College of LS&A

Fall '00 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

This page was created at 6:37 PM on Thu, Oct 12, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Spanish

Wolverine Access Subject listing for SPANISH

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Spanish.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Spanish this week go to What's New This Week.


Spanish 411. Advanced Syntax.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. Spanish 405 is strongly recommended. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the analysis of the major morphological and syntactic structures of Spanish. The course begins with a consideration of morphology, with topics such as the function of inflexional suffixes, the role of derivational suffixes, word order rules, verb morphology, etc. and then moves to the description and analysis of the simple and complex sentence, their syntax and their use. The course will be complemented by practical exercises, and the identification, segmentation and analysis of the various types of sentences studied. There will be a midterm, a final exam, and a required research project.

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Spanish 413/Rom. Ling. 413/EducationD 455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will assist teachers of Spanish as a foreign language, and students interested in language learning in the process of clarifying their own beliefs about language learning and teaching, both in terms of theoretical issues and practical implications for classroom instruction. The course will review second/foreign language acquisition theories and examine their pedagogical application of the classroom. Students will become familiar with different methodologies and teaching techniques. Emphasis will be given to curriculum design and material development for teaching and testing all four skills within a student-centered philosophy of teaching. A portion of each class session will be devoted to microteaching sessions as a means of providing students with hands-on teaching experience and concrete input on their teaching techniques, allowing students to gain a better understanding of what is needed to become an effective teacher of Spanish.

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Spanish 414/Rom. Ling. 414. Background of Modern Spanish.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven Dworkin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This lecture course surveys the historical, social, cultural, and literary background against which the spoken Latin of the Iberian Peninsula evolved into Spanish. The emphasis is on the external rather than the internal history of Spanish. Topics covered include the influence on the development of Spanish of such diverse languages as Basque, Gothic, Arabic, French, Italian, and Literary Latin, the role of the Reconquest (Reconquista) in shaping the linguistic map of Spain, and the circumstances leading to the rise of the Castilian dialect as the national standard. The course will be taught in Spanish. The textbook will be made available in a course pack. In addition, graduate students will be required to read the chapters dealing with Spain in Roger Wright, Late Latin and Early Romance. There will be a midterm and final exams, and a written report. Prerequisite: Good reading knowledge of Spanish.

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Spanish 435. Independent Study.

Literature

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Interested students should contact the concentration advisor.

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Spanish 440. Literatures and Cultures of the Borderlands: The Politics of Language.

Literature

Section 001 Representations, Histories, and Future, Repercussions of Latino/a Literatures

Instructor(s): Lucia Suarez (suarez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the growing importance of Latino/a literatures and the dichotomies and intersections between Latin America, the United States, and the myriad borders implied. Questions of constructions of ethnicity, interpolations of race, and conflictual stereotyping will be carefully analyzed. Authors whose works will be studied include Cristina García, Julia Alvarez, Junot Díaz, Ana Castillo, Cherrie Morraga, José David Saldivar, Stuart Hall, and Judith Butler. Students will be expected to keep journals.

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Spanish 448. Hispanic Culture Through Community Service Learning.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Adriana Kampfner

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 300-level Spanish course. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is for students interested in using the Spanish language within a social context and in interacting with local Latino/a communities. It integrates work within a Spanish-speaking community with academic readings and learning about U.S. Latino or Hispanic culture. Students go once a week to the community site and also attend a weekly class seminar where they reflect on the theoretical, cultural, linguistic and practical issues regarding their service experience.

Students can complete this course by working as peer mentors for community-service learning courses in Spanish or by enrolling in a community-service learning course within a Hispanic/Latino community setting.

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Spanish 459. Don Quijote.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique Garcia (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

El presente seminario estudiará este texto canónico desde una perspectiva contemporánea, enfatizando en su contextualización socio-política, histórica y literaria, además de nuevos acercamientos que se adaptan a la sensibilidad moderna. Se prestará atención a aspectos tales como la naturaleza del texto (posibles receptores, género y clase), su consideración narratológica como lectura frente al género popular y auditivo del teatro, su carácter innovador frente a la novela clásica y su lugar dentro de la escena cultural barroca. Simultáneamente, se analizarán aspectos estrictamente literarios como la coherencia textual, personajes y marginalidad, espacios urbanos y rurales, sexualidad latente o abierta, violencia y cuerpo, paradigmas de subversión ideológica, subtradiciones literarias en juego o espacios míticos y simbólicos. La clase y lecturas asignadas serán en español.

