College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Russian (Division 466)

This page was created at 8:04 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Russian

Wolverine Access Subject listing for RUSSIAN

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Russian.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Russian this week go to What's New This Week.


Russian 401. Fourth-Year Russian.

Language

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Snejana Tempest (tempest@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Russian 302. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 403. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Russian 401 is offered during the Fall Term and Russian 402 is offered during the Winter Term of every academic year. Prerequisites: three years of Russian (minimum). Classwork, homework, and labwork include: grammar and word formation; reading and listening (films and TV news included); discussions; oral reports and compositions. Bi-weekly grammar tests and final oral presentation. Textbook: Let's Talk About Life! by Emily Tall and Valentina Vlasikova; cost is $42.00 and covers two terms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Russian 413. Business Russian.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vitaly Shevoroshkin (vvs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Russian 302. (3).

Credits: (3; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is planned for advanced Russian students (3rd year and above) who are oriented toward economics or business. In particular this would target seniors seeking experience in international business and graduate students in the Center for Russian and East European Studies Master's Degree program (or in various departments, who either wish to pursue employment opportunities in business or government or who wish to get a Ph.D. in economics, political science, or history). The course will focus upon the vocabulary and locations of commercial Russian, both oral and written. Students will be expected to learn format and jargon for various types of business communication. No final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Russian 449. Twentieth-Century Russian Literature.

Literature

Section 001 Russian Literature, 1890-1921.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This historical survey of Russian literature from 1890 to 1921 covers the final achievements of realism and the response to modernism in the later works of Tolstoy and Chekhov, the art of symbolism, the post-symbolic currents in poetry and prose, and the major literary events of the first post-revolutionary decade both in the USSR and in exile. The required reading includes English translations of representative poems by Solov'ev, Briusov, Bal'mont, Merezhkovsky, Hippius, Sologub, Blok, Belyi, Viacheslav Ivanov, Annensky, Kuzmin, Khodasevich, Gumilev, Akhmatova, Mandel'stam, Khlebnikov, Maiakovsky, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva, Esenin, and Kliuev. Students select their own readings in prose and drama out of an extensive list of titles ranging from Solov'ev's Three Conversations through Belyi's Petersburg to Zamiatin's We. Midterm and a final take-home examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Russian 451/RC Hums. 451. Survey of Russian Literature.

Literature

Section 001 Russian Fiction, 1820-1870.

Instructor(s): Andreas Schönle (aschonle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on the masterpieces of Russian fiction written between 1820 and 1870, including such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. Evolving fast from Romanticism to High Realism, this period marks a blossoming of Russian culture, despite strained relations with political authorities. We will trace how writers treated the political, social, intellectual and religious issues dividing their contemporaries, creating a unique kind of literature that claimed authority over society in settling these problems. Topics include romantic self-fashioning and posturing (including such risky aristocratic games as dueling and gambling), gender relations, the fate of the educated in society, violence and repentance, reform and stagnation, history and the private self, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. Participation in class discussion, two short papers, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Russian 461. Pushkin.

Russian Literature in Russian

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Russian 352. A knowledge of Russian is required. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the poetry, prose, and drama of Alexander Pushkin.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Russian 463. Chekhov.

Literature

Section 001 Meets with Russian 855.001.

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A detailed examination of the literary career of Anton Chekhov: his prose and drama are analyzed and assessed in the context of the literary, social, and political currents of his time, and as masterpieces of Russian literature. An informal lecture course, with contributions and discussion from students encouraged. This course should appeal to anyone interested in short story or in modern drama. It is taught in English, and all readings may be done in English. Two papers, three one-hour, in-class examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Russian 476(Slavic 567). Russian Literary and Cultural Theory and the West.

Literature

Section 001 20th-Century Russian Critical Theory. Meets with Russian 861.001 and Comparative Literature 790.001.

Instructor(s): Andreas Schönle (aschonle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines twentieth-century Russian critical theory in its relationship with Western literary and cultural theory. Translated works by the Russian Formalists, Soviet semioticians (Lotman and Uspensky), Bakhtin and his circle, as well as contemporary post-modernists will be discussed in the light of comparable Western approaches. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between literature and the cultural environment. We will discuss issues such as literature as device, literature in its institutions, poetic form and play, aesthetic value and ritual, the theory of narrative and the search for a masterplot, the semiotics of literature, culture as text, dialogue and the novel, Marxist criticism, postmodernism and Stalinist ideology, and the mythology of everyday life in Russia and America. Among Western critics we will read works by Genette, Williams, Barthes, Hernstein Smith, Iser, Greenblatt, Jauss, de Man, Jameson, and Baudrillard. Very short weekly essays, one oral presentation, and one 15-page paper. Knowledge of Russian not required. All texts read in translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Russian 651. Supervised Reading of Russian Literature.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the chair of department. Graduate standing. (1-4). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Russian 855. Seminar on Chekhov.

Section 001 Meets with Russian 463.

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A detailed examination of the literary career of Anton Chekhov: his prose and drama are analyzed and assessed in the context of the literary, social, and political currents of his time, and as masterpieces of Russian literature. An informal lecture course, with contributions and discussion from students encouraged. This course should appeal to anyone interested in short story or in modern drama. It is taught in English, and all readings may be done in English. Two papers, three one-hour, in-class examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Russian 861. Seminar on Twentieth-Century Russian Literature.

Section 001 20th-Century Russian Critical Theory. Meets with Russian 476.001 and Comparative Literature 790.001.

Instructor(s): Andreas Schönle (aschonle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines twentieth-century Russian critical theory in its relationship with Western literary and cultural theory. Translated works by the Russian Formalists, Soviet semioticians (Lotman and Uspensky), Bakhtin and his circle, as well as contemporary post-modernists will be discussed in the light of comparable Western approaches. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between literature and the cultural environment. We will discuss issues such as literature as device, literature in its institutions, poetic form and play, aesthetic value and ritual, the theory of narrative and the search for a masterplot, the semiotics of literature, culture as text, dialogue and the novel, Marxist criticism, postmodernism and Stalinist ideology, and the mythology of everyday life in Russia and America. Among Western critics we will read works by Genette, Williams, Barthes, Herrnstein Smith, Iser, Greenblatt, Jauss, de Man, Jameson, and Baudrillard. One oral presentation and one 15-page paper. Knowledge of Russian not required. All texts read in translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Russian 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Russian 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

This page was created at 8:04 AM on Fri, Oct 20, 2000.


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