College of LS&A

Fall '01 Graduate Course Guide

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Courses in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies


This page was created at 9:11 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for AAPTIS

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

To see what graduate courses have been added to or changed in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies this week go to What's New This Week.

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AAPTIS 403. Advanced Modern Standard Arabic I.

Arabic: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Muhammad S Eissa (eissa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 202. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course emphasizes the use of Arabic language. That is, students will develop the ability to:

  1. communicate/speak in Arabic with native speakers of Arabic;
  2. understand spoken Arabic;
  3. read and understand selected readings taken from various genres of modern prose fiction and non-fiction as well as Arabic newspaper and magazines; and
  4. enhance writing skills.

Use of Arabic is emphasized throughout the whole course based on communicative approaches to learning. Course grade is based on class attendance and participation, written assignments, weekly quizzes and tests, and a final exam.

Required text:

  1. Peter Abboud et al., Elementary Modern Standard Arabic Part II (Lessons 30-45),
  2. Supplementary Enrichment Vocabulary to Accompany EMSA, and
  3. Standard Achievement Tests to Accompany EMSA.
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 461 / HISTORY 442. The First Millennium of the Islamic Near East.

Islamic Studies and Near Eastern History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael David Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Taught in English. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the first course in a two-course introductory sequence (442 and 443) that covers Near Eastern history from the era of Muhammad to the present. Our purpose is to introduce you to (and give you some practice in) methods of studying the Near East as well as to some of the content of Near Eastern history; we expect no previous background in the field.

This course begins with the background and rise of Islam and ends in the heyday of the Ottoman Turkish and Safavid Persian empires, circa 1700. Although the basic organization of the course is chronological, we will discuss topics in such areas as politics and governance, religion (formal and "folk," including theology and mysticism), law, foreign relations and war, art and architecture, literature, economics, and social life. The classes will include lectures by (and probably discussions between) the instructors, and there will also be weekly class discussion of the assigned readings. In addition to the final examination, students will be expected to prepare two three-page exercises based on the readings, which will consist of modern scholarly works and translated medieval sources.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 464 / HISTORY 543. Perso-Islamic Civilization in the Eastern Caliphate and India, 900-1350.

Persian-Iranian Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Junior standing. Taught in English. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will focus on the Persianate idiom in medieval and early modern Islamdom, delineating the ways in which pre-Islamic cultural systems shaped a variety of Muslim identities (Shi'i, and Sufi) in its central and eastern landscapes (Iran, Iraq, Asia Minor, Northern India). We will study this worldview through a medley of texts epics like Ferdowsi's Book of Kings, Sufi poetry like Attar's Conference of Birds, and philosophical treatises like Nasir al-Din's Tusi's Ethics. Courtly circles, coffeehouses and theological seminaries will be explored so as to provide texture to the arenas in which this ethos was expressed and experienced. Constructs such as loyalty, piety, and honor will serve as tools not only to study another world which is to be understood on its own terms.

Students will be expected to read all their assignments and be prepared to discuss the material in class. Grades are based on participtation, presentations, and papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 486. Topics in Modern Arabic Literature in Translation.

Arabic Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 Mappings of the Arab Renaissance.

Instructor(s): Anton Shammas (antons@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Taught in English. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The different histories of the Arab Nahdah (Renaissance) have been mainly a reflection of the different mappings of the problematically complex relationship between the Arab World and the West, in the wake of the French invasion of Egypt in 1798. This course will offer a cultural, literary and intellectual reading of the Nahdah from the standpoint of its forerunners, from Al-Jabarti to Jabra. It will explore some of the traditionally ignored events of the nineteenth century: the publication of the Bulaq edition of alf laylah wa-laylah in 1935; Shidyaq's 1855 al-saq 'ala al-saq; the 1865 Protestant translation of the Bible into Arabic; Bustani's Encyclopedia; the 1882 "Darwin Affair," etc. Besides focusing on the intellectual biographies of some of the "founders," a special emphasis will be put on the emergence of the concept of time in modern Arabic literature, heralding the rise of the Arabic novel as a literary genre. Students will be evaluated through class performance; three, e-mailed short essays on the weekly readings, for in-class presentations; and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 491. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 Islamic Legal Theory. Meets With AAPTIS 591.001 and Law 812.001

Instructor(s): Sherman A Jackson (sajackso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 591.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 496 / WOMENSTD 496. Gender and Representation in the Modern Middle East.

