistics or a programming language.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 002 Diachronic Methodology and Syntactic Change. Meets with Linguistics 792.002.

Instructor(s): Mark Hale

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar focuses on two interconnected issues: (1) what is the nature of diachronic linguistics under generativist assumptions and (2) how is syntactic change to be understood within such a paradigm. Considerable time will be dedicated to exploring the strengths and weaknesses of traditional and existing generative approaches to historical linguistics, with attention paid to related matters, including sociolinguistic issues and topics concerning language acquisition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 003 Seminar on Pidgin/Creole Linguistics. Meets with Linguistics 792.003

Instructor(s): Donald Winford

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will introduce students to current thinking on the structure of pidgins and creoles, the processes of pidgin and creole formation, and the relationship between pidgin/creoles and other outcomes of language contact. The course will examine a Caribbean creole (perhaps Sranan Tongo) in some detail. The course will involve discussion and critical evaluation of selected readings, which students will have to prepare for each class. Students will have the chance to write a research paper on some aspect of pidgin/creole linguistics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 512(412). Phonetics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): José Benki (benki@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Ling. 313. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~benki/L512/syllabus512.html

This is an introduction to phonetics (the study of the nature of speech sounds). The course will focus on: (1) the description of speech sounds in terms of their articulatory, acoustic, and perceptual characteristics; and (2) the production and translation of sounds that occur in languages of the world. Class meetings will comprise lectures on articulation, acoustics or perception, and drills in producing and transcribing particular classes of speech sounds. Weekly labs will include computer analysis of speech. Course grades will be based on transcriptions, lab assignments, midterm and final exams (and a language project for graduate students). No prerequisites, but an introductory linguistics course is strongly recommended.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 515(415). Generative Syntax.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Samuel Epstein

Prerequisites & Distribution: Ling. 315. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In the Generative framework, syntactic structure is generated by a formal rule system and by applying constraints to its output. Some of these rules and constraints are hypothesized to be innate "unlearned" (perhaps a species specific system that, in part, makes human language acquisition possible). Other aspects of our linguistic knowledge appears "learned". This class introduces this so-called "Principles and Parameters" approach to the analysis of syntactic phenomena, focusing on how the various postulated ("simple") rules and constraints interact to generate ("complex") structures, characteristic of natural language sentences (such as the one you are now reading, and understanding). Course requirements may include weekly assignments, a midterm, and a final. For undergraduates Linguistics 315 and permission of the instructor are prerequisites. There is no prerequisite for graduate students. Text: Introduction to Government & Binding Theory, by L. Haegeman, Blackwell 2nd Edition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I for undergraduates

Ling. 518(418). Linguistic Typology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter Hook (pehook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing; undergraduates with permission of department. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~pehook/lingw97.html

While humans appear fairly alike in physical characteristics and mental capacity, their languages (and cultures) are extremely diverse. Is such diversity infinitely random and inherently unpredictable? Or can languages be divided into a small number of discrete types? Are there characteristics that all languages share? How are formal properties of human language related to or independent of its functions? These are some of the questions addressed by language typologists through a comparative methodology that depends on developing uniform definitions of grammatical categories and applying them across a number of languages. Linguistics 518 invites students to master this methodology by (1) having them investigate unfamiliar languages through study of published descriptive grammars and (2) relating this direct experience to the principle findings of contemporary typological research. Coursework consists of:

  1. readings and lectures on the major categories and parameters which are used to describe and classify languages,
  2. a number of short reports on given phenomena as they are manifested in the languages that individual students adopt,
  3. discussion and comparison of these findings in class,
  4. a midterm exam, and
  5. a final term paper treating a particular typological parameter in one or more languages.

Students will make oral presentations based on pre-final versions of their term papers. Prerequisite: an introductory course in linguistics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 519(419). Discourse Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Deborah Keller-Cohen (dkc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Text has become a recurrent metaphor for the way we make sense of our world. This course explores how textuality has been interpreted in various disciplines and how the analysis of texts can be useful in answering different types of questions. Students can expect to gain a basic knowledge of various ways of analyzing both spoken and written texts. The course examines a variety of topics including why the concept of text is a useful and necessary way to think about human communication; how experience is encoded differently in speaking versus writing; different methods of analyzing texts; and how the analysis of texts enables us to understand such social problems as communication in families, doctor-patient interaction, and courtroom testimony. This course is seminar in format. A high level of student participation is expected. The course requirements include regular writing in response to course readings, homework assignments, and a final paper. Some background knowledge of linguistic concepts is important.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 532. Issues in Bilingualism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Teresa Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Bilingualism has been common throughout history, but in the last half century or so a number of developments such as decolonization, an increase in demand for popular education, massive population shifts through migration, and the development of global communication have served to accentuate our sense of living in a visibly and audibly multilingual modern world. A number of interesting issues can be dealt with in a course on bilingualism, all of great current relevance. Examples are acquisition of language(s) by children in bilingual families; the bilingual brain; aspects of bilingual knowledge/competence; language maintenance and language shift in migrant communities; bilingual education; multilingualism and multiculturalism in the United States; minority languages; the politics of bilingualism; attitudes to bilingualism. Students will be encouraged to work where relevant with their own languages and endeavor systematically to frame their own experience of bilingualism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 541/CS 595/EECS 595. Natural Language Processing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richmond Thomason (rthomaso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: CAEN lab access fee required for non-Engineering students.

