College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Cultural Anthropology


This page was created at 9:10 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Cultural Anthropology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ANTHRCUL

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Cultural Anthropology this week go to What's New This Week.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

ANTHRCUL 407. Archaeology of South Asia.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carla M Sinopoli (sinopoli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an overview of South Asian Archaeology from the earliest evidence for hominids at c. 1.5 million years ago through the emergence of early historic states and empires. Discusses major cultural transitions and important sites in several regions of South Asia, in the context of the history of archaeological research in this area.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

ANTHRCUL 414 / CAAS 444. Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu (omk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean. Topics covered include: the historical origins of the social structure and social organization of contemporary Caribbean states; family and kinship; religion, race, class, ethnicity, and national identity; Caribbean immigration; politics and policies of socioeconomic change. The course is open to both anthropology concentrators and non-concentrators. Films and videos on the Caribbean will be shown when available. Requirements: four 3-5 page typewritten papers, which ask students to synthesize reading and lecture materials; participation in class discussions; regular class attendance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 416 / HBEHED 516. Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Inhorn

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ANTHRCUL 425. Evolution of War and Peace in Unstratified Societies.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raymond C Kelly (rck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the origins of war and the early evolutionary development of war alliance and peace-making. It examines the conditions under which warfare is initiated in sociocultural contexts where it did not previously exist and elucidates the origin of war in that sense. The course begins with a delineation of the distinctive characteristics of peaceful (or warless) societies that represent both a prior sociocultural disposition and the context in which primal warfare arises and takes shape. Consideration of peaceful societies illuminates certain key features of the transition from warlessness to warfare and provides a basis for identifying transitional cases. These sociocultural systems exemplify the causes, conduct, and consequences of nascent and early warfare. The subsequent co-evolution of war and pre-state societies is traced, including the development of alliance and peacemaking. Format: lecture and discussion. Requirements: substantial term paper and presentation.

Texts:

  • L. Keley, War Before Civilization 1996. Chapters 1-5 pp. 3-71.
  • T. Hobbes, Leviathan 1651. Part One Chapter 13 pp. 104-109, Of the Natural Conditions of Mankind...
  • K. Otterbein, Capital Punishment Defined in The Ultimate Coercive Sanction 1986, pp. 9-13.
  • M. Roper, Evidence of Warfare in the Near East from 10,000-4,300 BC, in War: Its Causes and Correlates M.A. Nettleship, et al., eds. 1975, pp. 299-343.
  • mber, Myths about Hunter-Gatrs in Ethnology 1978, Vol. 17(4), pp. 439-448.
  • D. Fabbro, Peaceful Societies in Journal of Peace Research 1978, XV(1), pp. 67-83.
  • E. Service, Profiles in Ethnology 1978, pp. 35-110 (providing brief sketches of the Yahgan Andaman Islanders Copper Eskimo and !Kung Bushman).
  • R. Lee, Conflict and Violence in The !Kung San 1979 Chapter 13, pp. 370-400.
  • B. Knauft, Reconsidering Violence in Simple Human Societies in Current Anthropology 1987, 28(4), pp. 457-500.
  • J. Manson and R. Wrangham, Intergroup Aggression in Chimpanzees and Humans in Current Anthropology 1991, 32(4), pp. 369-390.
  • B. Knauft, Violence and Sociality in Human Evolution in Current Anthropology 1991, 32(4), pp. 391-428.
  • A. Balikci, Conflict and Society in The Netsilik Eskimo 1989 Chapter 9, pp. 172-193.
  • C. Boehm, Feuding in the Nonliterate World in Blood Revenge 1984, Chapter 11, pp. 191-227.
  • K. Koch, An Anthropological View of Conflict in War and Peace in Jalemo 1974, Chapter 1, pp. 26.35.
  • A. Radcliffe-Brown, Primitive Law in Structure and Function Primitive Society 1965, Chapter 12, pp. 212-219.
  • B. Spencer and F.J. Gillen, The Avenging Party in Central Australia in Native Tribes of Central Australia 1899, Chapter 13, pp. 476-496.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 440. Cultural Adaptation.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stuart A Kirsch (skirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Environmental anthropology. This course considers a range of theoretical perspectives on human-environmental relations. Topics will most likely include: perceptions of the environment, rethinking the nature/culture dichotomy, ritual regulation of natural resources, ethnoecologies and traditional ecological knowledge, debates about common property regimes, environmental history, political ecology, the concept of risk society and contemporary environmental movements. The course format is lecture and discussion. Requirements include class participation, several short essays, a class presentation and a take-home final. The readings include ethnographies, theoretical monographs, edited collections and a course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 455 / WOMENSTD 455. Feminist Theory and Gender Studies in Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How are gender and power related? What does gender have to do with racial, sexual, or national identities? This course shows that feminist anthropology offers an important perspective for analyzing gender as an integral part of the organization and representation of social life. It examines the conditions within which women and men act, and focuses on how gender is historically constructed and embedded within institutions and beliefs in different social strata and cultures. It relates feminist anthropology to issues of contemporary concern and to problems addressed by other disciplines. The class will combine lecture, discussion, and student presentation. It will draw on a variety of theoretical, ethnographic, biographical, and visual materials. Students will write several short commentaries on readings and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Language, Culture & Society Of Former USSR.

Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores uses of language in Soviet and post-Soviet societies as well as understandings of what language is and does. We will explore familiar political themes (such as the ways both Tsarist and Stalinist regimes assigned textual language real-world force, as in censorship even of poetry). But we will also take up approaches that analyze ways language is used, whether in media or in conversation, and the ways such uses of language reproduce social hierarchies. Our readings will include works from anthropology, linguistics, political science and literature, to be supplemented by occasional film viewings. It is recommended that students have at least one course in linguistic anthrpology, linguistics, slavics, or CREES at or above the 200-level.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 The Social Contexts Of Language Development.

Instructor(s): Barbara A Meek (bameek@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Topics such as children, education, bilingualism and endangerment are ever present in public discourse. Underlying these popular foci exist issues regarding language development, i.e., how do children learn language? Or, more exactly, how does any individual acquire and learn to use one or more languages? Also, what happens and what does it mean if he or she doesn't? This course focuses on the complexity of these questions by examining various contexts of language use and their impact on language development. This entails variables such as linguistic diversity and multilingual enviornments, cultural practices and social relations, and linguistic and cultural ideologies. We will also consider how different methods used to study language development inform our understanding of this process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 Ethnicity And Culture In Latin America: Mestizaje And Nation. Meets With LACS 400.001 & History 478.001.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Conceptions of race are at the heart of Latin American nationalisms yet they have received limited analytical attention. Concealed by the equalizing language of republican statehood, these concepts of race are intertwined with ethnic, gender and class hierarchies having colonial foundations and legitimized as bringing "civilization" to a "barbarous" people. In this course we will focus on the idealized and yet inherently violent process of "mestizaje" (racial mixing) and its relationship to projects of nation formation and imperial expansion. Our readings will discuss elite discourses as well as responses by non-elites to racialized structures of exclusion in cases including Cuba, Nicaragua, Mexico and Venezuela. We will use a variety of materials, including film and novels; students will write two papers and short commentaries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 004 Puerto Ricans on the Island and in the Continental U.S. Meets with American Culture 410.002.

