College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Philosophy (Division 442)

This page was created at 8:02 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Philosophy

Wolverine Access Subject listing for PHIL

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Philosophy.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Philosophy this week go to What's New This Week.


Philo. 414. Mathematical Logic.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richmond Thomason (rthomaso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an advanced introduction to symbolic logic, intended to provide a foundation for understanding current research in philosophical logic and related areas of cognitive science. The course will concentrate on the theory of logic, and will cover the following topics:

  1. The art of formalization,
  2. Proof techniques and proof theory,
  3. Models and validity,
  4. Semantic completeness of propositional and quantificational logic,
  5. Incompleteness and undecidability,
  6. The formalization of specific reasoning tasks, such as planning.

    Written work will consist of problem sets and midterm and final exams. Students who are uncertain about their mathematical background may wish to consult with the instructor before taking this course. More information on the course will be available from the instructor's home page at http://www.eecs.umich.edu/~rthomaso/.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    Philo. 419. Philosophy of the Arts.

    Section 001 Meets with Philosophy 319.001

    Instructor(s): Kendall Walton (klwalton@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Not open to philosophy graduate students. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 319. (3).Will not satisfy 400-level course requirement for concentration in philosophy.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Philosophy 319.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

    Philo. 423. Problems of Space and Time.

    Section 001 Meets with Humanities Institute 411.001.

    Instructor(s): Lawrence Sklar (lsklar@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One logic introduction and either one other philosophy course or 12 credits of science. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Traditional philosophical questions about the nature of time and space have been strikingly influenced in the twentieth century by the results of contemporary physical science. At the same time, the important current physical theories of space and time rest explicitly or implicitly on deep-rooted philosophical assumptions. The purpose of this course is to study the mutual interaction between science and philosophy as illustrated in problems about space and time. Typical topics to be considered include the status of knowledge about the structure of space and time, substantial versus relational theories of space-time, spatio-temporal order and causal order, and the so-called problem of the direction of time. This course can be appreciated by students who have either a background in philosophy especially logic and philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology or background in physical science or mathematics. An attempt is made in this course to introduce the fundamental ideas of both philosophy and science at a level which can be understood by those without extensive background so students need not be proficient in both science and philosophy to benefit from the course. The primary text is L. Sklar Space, Time, and Spacetime. There are additional readings from such authors as Reichenbach, Poincaré, Grunbaum, Smart, Wheeler, and others.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    Philo. 429. Ethical Analysis.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Peter Railton (prailton@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phil. 361, 363, or 366. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Questions about the nature and standing of morality arise in both theory and practice. Moreover, in recent years morality has served as a central example in wide philosophical debates about the nature of normativity and the relation of theory to practice. In this course we will critically investigate several of the most influential philosophical conceptions of morality, including historical as well as contemporary writings. Among the questions we will consider:

    • In what sense, if any, is there a need for theory in morality?
    • How are we to understand the meaning of moral terms?
    • Are moral judgments capable of truth and falsity?
    • In what sense, if any, can moral claims be objective?
    • How is morality related to relationality?
    • What is the relation of "ought" to "is"?
    • And, why be moral?

    Midterm and final examinations; a term paper.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

    Philo. 450. Philosophy of Cognition.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Eric Lormand (lormand@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in Philosophy. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is about the science of consciousness and the psychoanalysis of the unconscious, and their relations to contemporary analytic and continental philosophy. What is the difference between conscious and unconscious mental states? Can science handle philosophically troublesome features of consciousness, such as introspectibility (how one "reads" one's own mind), phenomenality (how one's mind "feels" to one), and subjectivity (one's seeming inability to "read" or "feel" other minds)? Can the various theories and therapies developed by Freud and later psychoanalysts stand up to scientific testing? How do they bear on philosophical issues about motivation, (ir)rationality, selfhood, and the status of commonsense psychology?

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    Philo. 461. Continental Rationalism.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Edwin Curley (emcurley@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~emcurley/461syl00.htm

    "Continental Rationalism" is usually taken to refer to a philosophical movement in the 17th Century, whose most important representatives were Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz, and who are supposed to have shared an epistemological program which was overly optimistic about what could be known by pure reason, independently of experience.

    This course will not focus as firmly on metaphysics and epistemology as is common in courses which bear this label. Instead it will be a broadranging course, which will pay attention to moral and political philosophy as well. We will look in detail at Descartes and Spinoza. But we will also give equal time to Hobbes (who is not usually classed as a rationalist). And we will examine critically the idea that the 'rationalists' did share an epistemological program of the kind they are usually thought to share. As background to the 'rationalists,' we will look briefly at three figures not generally classed as rationalists: Machiavelli, Montaigne and Galileo.