Islamic Studies and Near Eastern History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carol B Bardenstein (cbardens@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the many different ways that gender and female and male subjectivities "of" the Middle East are constructed, represented, and deployed in a variety of literary and cultural forms, including the novel, short story, travel accounts, and visual images in film, photography, and painting. Topics we will explore include the veiling of women, genderized and sexualized aspects of the relationship portrayed and enacted between colonizer and colonized in the Middle Eastern context, images of women in nationalist discourse, constructions of masculinity and "manliness," challenges to and subversions of traditionally inscribed gender roles, etc. Close attention will be paid to differences between such representations which emerge as a result of who authors or creates them, and from what kind of gendered subject position European/western men, European/western women, Middle Eastern men, Middle Eastern women.

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AAPTIS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AAPTIS 501. Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raji M Rammuny (raram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 404. Taught in Arabic. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The objectives of this course are to develop fluency and accuracy in understanding, speaking, and writing modern standard Arabic, and to expand students' awareness of Arab-Islamic culture and civilization. The course is based on a variety of literary texts and authentic cultural audio-visual materials including slides, video cassettes, and films. The course materials reflect not only the literary but also the cultural, social, and political trends of contemporary Arab society. Occasionally, students are required to read outside topics and give brief presentations. Evaluation is based on daily preparations, weekly written compositions, monthly tests, and a final paper in Arabic. Textbook is Advanced Standard Arabic by Raji Rammuny. Parts One and Two.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 532. Arabic Linguistics.

Linguistics: Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey G Heath (jheath@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Some knowledge of Arabic. Open to undergraduates with instructor's permission. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Introduction to the linguistic analysis of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Arabic (literary and dialectal), with some attention to historical and sociolinguistic aspects. Topics include the modeling of derivational ablaut, the historical trend toward simpler word forms and more rigid phrasal syntax, the concept of creolization and its possible application to Arabic vernaculars, diglossia, and the mixing of literary Arabic and foreign material into modern vernaculars.

For students with some training in literary Arabic or significant exposure to any Arabic vernacular. Open to undergraduates with instructor's permission. Aimed primarily at graduate students in NES, some of whom have strong linguistic interests, but it could accommodate interested students from Anthropology, Linguistics, History, etc. Also undergraduates who have done extensive coursework in Arabic and are developing linguistic interests. Not designed as an adjunct to basic language courses. Lecture/Discussion.

Class attendance and participation. Short assignments and two papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 544. Modern Persian Fiction.

Persian-Iranian Literature and Culture in Persian

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot L Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Persian 242 or 243. Taught in Persian. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a third-year, advanced level Persian course. It offers an introduction to contemporary Persian fiction and the dominant themes of the cultural and political matrix in which the texts originate. It is taught as a "hands-on" proseminar. Students will take turns in discussing assigned texts, authors, and topics. The language of the class is Persian, with occasional discussions of technical and linguistic matters in English. The required texts and secondary readings include a course pack and readings from books on reserve. Grades are based on class participation, reports and presentations, and a term project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

AAPTIS 563. Modern Arabic Nonfiction.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Trevor Legassick (tleg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 403 or reading knowledge of Arabic. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces the work of major Arab writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Variable in focus according to the interests of the class, readings are selected for translation, analysis, and commentary. The course explores the historical progression in the development of political and societal theories in modern times in the Arab world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 567. Readings in Classical Islamic Texts.

Arabic Literature and Culture in Arabic

Section 001 Muslim Theology.

Instructor(s): Sherman A Jackson (sajackso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: AAPTIS 202 or 403. Taught in English. (2).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the analytical reading of classical Arabic texts from different fields of the Islamic tradition. This academic term the topic will be Muslim theology. This will include a brief historical survey of the development of the theological discourse in medieval Islam along with a thematic treatment of some of the most salient issues debated among theologians. Selections will be drawn from both the traditionalist (Ahl al-hadith and Hanbalites) and rationalist (Mu'tazilite, Ash'arite, Maturidite) traditions. Reading knowledge of Arabic required. Course lectures will be in English. Midterm and brief translation with a critical introduction.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 591. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 Islamic Legal Theory. Meets With AAPTIS 491.001 and Law 812.001

Instructor(s): Sherman A Jackson (sajackso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce students to classical Islamic legal theory and some applications of positive law in the Sunni tradition. After a brief review of the seminal controversies that defined the "formative period," and the development of Islamic legal theory, we will examine the interpretive modus operandi of the full-blown schools of law in the "post- formative" era. This will include an examination of such key issues as ijtihad versus taqlid, the madhhab (or school of law), the legal responsum (fatwa), legal ecclecticism, and the issue of legal change, stasis and borrowing. This will be carried out via a general overview of a number of areas of positive law, e.g., marriage, divorce, abortion, child custody, and legal procedure. The course will conclude with a look at developments in Islamic legal thinking in modern times, including an examination of some legal responsa (in translation) to some important modern controversies and a few samples of jurisprudential writings of Muslim scholars in the East and West. All required readings will be in English.