Instructor(s): Jorge Duany

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the most important trends in ethnographic research on Puerto Rican culture throughout the twentieth century. Students will discuss the recurrent themes, conceptual problems, academic debates, and forms of representing Puerto Ricans in anthropological texts, photographs, museum collections, and fairs. Particular emphasis will be given to transformations in colonial, nationalist, and transnational discourses on Puerto Rican cultural identity. The fieldwork of such major scholars as Franz Boas, Julian Steward, Sidney Mintz, Oscar Lewis, Helen Safa, and Philippe Bourgois will be studied in the Puerot Rican context.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 483. Near Eastern Prehistory.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kent V Flannery (kflanner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course traces the evolution of culture and society in Israel, Jordan, Syria, Iraq, and Iran, from the earliest evidence for humans in the region (over 1,000,000 years ago) until the rise of Mesopotamian civilization (around 2500 B.C.) Topics include the origins of agriculture and animal domestication, the establishment of village and town life, and the rise of cities in the Tigris-Euphrates lowlands.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 494. Introduction to Analytical Methods in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert E Whallon Jr (whallon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: One course in statistics and junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to the major methods of statistical analysis used in archaeological research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 519 / LING 517 / GERMAN 517. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 517.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 526. Traditions of Ethnology I.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu), Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course presents the major schools and traditions in ethnology from its nineteenth-century precursors to about 1950. It is the first part of a year-long sequence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 553. Blurred Genres: Autobiography, Fiction & Ethnography.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Where does the story of the observer end and the story of the observed begin? Autobiography, ethnography, and fiction share a concern with constructing meaningful representations of the self and of the other in narrative form. This course will focus on the history, politics, and possibilities of interconnecting autobiography, ethnography, and fiction. We will read widely in a variety of ethnographic, fictional, and autobiographic genres, including literary journalism, autobiographic ethnography, feminist ethnography, fieldwork accounts, the memoir, autobiographical criticism, family stories, and fiction that uses first-person voices. Our theoretical aim will be to gain an understanding of our current historical moment as one in which writers both inside and outside of the academy are pursuing intersecting trajectories in their use of the personal voice to explore the social world. We will consider the recent "memoir boom" and its impact on the academy as well as the academy's impact on its flourishing. We will also consider gender differences in the use of the personal voice, exploring the fine line that distinguishes "reflexive" (often coded as "male") and "confessional" (often coded as "female") writing within anthropology. And we will ask what anthropology, as a personal act of witnessing scripted in diverse genres, means at the end of the century. Our practical aim will be to gain expertise in the analysis and use of a range of textual strategies, including monologue, dialogue, first person narrative, third person narrative, flashback, different methods of quoting or paraphrasing "informants," and descriptive accounts of other places, times, and subjectivities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 Ethics and Anthropology

Instructor(s): Conrad P Kottak (ckottak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 Media and Anthropology

Instructor(s): Kelly M Askew (kaskew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar engages students in an anthropological crituque of the ways in which technologies (photography, radio, television, film, music, cassettes, newspapers and magazines, the Internet) represent and construct cultures. The marriage between global capital and Eurocentrism appears to have spawned trends in cultural production that allow for only partial, sterotypical, essentialized and greatly condensed representations of cultures beyond (and within) American and Europe. Identity politics, cultural imperialism, consumerism, indigenous media, popular culture, nationalism, transnationalism, and ethnographic film are some of the topics we will explore. We will question how these media all too often constitute 'masked' media in their tendencies to submerge and suppress differences while producing formulaic identities. Our goal in this seminar is, to borrow from Faye Ginsburg (1994), to deconstruct the 'massness' of mass media by recognizing the complex ways the culturally and historically differentiated ways in which people are engaged in the processess of production, representation, reception and distribution.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 004 Culture and the Politics Of Sentiment. Meets with History 698.003.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course starts from two premises: (1) that sentiments articulate the personal and the political in historically specific ways; and (2) that sentiments are historically located social phenomena with specific histories of their own. Drawing on a range of work in anthropology, history, philosophy, political science, and literacy criticism, this seminar explores how the relationship between thought and feeling, rationality and passion, reason and sentiment has been differently understood. The focus of the seminar will be on sentiment as an index of relations of power and as a tracer of them. Seminar themes will include attention to social inequality and sentiment, state formation and affect, the racial politics of compassion, the colonial history of sympathy, "structures of feeling" and sentiment a a marker of political and social location. The focus is less on anthropological approaches to the emotions than on sentiment as a relationship of power and as an historical and cultural practice. Course requirements include weekly commentaries on the readings, a short review essay and a research paper. For more information contact astoler@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 005 Methods In The Ethnography Of Everyday Life.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Fricke (tomf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.ethno.isr.umich.edu/

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 006 Contested Childhood In A Changing Global Order. Meets With Human Behavioir (Social Work) 718.001.

Instructor(s): Pamela A Reynolds

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

One aim of the seminar is to examine how children are represented in public policy and cultural politics, and how transformations in nation states and institutions affect children and are, in turn, affected by the young. The nature of the times calls for meticulous attention to and acknowledgement of contestations that imbue young lives with inordinate stress. Another aim is to stimulate theory and influence policy by taking a broad view of the manner in which we conceive of childhood, especially in disputation, and to describe the effects of ideas and policy on children's passage from conception to full citizenship.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 007 Theories of Sexual Differences: From Perversity to Diversity. Meets with Institute for the Humanities 511.001 and Women's Studies 698.006

Instructor(s): Gayle S. Rubin

Prerequisites: 400-level coursework in Anthropology and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Institute for the Humanities 511.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 576. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Dickinson (jdcknson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Two courses in anthropology or biology. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/anthrcul/576/001.nsf