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Spanish 465. The Modern Spanish Novel I.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juli Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Galdós' novel, Fortunata y Jacinta, like other realist novels of the nineteenth century, displays a vast and complex social world. The voyeuristic narrator surveys the neighborhoods of Madrid and peers into the homes of diverse character types: the newly rich bourgeois, the slum-dweller, the fallen woman, the charity worker, the parasite, the usurer, the consumptive, the free-thinker. But however empirical its aims this novelistic observatory is of course a fictional construction that produces a real-life effect. Moreover, in its time, Fortunata y Jacinta participated in an entertainment industry through which serial novels precursors to television soap operas were avidly consumed by middle-class readers. In this course we will examine the contradictions of Galdós' realist enterprise as revealed in his novel, essays, and speeches. Additional readings include historical documents, critical, and theoretical essays. Assignments include two essays (7-8 pages each), two exams, and a class presentation (in groups).

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Spanish 467. Literary and Artistic Movements in Modern Spain.

Literature

Section 001 Literary and Artistic Movements in Modern Spain: Writing Under the Regime

Instructor(s): Juli Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).For Grad credit, must also do 20 pg. research paper. May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine literature and film produced in totalitarian and post-totalitarian Spain (1938 1985). As a point of departure, we will survey recent Spanish history: the Republic, the Civil War, the Franco regime, and the transition to democracy. We will address the effects of censorship, in particular, the strategies and tactics developed by writers to evade prohibition. We will also examine how the Franco regime is represented in literature and films, and how characters struggle to maneuver within repressive fictional societies. Taking a broad definition of regimes, as "systems of rule," we will consider the interrelationships among types of regimes political, economic, religious, familial, literary, and linguistic. To what extent do literary texts function as "regimes of sense," structured by patterns of meaning and sustained by cultural belief systems? To what extent do writing and reading function as "sense-making enterprises," governed by rules, conventions, and beliefs? What degree of expressive and interpretive freedom is possible within this rule-bound activity? Readings: novels, poetry, plays, historical writings (25-35 pp. of careful reading per class). Assignments: two essays (8 10 pp. each), occasional one-page reaction papers, oral class presentation (in pairs or groups), two exams. Note that Spanish 467 is a topics course which can be repeated for up to nine credits. Graduate students taking the course will complete additional readings and reaction papers, to be decided based on their interests and my recommendations.

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Spanish 470. Latin-American Literature, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries.

Literature

Section 001 First Images of America: the Early Chroniclers

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/spanish/470/001.nsf

The objective of this course is to study some of the stages of the long process best defined as the intellectual (and/or ideological) creation of America by the European subject. The course will focus on the culture specific ways in which European subjects confronted the new as well as on the ways they produced knowledge about the unknown. In order to do so, we will read the first text written by a European explorer, the Diary of Columbus (a paradigmatic narrative that served as a model for other texts), where the author gives an account of the new lands and their inhabitants. Next, we will read E. O'Gorman, who advances a theory about America as an entity or concept created by the European imagination (with the help of Columbus' Diary as a point of departure). After O'Gorman, we will study the Letters of Vespucci, the man after whom America was named and from whom a good number of myths about the New World started to gain currency. Another text to be analyzed is Pigafetta's account of Magellan's voyage of circumnavegation. Pedro Mártir will give us the chance to study an early encyclopedic summa of knowledge about the new lands. The last author to be studied, Ulric Schmidel, produced a little known narrative that shows the other side of the Conquest: a failed enterprise (the first foundation of Buenos Aires).

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Spanish 475. Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century.

Literature

Section 001 Testimonial Narratives of Latin America.

Instructor(s): Alejandro Hererro-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).May be elected for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The historical representation of Latin America from Colonial texts emphasized the remarkable qualities of this newly discovered world. These early accounts were often conditioned by the need to justify the activities undertaken by the conquerors, and resulted in the blending of supposedly objective historical discourse with literary and personal accounts. This intertwining of the literary and the personal in historical accounts persists as a significant mode of contemporary expression in Latin America. This course will examine the writing of personal accounts and witnessing (testimonios) in the construction of historical discourse. We will pay particular attention to the significance of this documentary trend in relation to the socioeconomic and ideological conflicts endemic in today's Latin America.

TENTATIVE READING LIST:

García Márquez. La aventura de Miguel Littín clandestino en Chile
. Relato de un náufrago.
Elena Poniatowska. Hasta no verte Jesus mío.
Elizabeth Burgos. Me llamo Rigoberta Menchú.
Miguel Barnet. Biografía de un cimarrón.
Barrios de Chungara, Domitila. Si me permiten hablar.