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AAPTIS 591. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 002 Persian Paleography.

Instructor(s): Firuza Abdullaeva (fia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AAPTIS 593. Mini Course Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 001 THE MODERN TURKISH NOVEL. Meets 9/5 10/12. (Drop/Add deadline=September 25).

Instructor(s): Oguz Cebeci

Prerequisites: (1).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This minicourse is meant to provide undergraduate and graduate students with a survey of modern Turkish literature. The need and justification for this course is as follows: in the period from the early to mid-twentieth century, Turkish society changed drastically, and the novel emerged as an important force in defining a national identity. This course will attempt to bridge the literary achievements of writers and the socio-political significance of those works. Format: This minicourse will meet once a week for 3 hours and will be in lecture/seminar format. Course Requirements: One class presentation and a final paper. Instructor: Oguz Cebeci, Ph.D., Bogazici University, moguzcebeci@hotmail.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 653 / POLSCI 653. Proseminar in Middle East Politics.

Islamic Studies and Near Eastern History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Tessler

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (3).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Political Science 653.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 798. Directed Graduate Readings.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate standing. (1-3). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 837. Applied Linguistics and the Teaching of Arabic.

Linguistics: Arabic

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raji M Rammuny (raram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and advanced knowledge of Arabic. Graduate Standing. (4).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The main purpose of this course is to provide graduate students, who are genuinely interested in teaching, with basic training in applied linguistics and theory and practice in foreign language teaching and learning with particular emphasis on teaching Arabic to non-Arabs. Topics include: teacher's preparation; Arabic diglossia and its implication for Arabic instruction; learning theories and principles of second language acquisition; teaching the specific skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and culture; testing and grading; use of audiovisual and technological aids; material development; evaluation and modification of instructional materials. Students are required to read assignments, observe classes and attend special lectures and workshops on campus and to submit brief reports once a week based on their readings, observations, or participation. Towards the end of the course, the focus will shift towards systematic and supervised teaching practice, testing and grading and training in material development. There is a group meeting once a week for discussion and analysis of issues related to the reading assignments or practice teaching problems based on classroom teaching and tutoring. In addition, each trainer is required to provide tutoring assistance, for the maximum of two hours per week, to a beginning Arabic language student who needs extra help. Course grade is based on a weekly diary, lesson plans, materials developed by trainees and participation (50%); a term project involving analysis and critical evaluation of a topic related to language learning and teaching, including development or modification of language materials (50%). Textbooks: (1) Raji M. Rammuny, Annotated Bibliography on Foreign Language Learning and Teaching, (2) CRLT, A Guidebook for University of Michigan Teaching Assistants, (3) Course packet at Kolossos, 310 E. Washington.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AAPTIS 990. Dissertation/Precandidate.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate Standing. (1-8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-8; 1-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s): Raji M Rammuny (raram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites: Must have a Teaching Assistantship. Graduate Standing. (1).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this one credit workshop is to provide advice and experience for new GSIs by helping them prepare for and conduct class discussions effectively, and to grade students' written work efficiently. There will be weekly assigned readings covering a variety of techniques and strategies for stimulating effective discussion and evaluating students' written work. In addition, each participant is expected to attend at least two CRLT workshops offered in the fall to address related issues such as interactive lecturing, leading discussions, and evaluating teaching; and to share the information which he/she has learned with other classmates. All participants are required to observe each other teaching and fill out class visit reports in order to develop their critical thinking, and to help them analyze and critique the various procedures and strategies used in varying class discussion situations. The final grade will be based on class attendance, performance, oral presentations and summary reports. There will be weekly two-hour meetings for a total of seven weeks.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 995. Dissertation/Candidate.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Graduate Standing. (8). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: 8; 4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Undergraduate Course Listings for AAPTIS.


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This page was created at 9:11 AM on Thu, Oct 11, 2001.


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