Course Homepage: http://www.eecs.umich.edu/~rthomaso/cl/cl-course.html

An introduction to computational linguistics, stressing the processing of written language but with supplementary discussion of topics relating to spoken language. The course will be based on the following textbook: Daniel Jurafsky and James H. Martin, Speech and Natural Language Processing, Prentice Hall, 1999.

Topics covered in this course will include: finite state automata and finite state techniques for processing words, language models, tagging corpora for part-of-speech, context-free grammars, parsing techniques, unification grammars and unification-based parsing, probabilistic parsing, semantics, discourse modeling, word sense disambiguation and information retrieval, natural language generation, and (if time permits) machine translation.

There will be a midterm and a final examination, as well as a course project and regularly assigned exercises. Non-CS students without strong programming experience will not have to do a project that requires programming.

This course is the normal introduction to computational linguistics for advanced undergraduates or graduate students in Computer Science, the School of Information, or Linguistics, and normally is a prerequisite for more advanced courses in the area at the University of Michigan. For linguistics students, Linguistics 513 and any other 400- or more advanced level linguistics course are prerequisites. Computer literacy is essential; some programming experience would be helpful. Students in Computer Science or the School of Information should take the versions of this course offered in those units.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 001 Text-To-Speech Synthesis. Meets with Linguistics 492.001. Prerequisite: knowledge of linguistics or a programming language.

Instructor(s): San Duanmu (duanmu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~sfrisch/L492_F00.html

This course introduces the basic techniques in text-to-speech (TTS) synthesis. We will focus on the concatenative TTS method, although other approaches will also be discussed. The students will work on several projects in small groups.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 002 Diachronic Methodology and Syntactic Change. Meets with Linguistics 792.002.

Instructor(s): Mark Hale

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar focuses on two interconnected issues: (1) what is the nature of diachronic linguistics under generativist assumptions and (2) how is syntactic change to be understood within such a paradigm. Considerable time will be dedicated to exploring the strengths and weaknesses of traditional and existing generative approaches to historical linguistics, with attention paid to related matters, including sociolinguistic issues and topics concerning language acquisition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 003 Seminar on Pidgin/Creole Linguistics. Meets with Linguistics 492.003

Instructor(s): Donald Winford

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will introduce students to current thinking on the structure of pidgins and creoles, the processes of pidgin and creole formation, and the relationship between pidgin/creoles and other outcomes of language contact. The course will examine a Caribbean creole (perhaps Sranan Tongo) in some detail. The course will involve discussion and critical evaluation of selected readings, which students will have to prepare for each class. Students will have the chance to write a research paper on some aspect of pidgin/creole linguistics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 792. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 004 Meets with Information 760.001 and EECS 597

Instructor(s): Dragomir Radev (radev@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.si.umich.edu/~radev/760f00/

A survey of techniques used in language studies and information processing. Students will learn how to explore and analyze textual data in the context of Web-based information retrieval systems. At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to work as information designers and analysts.

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADES

  • Problem sets (3 x 10%) The assignments will involve analysis of Web-based data using both manual and automated techniques.
  • Project (20%) Data analysis and/or programming project
  • Midterm (20%) A mixture of short-answer and essay-type questions
  • Final (30%) A mixture of short-answer and essay-type questions

READING LIST

  • Main reading:

    • Oakes. Statistics for Corpus Linguistics. Edinburgh University Press 1998.
  • Selected chapters from the following books will be used as additional readings:

    • Manning and Schuetze. Foundations of Statistical Natural Language Processing. MIT Press. 1999.
    • Jurafsky and Martin. Speech and Language Processing. Prentice-Hall 2000.
    • Cover & Thomas. Elements of Information Theory. John Wiley and Sons 1991.
    • Baeza-Yates and Ribeiro-Neto. Modern Information Retrieval. Addison-Wesley 1999.
  • Articles: If necessary, a small number of articles will be assigned to complement the major readings. These articles will be primarily from ACL, AAAI, SIGIR proceedings and/or the following journals: Computational Linguistics, Information Retrieval, Artificial Intelligence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 801. Seminar on Graduate Study.

Section 001 History of the Modern Field of Linguistics. (1 credit).

Instructor(s): Sally Thomason

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (1-2).

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Ling. 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Ling. 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): S Thomason

Prerequisites & Distribution: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Ling. 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Ling. 997. Special Research I and II.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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This page was created at 7:59 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.


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