GRADING: Active participation (20%), Midterm paper (30%), Final paper (30%), Oral Reports (20%).

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Spanish 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literature

Section 001 XIXth Century Foundational Fictions: The Andean Case

Instructor(s): Javier Sanjines (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will study three novels of the period. We will do a comparative study of the Chilean Alberto Blest Gana's "Martin Rivas," the Peruvian Clorinda Matto de Turner's "Aves sin nido," and the Bolivian Nataniel Aguirre's "Juan de la Rosa." Through the study of these three novels, we will see the similarities and also the differences in the socio-historical development of the three Andean nations.

Students are expected to participate very actively in class discussions. There will be a midterm exam and a final take-home.

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Spanish 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literature

Section 002 Topic?

Instructor(s): María Soledad Barbón (mbarbon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

En el centro de este curso está la obra literaria en español del escritor y etnólogo peruano José María Arguedas. En orden cronológico se analizarán sus cuentos Agua (1935), su novela Yawar Fiesta (1941) y su más conocida obra Los ríos profundos (1958), todas narraciones cuyo núcleo fundamental es la sociedad tradicional andina.

A través de una lectura cronológica se enfocarán los mundos cada vez más complejos que se trazan en estos textos, y las implicaciones ideológicas que esa evolución conlleva. Se prestará especial atención al problema del lenguaje, clave fundamental para la comprensión de la obra arguediana, y a su "filiación" con el movimiento indigenista.

Estas lecturas se complementarán con ensayos crítico-literarios del autor y en lo posible, con algunos de sus -generalmente menos conocidos- trabajos etnográficos que él realizó en las regiones descritas en sus novelas.

El curso se dictará en español.

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Spanish 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literature

Section 003 Case Studies in Andean Sociolinguistics. Meets with Latin American and Caribbean Studies 455.001.

Instructor(s): Serafin Coronel-Molina (scoronel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3).May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course offers graduate and advanced undergraduate students with strong competency in Spanish the opportunity to focus their studies on a specific sociolinguistic situation: that of the Andean region, which extends from southern Colombia through Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Argentina. While the main emphasis of the course will be on the effects of languages in contact, it is also beneficial to study social and cultural aspects to gain a fuller understanding of the sociolinguistic situation in this region. Given this broad-based approach, the course will be useful for students from a wide range of disciplines, such as linguistics, literature, anthropology, sociology, history and education, among others.

Students will gain an overview of the theoretical foundations of many of the areas within sociolinguistics in general that are specifically relevant to a study of Andean sociolinguistics. The tentative outline of topics includes: languages, dialects and varieties; language contact; bilingualism and bilingual education; code switching and code mixing; language ideologies and attitudes; language maintenance and shift; revitalization and reversing language shift; language and culture; language and gender; language policy and planning; and aspects of multilingualism in cyberspace. The course will take a case-study approach. Students will apply some aspect(s) of the sociolinguistic theory studied in class to a specific case on an Andean country of their choice, and write a research paper on it in Spanish. The class itself will also be conducted in Spanish, although readings will be in both English and Spanish.

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Spanish 528/French 528/Rom. Ling. 528. Teaching Romance Languages.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helene Neu

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Romance Linguistics 528.001.

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Spanish 635. Independent Study.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing and permission of advisor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Spanish 855. Special Topics Seminar.

Section 001 The Politics of Publishing: Censorship, Marketing, and Latin American Fiction

Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on the role of government censors and their relations with publishing houses like Seix Barral in the commercial distribution of contemporary Latin American fiction. Our readings and discussions will examine how the institutions of literature editors, literary agents, literary prizes, scholars, readers, publishing houses, authors, etc. interacted in the creation of contemporary Latin American fiction in Spain between 1960 and 1975. The course will also address the larger questions of how cultural change is brought about, and how such change can be interpreted by looking at the various fields that take part in the process of cultural production. We will examine how personal, cultural and political circumstances combined to shape the literary production of specific Latin American "Boom" writers, and how Hispanic cultural currents crisscrossed the Atlantic in the 1960s and 1970s.

