College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Biological Anthropology


This page was created at 9:10 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Biological Anthropology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ANTHRBIO

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Biological Anthropology.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Biological Anthropology this week go to What's New This Week.

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ANTHRBIO 450. Molecular Anthropology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Andrew Merriwether (andym@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: At least one anthropology or biology course. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~andym/450sylFa01.htm

This course will cover, in detail, how to collect various kinds of molecular data. This includes polymorphisms involving PCR amplicon size, RFLP's, STR's, and DNA nucleotide and protein amino acid sequences. The theories behind these methods will be discussed so that students will understand the nature of the data being collected. This is the prerequisite course for the Molecular Anthropology Lab course, and provides the necessary background theory to learn how to actually do these procedures in lab. The second third of the course involves analysis of molecular data, and encompasses basic population genetic techniques for the analysis of molecular genetic data. These include computation of genetic distance, heterogeneity, and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium from actual data. The final third of the course will involve either presentations of critiques and explanations of published works or novel analyses of data acquired from the literature or from online databases (Genbank, GDB, etc.). The course pack will involve readings from the field.

Text: Molecular Markers, Natural History, and Evolution. by John C. Avise (1994) Chapman and Hall. Available at the Shaman Drum Bookstore optional supplemental text Genetics and the Search for Modern Human Origins by John H. Relethford (2001) Wiley-Liss

Course Requirements: 1. Readings: All assigned readings must be completed before the assigned class period. Additional readings outside the textbook will be assigned during the semester.Most will be downloadable from the library electronic journal collection as pdf files. 2. Homework problems are due the class period after they are handed out. Late homeworks will be penalized one point per day, so an assignment due Friday and turned in on the following Monday would be docked 3 points prior to grading. 3. Exams: There will be three exams a two in- class exams and a final exam worth approximately 100 points each. Each exam will include material from the text, readings, films, and discussions contained in the previous unit. Each exam will include essay, short answer, and multiple choice questions.The final exam is usually take home. 4. Project: There will be a project worth a total of 100 points.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRBIO 561. Quantitative Field Methods.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beverly I Strassmann (bis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One course in introductory statistics is helpful, but not required. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/anthrbio/561/001.nsf

This course teaches students how to enhance their fieldwork through techniques of strong inference and a powerful array of quantitative methods. These methods will be an in depth analysis of field studies conducted by both biological anthropologists and ethnologists in diverse geographic settings from the Gainj of New Guinea to the Ache of Paraguay. The goal is not to make methodology an end in itself, but rather to give students a heightened appreciation for the exicting advances in theory that can be achieved by raising the standard of evidence. The course will begin with a discussion of how to avoid biasis in sample selection and issues of sample size. The next two weeks will be devoted to a discussion of how to formulate and test alternative hypotheses against the emperical evidence, as opposed to the exclusive pursuit of a unitary argument. Weeks four and five will explore interview techniques and questionnaire design including the various instruments used in microdemographic and economic surveys. Week six will cover focal follow, behavioral scan and other quantitative methods of behavioral measurement that complement praticipant observation. In week seven, students will learn map making skills and the do's and don'ts of collecting biological samples (e.g., urine, saliva, cheek swabs) for biomedical anthropology. Week eight will address fieldwork ethics and human subject compliance. Week nine will concern health and safety in the field, followed by week ten on how to get started with statistical analysis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRBIO 563. Mechanisms of Human Adaptation.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andres R Frisancho (arfrisan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course is addressed at evaluating the physiological response and adaptations that enable humans to survive environmental extremes such as those found under stressful conditions of heat, cold, solar radiation, high altitude, undernutrition, overnutrition, and Westernization of dietary habits. Because this course is addressed to students of several disciplines and to facilitate understanding of the mechanisms of human adaptation to the environmental stress, the discussion of the major topics is preceded by sections outlining initial responses observed in laboratory animals. Emphasis is given to the short adaptive mechanisms that enable an organism to acclimate itself to a given environmental stress. Subsequently, the long-term adaptive mechanisms that enable humans to acclimatize themselves to natural, stressful environmental conditions are discussed. Throughout the course, emphasis is given to the effects of environmental stresses and the adaptive responses that an organism makes during its growth and development and their implications for understanding the origins of population differences in biological traits. The method of instruction is lecture and some discussion. The course also involves practice with field laboratory techniques.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 565. Evolution of Genus Homo.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Milford H Wolpoff (wolpoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior standing. Primarily for students concentrating in biological anthropology or vertebrate evolution. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Evolution of Homo sapiens from its Australopithecine ancestor, and the appearance of modern humans and their races are the focus of this course. Topics include the hunter/gather adaptation and the late Pliocene origin of Homo sapiens, habitation of the world and the origin of races; the "Eve" theory of modern human origins; the fate of the European Neanderthals. Three hours of lecture, two hours of scheduled laboratory, and a third unscheduled hour required weekly. There is a midterm, final, and term paper. Anthropology 351 or 365 must be taken before enrolling into this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRBIO 661. Topics in Biological Anthropology.

Section 001 Recent Developments In The Study Of Biological Anthropology.

Instructor(s): John C Mitani (mitani@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-3).

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is intended for graduate students in biological anthropology. We will review developments in the study of biological anthropology including research on human evolution, genetics, behavioral ecology, and adaptation. The seminar will also provide a forum for students to present and review their own research. Here discussions will focus on critiques of grant proposals, research design, and thesis chapters.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 665. Topics in Human Evolution.

Section 001 Analysis Of Modern Human Origins Issues.

Instructor(s): Milford H Wolpoff (wolpoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will examine mathematical approaches to hypotheses of ancestry for late Paleolithic human specimens from Europe, Australia, and China.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 961. Research Practicum in Anthropology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-8). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 962. Anthropological Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 963. Survey of Literature on Selected Topics.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRBIO 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate Standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRBIO 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Instructor(s): Milford H Wolpoff (wolpoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate Standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Winter Academic Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRBIO 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing; Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for ANTHRBIO.


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