    This course is intended as the first installment of a sequence of two courses, the second of which will be offered Winter Term is Phil 462, British Empiricism, a subject normally conceived to involve an exclusive focus on Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. In fact 462 will include discussion of Leibniz and Rousseau as well as the traditional empiricists (and among the empricists, will attend more to Locke and Hume than to Berkeley). Between them the two courses are intended to provide a good survey of European intellectual history from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. But the courses are independent of one another. 461 is not a prerequisite for 462, nor must students who enroll in 461 go on to 462.

    The formal prerequisite for this course is one introductory course in philosophy. It would be desirable to have more background than that, since we will be covering a lot of ground, some of it quite difficult. If you have doubts about your preparation for the course, check with me by email: emcurley@umich.edu.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    Philo. 477. Theory of Knowledge.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): James Joyce (jjoyce@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Phil. 345 or 383. (3).

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jjoyce/phil477.html

    This course is a broad survey of the modern theory of knowledge that is designed for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. It will begin by introducing and evaluating the traditional view that knowledge is justified, true opinion. The notion of justification will then be analyzed in detail. Particular attention will be paid to the "infinite regress of reasons" paradox and the attendant debate between foundationalists and coherentists about the nature of justifying reasons. The important distinction between internalist and externalist theories of justification will also be discussed. Further topics to be covered include: arguments for global skepticism, W. Quine's contention that epistemology should be "naturalized," recent contributions of Bayesian statisticians and philosophers to debates about justification and knowledge, and an introduction to recent work of social psychologists, anthropologists and biologists in the field of "evolutionary epistemology."

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    Philo. 596. Reading Course.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (2-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    Philo. 597. Proseminar.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Thomas Hofweber (hofweber@umich.edu) , James Joyce (jjoyce@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (6).

    Credits: (6).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jjoyce/phil597.htm

    The proseminar provides first-year graduate students with an opportunity to engage as a group with a range of issues.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    Philo. 598. Independent Literature Survey.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    Philo. 599. Candidacy Reading Course.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3). (INDENPENDENT).

    Credits: (2-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    Philo. 600. Advanced Studies.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    Philo. 605. Seminar in Logic.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Jamie Tappenden (tappen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    An exciting recent development in logical research has been the systematic study of reasoning with diagrams. This initiative required the overthrow of a long-standing prejudice against using pictures as genuine components of arguments (as opposed to mere illustrative aids or suggestive prompts). The system of "heterogeneous reasoning" that have been developed so far are interesting and useful in their own right. This presses on a remarkably wide variety of philosophical issues, concerning the arguably unique characteristics of visual representation. This course will examine some simple systems of reasoning with diagrams, and survey the philosophical issues that arise. To come at the philosophical themes from different perspectives I will take up a range of topics, not only in logic but in bordering areas. These will include cognitive science (the "imagery debate"), history of philosophy (especially Kant and is interpreters on "intuition") the history of nineteenth century mathematics ("analytic" versus "synthetic" geometry; Felix Klein and successors on "intuitive mathematics", etc.), plus aesthetics and art history (Panofsky and Goodman on the conventionality of linear perspective). The course will include a bare-bones introduction to the theory of computational complexity, to support some of the comparative claims that can be made about proof efficiency etc.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    Philo. 615. Seminar in Philosophy of Language.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Ian Proops

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The seminar focuses on the "modal" concepts of necessity and possibility. In the first part of the course we study contemporary work on the nature of modality; in the second we examine a number of applications of modal theory to problems in the philosophy of language. Possible topics include: the analysis of modality, modal realism, cross-world identity, rigid designation, modal knowledge, modal content, counterfactuals, and epistemic possibility. No prior knowledge of modal logic is assumed, but students will receive instruction in elementary modal logic as the course progresses. Readings from W. V. Quine, David Lewis, Saul Kripke, Robert Stalnaker, Christopher Peacocke, David Kaplan, Graeme Forbes, Steve Yablo, and others. There is one assigned text: "On the Plurality of Worlds," by David Lewis. It will be available by or before the end of the summer, at Shaman Drum.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    Philo. 640. Seminar in Ethics.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Allan Gibbard (gibbard@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    Philo. 697. Candidacy Seminar.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): David Vellemen (velleman@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Restricted to Philosophy Candidates and Philosophy Doctoral students nearing Candidacy. Graduate standing. (2).

    Credits: (2).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    Philo. 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

    Philo. 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1).

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    Philo. 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

    This page was created at 8:02 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.


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