Tentative Reading List:

  • Abellán, Manuel. Censura y creación literaria en España (1939-1976).
  • Anderson, Danny J. "Creating Cultural Prestige: Editorial Joaquín Mortiz."
  • Barral, Carlos. Los años sin excusa & Cuando las horas veloces (Memoirs)
  • Bourdieu, Pierre. The Field of Cultural Production
  • Cabrera Infante, Guillermo. Tres tristes tigres (Premio Biblioteca Breve 1964)
  • Cisquella, Georgina et al. Diez años de represión cultural: la censura de libros durante la Ley de Prensa (1966-76).
  • Donoso, José. The Spanish American Boom: A Personal History.
  • - El jardín de al lado
  • Franco, Jean. "Narrador, Autor, Superestrella"
  • Fuentes, Carlos. La nueva novela hispanoamericana.
  • - Cambio de piel. (Premio Biblioteca Breve 1967)
  • González León, Adriano. País portátil (Premio Biblioteca Breve 1968)
  • Guillory, John. Cultural Capital.
  • Leñero, Vicente. Los albañiles. (Premio Bibliteca Breve 1964)
  • Rodríguez Monegal, Emir. El boom de la novela latinoamericana.
  • Shaw, Donald L. "The Post-Boom in Spanish American Fiction."
  • Smith, Barbara Herrnstein. Contingencies of Value.
  • Tola de Habich, Fernando and Patricia Grieve. Los españoles y el boom.
  • Vargas Llosa, Mario. La ciudad y los perros. (Premio Biblioteca Breve 1962)
  • - La tía Julia y el escribidor
  • Viñas, David, et al. Más allá del boom: literatura y mercado.

Grading: Class discussions (20%), Oral presentations (20%), Abstract and conference-style presentation (20%), Paper (40%)

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Spanish 870. Seminar in Hispanic Literature of the 19th and 20th Centuries.

Section 001 The Border in Mexican and Chicano/a Literature La frontera en la literatura mexicana y chicana

Instructor(s): Javier Durán

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Recent publications in literary and cultural studies have developed more sophisticated ways to theorize borders as important sites of cultural production. "Border theory", "border writing," "border visions," all these terms stress that the concept of the border generates cultural images encompassing a hybrid, heterogeneous experience. Thus, the purpose of this course is to analyze the representation of the U.S.-Mexico border in 20th-century Mexican and American literature from a binational yet local perspective. A multi disciplinary theoretical framework will allow us to study the selected readings. The course will be taught entirely in Spanish.

The projected course has three parts. Part One will address issues of border representation in Mexican literature. Mexican representations of the border have been mostly negative. This is partly because in the Mexican cultural imaginary, the northern border is not synonymous with the United States; rather, the border region has been portrayed as a marginal, problematic, migrant region whose inhabitants, influenced by American popular culture, have become "less Mexican" than the rest of Mexico's population. Thus, the northern border has been represented as a heterogeneous, hybrid place, where national identity is renegotiated and where much of the marginal aspects of mainstream culture find a place.

Part Two of the class focuses on the representation of the border in the writings of American authors, in particular in the works of Mexican American or Chicano/a writers. On the one hand, the border has been thought to be the "natural" territory of Chicanos and Mexican Americans. There seems to be a stereotype that all Americans of Mexican descent live on or near the border. And indeed some of the scholarship developed in Chicano Studies programs might support that assumption. But in fact, just as la frontera has been essentialized and even mythicized in some instances, border images in Chicano literature also form a diverse mosaic that problematizes issues of race, gender and cultural difference. To address these questions we shall examine literary and ideological issues of representation, as well as issues of class and gender as they intersect in the border.

The third part of the course will study "local" representations of the border, that is, texts written by authors who were either born and raised on the border or currently live in the area. This part attempts to view self representation and identity negotiation from a local perspective. In the works included in this section, traditional border representations such as those offered in the previous texts become challenged. The border is seen as a unique space where both the U.S. and Mexico become more of a referent than a reality.

Films:

  • Touch of Evil
  • Lone Star
  • El Norte
  • Born in East L.A.

Authors and Texts:

  • Revueltas, José. Los motivos de Caín
  • Méndez, Miguel. Peregrinos de Aztlán
  • Brito, Aristeo. El diablo en Texas
  • Islas, Arturo. The Rain God
  • Martínez, Demetria. Mothertongue
  • Anzaldúa, Gloria. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza
  • Conde, Rosina. Arrieras somos
  • Fuentes, Carlos. La frontera de cristal
  • Course Packet. Selección de crítica y relatos de Aguilar, Cisneros, Di Bella, Crosthwaite y Viramontes.

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    Spanish 895. Independent Study.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    Spanish 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

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    Spanish 993/Rom. Ling. 993/ French 993/Italian 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Helene Neu

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing. (1).

    Credits: (1).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Romance Linguistics 993..

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    Spanish 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

    Section 001.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

    This page was created at 6:37 PM on Thu, Oct 12, 2000.


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