In introduction to language and linguistics for anthropologists. The nature of language as a sign activity, the status of linguistic representations and semiotic and biological bases of linguistic universals are explored.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 578. Monographs in the Ethnography of Speaking.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Anthro. 576. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with major works in the ethnography of speaking, ranging from studies that approach language ethnographically to those that approach ethnography through language. It considers ways in which ethnographers have used linguistic evidence to draw inferences about social relations and cultural patterns, and consider the methodological insights and problems raised by these studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 581. Archaeology I.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert E Whallon Jr (whallon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Roughly half of this course is devoted to developing models of the operation and evolution of Hunter-Gatherer cultural systems and to discussing the ways in which these systems may be studied from the archaeological record. The second half of the course consists of a review of the archaeological evidence from the evolution of these cultural systems from their earliest appearance until the beginnings of sedentary agricultural communities. Emphasis is given to Africa with breif attention paid to Asia and the New World.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 587 / CLARCH 531 / HISTART 531. Aegean Art and Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John F Cherry (jcherry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Class. Arch. 221 or 222. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 531.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 589. Neutron Activation Analysis in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leah Delia Minc (leahminc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) is a highly sensitive and accurate technique for measuring the concentrations of major, minor, and trace elements in archaeological and historical materials. Researchers employ the technique to determine the provenience of raw materials and artifacts, to trace patterns of trade and exchange, to investigate palaeodiet and nutrition, and to authenticate antiquities and works of art. This course (conducted in cooperation with the University's research reactor) provides students with the fundamental principles and methods of NAA, along with hands-on experience in utilizing this technique to determine the elemental composition of archaeological materials. The course focuses on three areas: (1) the technical and practical aspects of NAA, including irradiation procedures, gamma-ray spectrometry, and the determination of trace-element concentrations; (2) the quantitative methods for analyzing and utilizing NAA data; and (3) the anthropological interpretation of NAA data, through an introduction to the natural and cultural factors affecting trace-element concentrations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 593. Archaeological Systematics.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John M O'Shea (joshea@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior concentrators, graduates, with permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed principally for graduate students in anthropology. It examines the epistemological basis for archaeology, major theoretical frameworks for reconstructing past human organization and studying its change, and methodological approaches appropriate for such investigations. The course is designed as a seminar, with strong emphasis on active student participation. There are no exams, but a paper is required at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 625. Anthropological Approaches to Property and Property Rights.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery (verdery@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A significant area of change in the new global economy is in concepts of property and property rights. These topics staples of past anthropological research and legal scholarship promise to be at the forefront of work in the social sciences for the next decade. They are critical to the transfomation of formerly socialist societies, questions of indigenous rights and heritage claims, environmental politics, studies of "the body," and numerous other issues. This course offers an overview of thinking about property, from an anthropological vantage point. We will read some political theory and early anthropological treatments of the topic, then turn to contemporary writing on the following: "privatization," cultural property, debates on "the common," and property in body parts. Requirements include regular class attendance/participation, and a term paper to be briefly presented at the end of the academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 629. Method and Interpretation in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raymond C Kelly (rck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing. (1, 3).

Credits: (1, 3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is concerned with anthropological field research from research design and grant proposal writing, to data collection and analysis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 640 / HISTORY 603. Seminar in Anthropology and History.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Radical Geography: Gender, Class And Globalization.

Instructor(s): Sharad Chari (schari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How does an explicitly geographical social analysis clarify the multiple ways in which gender and class mediate how what is now called 'globalization' operates spatially, through regions, in relation to nature and through the cultural politics of place? This seminar has two beginnings: First, we interrogate Classical Marxist theories of imperalism and agriculture as questions of geography, concerning the spatial and natural dynamics of capitalist development. Second, we pose this tradition against a Foucauldian notion of 'governmentality,' and question its efficacy in understanding the fragmentation of regulation in an era of neoliberalism. As an alternative, we turn to the foundational texts of radical geographic thought particularly the work of Henri Lefebvre, Gunnar Olsson, David Harvey, and Doreen Massey followed by case studies written through explicitly geographical methods, centered on themes of gender, class and 'globalization' (as it relates to ideas of imperialism, geopolitics, neoliberalism, regulation and government). The central question of this course is whether and how thinking geographically (and not simply historically or ethnographically) allows us to ground intersections of gender, class and globalization in a comparative social analysis that draws from Marxism, feminism and environmental critique. Conversely, we will ask whether and how radical critique is enriched in engagement with the five canonical senses of human geography as spatial dynamics, the politics of place, human-environment interaction, movement and regionalism. Seminar participants will participate in elements of a collective research project on changing human geographies in and around Ann Arbor, to see, for instance how its rise as a "postindustrial" cosmopolitan small town has accompanied the transformation of working-class neighborhoods in Ypsilanti and the rural town of Dexter. What have these changes meant for a variety of people's lives and livelihoods and how do they reflect the uneven and inconstant dynamics of capitalist development? Students will use local archives, memories of area residents and field observations to put radical geography into research practice in grounding gender, class and 'globalization' in the geographies we live and work in.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Anthropology/History Core Seminar.

Instructor(s): David W Cohen (dwcohen@umich.edu), Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about theory, methods, and the craft of social research and writing, focusing on the interplay of history and anthropology. This course will be based on the intensive discussion of classical and pathbreaking articles and monographs. It is particularly intended for students in the Anthropology and History Program as well as in the Departments of History and Anthropology who are interested in developing projects which involve the integration of historical and anthropological perspectives. This course will meet once a week in the evening. Students will have the option of developing their concerns doing summer research and taking a research seminar during the Fall, where their written work and research in progress will be discussed. Students interested in taking this course are encouraged to send a brief (one page) email notice or written statement to the instructor indicating their interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 675. Topics in Anthropological Linguistics.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001 Language And The Gendered Self. Meets With Linguistics 792.001 & Women's Studies 698.003.

Instructor(s): Robin M Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Anthro. 576 or Ling. 411 and Graduate Standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 792.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 683. Topics in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001 Archaeology of Death.

Instructor(s): Augustin F C Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines mortuary practices and their change through time from their remote origins 1000,000 years ago to the present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 683. Topics in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 002 Archaeology of Empires. Meets With Classical Studies 683.001.

Instructor(s): Carla M Sinopoli (sinopoli@umich.edu), Susan E Alcock

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (2-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The scale, internal complexity, and diversity of archaic empires pose considerable challenges to archaeology. In this course we will examine and develop approaches for the archaeological study of early empires using archaeological data from a variety of contexts in the New and Old World. Among the topics we will examine are: definitions and typologies of empires and imperialism; the geography of empires and core-preiphery relations; the imperial capital; infrastructure and settlement; imperial ideology; military strategies and organization; the impact of imperialism on economies, settlement, political and social organization in incorporating and incorporated areas, and resistance to imperial domination. In examining these and other questions we will focus on differences within and among archaic empires, using archaeological case studies from a wide range of regions, including, but not limited to: Mesoamerica, Andean South America, Mesopotamia, South Asia and the Roman Empire.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 760 / PSYCH 689. Culture and Cognition.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lawrence A Hirschfeld (lhirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology and permission of instructor. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/anthrcul/760/001.nsf

This seminar is part of an interdisciplinary program initiated by the Departments of Anthropology and Psychology. The seminar includes both students and faculty. In it we will explore how the cultural environment influences, and is influenced by, reasoning and other psychological processes. The cognitive revolution has been based upon the tacit assumption that all humans have the same basic cognitive structures and functions, and that cultures and other social contexts contribute only peripherally important content differences. Anthropologists have long argued that both the context and function of knowledge may be strongly linked to the types of problems that a given culture or social group must habitually solve. The seminar will focus on ways in which cognition may be culturally mediated, socially situated, and contingent on historical forces. Recent research in the field will be presented and discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 777. Lingusitic Anthropology Laboratory.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Anthropology Or A Related Discipline. (1-3). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ANTHRCUL 825 / HISTORY 825 / CHIN 825 / ECON 825 / POLSCI 825 / SOC 825. Seminar in Chinese History and Society.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Either language knowledge (Chinese or Japanese) or Hist. 544 or Pol. Sci. 455. Graduate standing. (3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 825.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 957. Research Practicum in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2-8). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 958. Anthropological Research.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 959. Survey of Literature on Selected Topics.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate Standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing; Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


Page


This page was created at 9:10 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.


LSA logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2001 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.